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Volume 18, Number 6—June 2012

CME ACTIVITY

Pretransplant Fecal Carriage of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae and Infection after Liver Transplant, France

Frédéric BertComments to Author , Béatrice Larroque, Catherine Paugam-Burtz, Federica Dondero, François Durand, Estelle Marcon, Jacques Belghiti, Richard Moreau, and Marie-Hélène Nicolas-Chanoine
Author affiliations: Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France (F. Bert, B. Larroque, C. Paugam-Burtz, F. Dondero, F. Durand, E. Marcon, J. Belghiti, R. Moreau, M.H. Nicolas-Chanoine); Université Paris VII Faculté de Médecine D. Diderot, Paris, France (C. Paugam-Burtz, F. Durand, J. Belghiti, M.H. Nicolas-Chanoine); INSERM U 773 Centre de Recherche Biomédicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (F. Durand, R. Moreau, M.H. Nicolas-Chanoine)

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Figure

Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence type 2 PCR patterns of pairs of Escherichia coli isolates from 6 patients examined during study of extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae infection among liver transplant recipients, France, January 2001–April 2010. The pretransplant colonizing isolate (C) and the posttransplant infecting isolate (I) show identical patterns for patients 2, 3, and 6 and different patterns for patients 1, 4, and 5. M, molecular mass stand

Figure. . . Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence type 2 PCR patterns of pairs of Escherichia coli isolates from 6 patients examined during study of extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae infection among liver transplant recipients, France, January 2001–April 2010. The pretransplant colonizing isolate (C) and the posttransplant infecting isolate (I) show identical patterns for patients 2, 3, and 6 and different patterns for patients 1, 4, and 5. M, molecular mass standard.

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