Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 19, Number 7—July 2013

Volume 19, Number 7—July 2013   PDF Version [PDF - 6.83 MB - 155 pages]

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Transmission of Streptococcus equi Subspecies zooepidemicus Infection from Horses to Humans PDF Version [PDF - 894 KB - 8 pages]
    S. Pelkonen et al.
    View Summary

    This agent may cause severe illness in humans and should be considered an emerging zoonosis.

        View Abstract

    Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is a zoonotic pathogen for persons in contact with horses. In horses, S. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen, but human infections associated with S. zooepidemicus are often severe. Within 6 months in 2011, 3 unrelated cases of severe, disseminated S. zooepidemicus infection occurred in men working with horses in eastern Finland. To clarify the pathogen’s epidemiology, we describe the clinical features of the infection in 3 patients and compare the S. zooepidemicus isolates from the human cases with S. zooepidemicus isolates from horses. The isolates were analyzed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of the szP gene. Molecular typing methods showed that human and equine isolates were identical or closely related. These results emphasize that S. zooepidemicus transmitted from horses can lead to severe infections in humans. As leisure and professional equine sports continue to grow, this infection should be recognized as an emerging zoonosis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Pelkonen S, Lindahl SB, Suomala P, Karhukorpi J, Vuorinen S, Koivula I, et al. Transmission of Streptococcus equi Subspecies zooepidemicus Infection from Horses to Humans. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1041-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121365
    AMA Pelkonen S, Lindahl SB, Suomala P, et al. Transmission of Streptococcus equi Subspecies zooepidemicus Infection from Horses to Humans. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1041-1048. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121365.
    APA Pelkonen, S., Lindahl, S. B., Suomala, P., Karhukorpi, J., Vuorinen, S., Koivula, I....Tuuminen, T. (2013). Transmission of Streptococcus equi Subspecies zooepidemicus Infection from Horses to Humans. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1041-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121365.

Research

  • Travel-associated Illness Trends and Clusters, 2000–2010 PDF Version [PDF - 1.41 MB - 9 pages]
    K. Leder et al.
    View Summary

    Enteric fever, dengue, and rabies are increasing; malaria is decreasing; and malaria, dengue, and enteric fever were detected in clusters.

        View Abstract

    Longitudinal data examining travel-associated illness patterns are lacking. To address this need and determine trends and clusters in travel-related illness, we examined data for 2000–2010, prospectively collected for 42,223 ill travelers by 18 GeoSentinel sites. The most common destinations from which ill travelers returned were sub-Saharan Africa (26%), Southeast Asia (17%), south-central Asia (15%), and South America (10%). The proportion who traveled for tourism decreased significantly, and the proportion who traveled to visit friends and relatives increased. Among travelers returning from malaria-endemic regions, the proportionate morbidity (PM) for malaria decreased; in contrast, the PM trends for enteric fever and dengue (excluding a 2002 peak) increased. Case clustering was detected for malaria (Africa 2000, 2007), dengue (Thailand 2002, India 2003), and enteric fever (Nepal 2009). This multisite longitudinal analysis highlights the utility of sentinel surveillance of travelers for contributing information on disease activity trends and an evidence base for travel medicine recommendations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Leder K, Torresi J, Brownstein JS, Wilson ME, Keystone JS, Barnett E, et al. Travel-associated Illness Trends and Clusters, 2000–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1049-1073. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121573
    AMA Leder K, Torresi J, Brownstein JS, et al. Travel-associated Illness Trends and Clusters, 2000–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1049-1073. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121573.
    APA Leder, K., Torresi, J., Brownstein, J. S., Wilson, M. E., Keystone, J. S., Barnett, E....Freedman, D. O. (2013). Travel-associated Illness Trends and Clusters, 2000–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1049-1073. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121573.
  • Quantifying Effect of Geographic Location on Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria PDF Version [PDF - 455 KB - 8 pages]
    A. A. Lover and R. J. Coker
    View Summary

    Regional variations should be considered in patient care, surveillance, and control programs.

