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Volume 19, Number 7—July 2013

Research

Travel-associated Illness Trends and Clusters, 2000–2010

Karin LederComments to Author , Joseph Torresi, John S. Brownstein, Mary E. Wilson, Jay S. Keystone, Elizabeth Barnett, Eli Schwartz, Patricia Schlagenhauf, Annelies Wilder-Smith, Francesco Castelli, Frank von Sonnenburg, David O. Freedman, and Allen C. Cheng, for the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network
Author affiliations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (K. Leder); Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (K. Leder, A.C. Cheng); Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia (J. Torresi); University of Melbourne, Parkville (J. Torresi); Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (J.S. Brownstein); Harvard Medical School, Boston (J.S. Brownstein); Harvard School of Public Health, Boston (M.E. Wilson); Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (J.S. Keystone); University of Toronto, Toronto (J.S. Keystone); Boston Medical Center, Boston (E. Barnett); Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Isreal (E. Schwartz); Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel (E. Schwartz); University of Zurich WHO Collaborating Centre for Travellers’ Health, Zurich, Switzerland (P. Schlagenhauf); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (A. Wilder-Smith); University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy (F. Castelli); University of Munich, Munich, Germany (F. von Sonnenburg); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA (D.O. Freedman); Alfred Hospital, Melbourne (A.C. Cheng)

Main Article

Table 1

Major diagnoses for returning travelers visiting 18 GeoSentinel sites, 2000–2010*

Diagnosis No. cases
Malaria 1,762
Giardiasis 1,296
Dengue fever 888
Campylobacteriosis 596
Cutaneous larva migrans 577
Rabies postexposure prophylaxis 349
Enteric fever† 262
Spotted fever rickettsiosis 220
Chikungunya 120
Acute hepatitis A 94
Confirmed influenza A/B 84

*Other diagnoses included nonspecific gastrointestinal or diarrheal syndromes (≈25% of all patients); nonspecific febrile illness or viral syndrome (≈10%); rash, itch, or skin infection (≈10%); respiratory syndrome (≈5%); and other infectious and noninfectious problems.
†Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, S. enterica ser. Paratyphi, or unspecified.

Main Article

1Additional members of the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network who contributed data (in descending order of contribution): Kevin Kain and Andrea Boggild, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Louis Loutan and François Chappuis, Geneva, Switzerland; DeVon C. Hale, Rahul Anand, and Stephanie S. Gelman, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; Graham Brown, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Giampiero Carosi, Brescia, Italy; Bradley A. Connor, New York, New York, USA; N. Jean Haulman, David Roesel, and Elaine C. Jong, Seattle, Washington, USA; Phyllis E. Kozarsky, Jessica Fairley, and Carlos Franco-Paredes, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Marc Shaw and Annemarie Hern, Auckland, New Zealand; Christina M. Coyle and Murray Wittner, Bronx, New York, USA; Lin H. Chen, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Noreen Hynes, R. Bradley Sack, and Robin McKenzie, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Carmelo Licitra and Antonio Crespo, Orlando, Florida, USA; and Thomas B. Nutman and Amy D. Klion, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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