        View Abstract

    Recent autochthonous transmission of Plasmodium vivax malaria in previously malaria-free temperate regions has generated renewed interest in the epidemiology of this disease. Accurate estimates of the incubation period and time to relapse are required for effective malaria surveillance; however, this information is currently lacking. By using historical data from experimental human infections with diverse P. vivax strains, survival analysis models were used to obtain quantitative estimates of the incubation period and time to first relapse for P. vivax malaria in broad geographic regions. Results show that Eurasian strains from temperate regions have longer incubation periods, and Western Hemisphere strains from tropical and temperate regions have longer times to relapse compared with Eastern Hemisphere strains. The diversity in these estimates of key epidemiologic parameters for P. vivax supports the need for elucidating local epidemiology to inform clinical follow-up and to build an evidence base toward global elimination of malaria.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lover AA, Coker RJ. Quantifying Effect of Geographic Location on Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1058-1065. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121674
    AMA Lover AA, Coker RJ. Quantifying Effect of Geographic Location on Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1058-1065. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121674.
    APA Lover, A. A., & Coker, R. J. (2013). Quantifying Effect of Geographic Location on Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1058-1065. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121674.
  • Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus PDF Version [PDF - 663 KB - 8 pages]
    B. N. Licitra et al.
    View Summary

    Feline Coronavirus spike proteolytic requirement modifications may facilitate development of novel diagnostic and vaccine strategies against human strains.

        View Abstract

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses.

        Cite This Article
    EID Licitra BN, Millet JK, Regan AD, Hamilton BS, Rinaldi VD, Duhamel GE, et al. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1066-1073. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121094
    AMA Licitra BN, Millet JK, Regan AD, et al. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1066-1073. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121094.
    APA Licitra, B. N., Millet, J. K., Regan, A. D., Hamilton, B. S., Rinaldi, V. D., Duhamel, G. E....Whittaker, G. R. (2013). Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1066-1073. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121094.
  • Pneumococcal Serotypes before and after Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines, United States, 1999–2011 PDF Version [PDF - 506 KB - 10 pages]
    S. S. Richter et al.
    View Summary

    Monitoring of serotypes causing disease provides insight into pathogenesis and vaccine composition.

        View Abstract

    Serotyping data for pneumococci causing invasive and noninvasive disease in 2008–2009 and 2010–2011 from >43 US centers were compared with data from preconjugate vaccine (1999–2000) and postconjugate vaccine (2004–2005) periods. Prevalence of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes decreased from 64% of invasive and 50% of noninvasive isolates in 1999–2000 to 3.8% and 4.2%, respectively, in 2010–2011. Increases in serotype 19A stopped after introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) in 2010. Prevalences of other predominant serotypes included in or related to PCV13 (3, 6C, 7F) also remained similar for 2008–2009 and 2010–2011. The only major serotype that increased from 2008–2009 to 2010–2011 was nonvaccine serotype 35B. These data show that introduction of the 7-valent vaccine has dramatically decreased prevalence of its serotypes and that addition of serotypes in PCV13 could provide coverage of 39% of isolates that continue to cause disease.

        Cite This Article
    EID Richter SS, Heilmann KP, Dohrn CL, Riahi F, Diekema DJ, Doern GV, et al. Pneumococcal Serotypes before and after Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines, United States, 1999–2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1074-1083. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121830
    AMA Richter SS, Heilmann KP, Dohrn CL, et al. Pneumococcal Serotypes before and after Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines, United States, 1999–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1074-1083. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121830.
    APA Richter, S. S., Heilmann, K. P., Dohrn, C. L., Riahi, F., Diekema, D. J., & Doern, G. V. (2013). Pneumococcal Serotypes before and after Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines, United States, 1999–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1074-1083. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121830.
  • Influence of Pneumococcal Vaccines and Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Alveolar Pneumonia, Israel PDF Version [PDF - 991 KB - 8 pages]
    D. M. Weinberger et al.
    View Summary

    Year-to-year fluctuations in RSV bias estimates of vaccine impact in young children in the first few years after vaccine introduction.

        View Abstract

    Postlicensure surveillance of pneumonia incidence can be used to estimate whether pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) affect incidence. We used Poisson regression models that control for baseline seasonality to determine the impact of PCVs and the possible effects of variations in virus activity in Israel on these surveillance estimates. PCV was associated with significant declines in radiologically confirmed alveolar pneumonia (RCAP) among patients <6 months, 6–17 months, and 18–35 months of age (–31% [95% CI –51% to –15%], –41% [95% CI –52 to –32%], and –34% [95% CI –42% to –25%], respectively). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity was associated with strong increases in RCAP incidence, with up to 44% of cases attributable to RSV among infants <6 months of age and lower but significant impacts in older children. Seasonal variations, particularly in RSV activity, masked the impact of 7-valent PCVs, especially for young children in the first 2 years after vaccine introduction.

        Cite This Article
    EID Weinberger DM, Givon-Lavi N, Shemer-Avni Y, Bar-Ziv J, Alonso WJ, Greenberg D, et al. Influence of Pneumococcal Vaccines and Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Alveolar Pneumonia, Israel. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1084-1091. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121625
    AMA Weinberger DM, Givon-Lavi N, Shemer-Avni Y, et al. Influence of Pneumococcal Vaccines and Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Alveolar Pneumonia, Israel. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1084-1091. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121625.
    APA Weinberger, D. M., Givon-Lavi, N., Shemer-Avni, Y., Bar-Ziv, J., Alonso, W. J., Greenberg, D....Dagan, R. (2013). Influence of Pneumococcal Vaccines and Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Alveolar Pneumonia, Israel. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1084-1091. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121625.

Dispatches

  • Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China PDF Version [PDF - 302 KB - 3 pages]
    L. Wei et al.
        View Abstract

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wei L, Zhu S, Yan X, Wang J, Zhang C, Liu S, et al. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1092-1094. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121126
    AMA Wei L, Zhu S, Yan X, et al. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1092-1094. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121126.
    APA Wei, L., Zhu, S., Yan, X., Wang, J., Zhang, C., Liu, S....Liu, J. (2013). Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1092-1094. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121126.
  • Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan PDF Version [PDF - 329 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Usubalieva et al.
        View Abstract

    Human echinococcosis is a reportable disease in Kyrgyzstan. Between 1995 and 2011, human alveolar echinococcosis increased from <3 cases per year to >60 cases per year. The origins of this epidemic, which started in 2004, may be linked to the socioeconomic changes that followed the dissolution of the former Soviet Union.

        Cite This Article
    EID Usubalieva J, Minbaeva G, Ziadinov I, Deplazes P, Torgerson PR. Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1095-1097. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121405
    AMA Usubalieva J, Minbaeva G, Ziadinov I, et al. Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1095-1097. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121405.
    APA Usubalieva, J., Minbaeva, G., Ziadinov, I., Deplazes, P., & Torgerson, P. R. (2013). Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1095-1097. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121405.
  • Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela PDF Version [PDF - 492 KB - 4 pages]
    M. Segovia et al.
        View Abstract

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing.

        Cite This Article
    EID Segovia M, Carrasco HJ, Martínez CE, Messenger LA, Nessi A, Londoño JC, et al. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1098-1101. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121576
    AMA Segovia M, Carrasco HJ, Martínez CE, et al. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1098-1101. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121576.
    APA Segovia, M., Carrasco, H. J., Martínez, C. E., Messenger, L. A., Nessi, A., Londoño, J. C....Llewellyn, M. S. (2013). Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1098-1101. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121576.
  • Unique Clone of Coxiella burnetii Causing Severe Q Fever, French Guiana PDF Version [PDF - 364 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Mahamat et al.
        View Abstract

    Acute Q fever is an emergent and severe disease in French Guiana. We obtained 5 Coxiella burnetii isolates from samples of patients from Cayenne and found an epidemic clone circulating in Cayenne. This clone has caused pneumonia and endocarditis and seems to be more virulent than previously described strains.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mahamat A, Edouard S, Demar M, Abboud P, Patrice J, La Scola B, et al. Unique Clone of Coxiella burnetii Causing Severe Q Fever, French Guiana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1102-1104. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130044
    AMA Mahamat A, Edouard S, Demar M, et al. Unique Clone of Coxiella burnetii Causing Severe Q Fever, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1102-1104. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130044.
    APA Mahamat, A., Edouard, S., Demar, M., Abboud, P., Patrice, J., La Scola, B....Raoult, D. (2013). Unique Clone of Coxiella burnetii Causing Severe Q Fever, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1102-1104. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130044.
  • Babesia microti Infection, Eastern Pennsylvania, USA PDF Version [PDF - 380 KB - 3 pages]
    M. E. Acosta et al.
        View Abstract

    Infection with Babesia microti has not been well-described in eastern Pennsylvania, USA, despite the vector of this organism being prevalent. We report 3 cases of babesiosis in eastern Pennsylvania in persons without recent travel outside the region or history of blood transfusions, suggesting emergence of this infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Acosta ME, Ender PT, Smith EM, Jahre JA. Babesia microti Infection, Eastern Pennsylvania, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1105-1107. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121593
    AMA Acosta ME, Ender PT, Smith EM, et al. Babesia microti Infection, Eastern Pennsylvania, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1105-1107. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121593.
    APA Acosta, M. E., Ender, P. T., Smith, E. M., & Jahre, J. A. (2013). Babesia microti Infection, Eastern Pennsylvania, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1105-1107. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121593.
  • Reemergence of Chikungunya Virus in Bo, Sierra Leone PDF Version [PDF - 760 KB - 3 pages]
    R. Ansumana et al.
        View Abstract

    We diagnosed 400 possible IgM-positive cases of chikungunya virus in Bo, Sierra Leone, during July 2012–January 2013 by using lateral flow immunoassays. Cases detected likely represent only a small fraction of total cases. Further laboratory testing is required to confirm this outbreak and characterize the virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Leski TA, Covington AL, Bangura U, Hodges MH, et al. Reemergence of Chikungunya Virus in Bo, Sierra Leone. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1108-1110. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121563
    AMA Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Leski TA, et al. Reemergence of Chikungunya Virus in Bo, Sierra Leone. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1108-1110. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121563.
    APA Ansumana, R., Jacobsen, K. H., Leski, T. A., Covington, A. L., Bangura, U., Hodges, M. H....Stenger, D. A. (2013). Reemergence of Chikungunya Virus in Bo, Sierra Leone. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1108-1110. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121563.
  • Novel Bartonella Agent as Cause of Verruga Peruana PDF Version [PDF - 513 KB - 4 pages]
    D. L. Blazes et al.
        View Abstract

    While studying chronic verruga peruana infections in Peru from 2003, we isolated a novel Bartonella agent, which we propose be named Candidatus Bartonella ancashi. This case reveals the inherent weakness of relying solely on clinical syndromes for diagnosis and underscores the need for a new diagnostic paradigm in developing settings.

        Cite This Article
    EID Blazes DL, Mullins K, Smoak BL, Jiang J, Canal E, Solorzano N, et al. Novel Bartonella Agent as Cause of Verruga Peruana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1111-1114. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121718
    AMA Blazes DL, Mullins K, Smoak BL, et al. Novel Bartonella Agent as Cause of Verruga Peruana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1111-1114. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121718.
    APA Blazes, D. L., Mullins, K., Smoak, B. L., Jiang, J., Canal, E., Solorzano, N....Laughlin, L. (2013). Novel Bartonella Agent as Cause of Verruga Peruana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1111-1114. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121718.
  • Schmallenberg Virus among Female Lambs, Belgium, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 297 KB - 3 pages]
    F. Claine et al.
        View Abstract

    Reemergence of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) occurred among lambs (n = 50) in a sheep flock in Belgium between mid-July and mid-October 2012. Bimonthly assessment by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and seroneutralization demonstrated that 100% of lambs were infected. Viremia duration may be longer in naturally infected than in experimentally infected animals.

        Cite This Article
    EID Claine F, Coupeau D, Wiggers L, Muylkens B, Kirschvink N. Schmallenberg Virus among Female Lambs, Belgium, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1115-1117. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121768
    AMA Claine F, Coupeau D, Wiggers L, et al. Schmallenberg Virus among Female Lambs, Belgium, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1115-1117. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121768.
    APA Claine, F., Coupeau, D., Wiggers, L., Muylkens, B., & Kirschvink, N. (2013). Schmallenberg Virus among Female Lambs, Belgium, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1115-1117. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121768.
  • Psychrobacter arenosus Bacteremia after Blood Transfusion, France PDF Version [PDF - 312 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Caspar et al.
        View Abstract

    We report a case of transfusion-associated bacteremia caused by Psychrobacter arenosus. This psychrotolerant bacterium was previously isolated in 2004 from coastal sea ice and sediments in the Sea of Japan, but not from humans. P. arenosus should be considered a psychrotolerant bacterial species that can cause transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections.

        Cite This Article
    EID Caspar Y, Recule C, Pouzol P, Lafeuillade B, Mallaret M, Maurin M, et al. Psychrobacter arenosus Bacteremia after Blood Transfusion, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1118-1120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121599
    AMA Caspar Y, Recule C, Pouzol P, et al. Psychrobacter arenosus Bacteremia after Blood Transfusion, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1118-1120. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121599.
    APA Caspar, Y., Recule, C., Pouzol, P., Lafeuillade, B., Mallaret, M., Maurin, M....Croize, J. (2013). Psychrobacter arenosus Bacteremia after Blood Transfusion, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1118-1120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121599.
  • Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada PDF Version [PDF - 465 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Agunos et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2005–2010, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance identified increased prevalence of ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone) resistance among Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken in British Columbia (4%–17%) and Saskatchewan (6%–11%), Canada. Fluoroquinolones are critically important to human medicine and are not labeled for use in poultry in Canada.

        Cite This Article
    EID Agunos A, Léger D, Avery BP, Parmley E, Deckert A, Carson CA, et al. Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1121-1124. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.111417
    AMA Agunos A, Léger D, Avery BP, et al. Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1121-1124. doi:10.3201/eid1907.111417.
    APA Agunos, A., Léger, D., Avery, B. P., Parmley, E., Deckert, A., Carson, C. A....Dutil, L. (2013). Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1121-1124. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.111417.
  • Asynchronous Onset of Clinical Disease in BSE-Infected Macaques PDF Version [PDF - 358 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Montag et al.
        View Abstract

    To estimate the effect of the variability of prion disease onset on primary bovine spongiform encephalopathy transmission to humans, we studied 6 cynomolgus macaques. The preclinical incubation period was significantly prolonged in 2 animals, implying that onset of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans could be more diverse than previously expected.

        Cite This Article
    EID Montag J, Schulz-Schaeffer W, Schrod A, Hunsmann G, Motzkus D. Asynchronous Onset of Clinical Disease in BSE-Infected Macaques. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1125-1127. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120438
    AMA Montag J, Schulz-Schaeffer W, Schrod A, et al. Asynchronous Onset of Clinical Disease in BSE-Infected Macaques. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1125-1127. doi:10.3201/eid1907.120438.
    APA Montag, J., Schulz-Schaeffer, W., Schrod, A., Hunsmann, G., & Motzkus, D. (2013). Asynchronous Onset of Clinical Disease in BSE-Infected Macaques. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1125-1127. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120438.
  • Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Clinics, United Kingdom, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 296 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Seddon et al.
        View Abstract

    Incidence of pulmonary infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing among persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). We assessed prevalence and management in CF centers in the United Kingdom and found 5.0% of 3,805 adults and 3.3% of 3,317 children had recently been diagnosed with NTM. Of those, 44% of adults and 47% of children received treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Seddon P, Fidler K, Raman S, Wyatt H, Ruiz G, Elston C, et al. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Clinics, United Kingdom, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1128-1130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120615
    AMA Seddon P, Fidler K, Raman S, et al. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Clinics, United Kingdom, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1128-1130. doi:10.3201/eid1907.120615.
    APA Seddon, P., Fidler, K., Raman, S., Wyatt, H., Ruiz, G., Elston, C....Newport, M. (2013). Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Clinics, United Kingdom, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1128-1130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120615.
  • Reducing Visceral Leishmaniasis by Insecticide Impregnation of Bed-Nets, Bangladesh PDF Version [PDF - 411 KB - 4 pages]
    D. Mondal et al.
        View Abstract

    The effect of insecticide-treated materials on reducing visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is disputable. In Bangladesh, we evaluated the effect of a community-based intervention with insecticide impregnation of existing bed-nets in reducing VL incidence. This intervention reduced VL by 66.5%. Widespread bed-net impregnation with slow-release insecticide may control VL in Bangladesh.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mondal D, Huda M, Karmoker M, Ghosh D, Matlashewski G, Nabi S, et al. Reducing Visceral Leishmaniasis by Insecticide Impregnation of Bed-Nets, Bangladesh. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1131-1134. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120932
    AMA Mondal D, Huda M, Karmoker M, et al. Reducing Visceral Leishmaniasis by Insecticide Impregnation of Bed-Nets, Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1131-1134. doi:10.3201/eid1907.120932.
    APA Mondal, D., Huda, M., Karmoker, M., Ghosh, D., Matlashewski, G., Nabi, S....Kroeger, A. (2013). Reducing Visceral Leishmaniasis by Insecticide Impregnation of Bed-Nets, Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1131-1134. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120932.
  • Genetic Variants of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Domestic Rodents, Northern China PDF Version [PDF - 345 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Zhang et al.
        View Abstract

    We screened Orientia tsutsugamushi from 385 domestic rodents and 19 humans with scrub typhus in rural Tai’an District, Shandong Province, a new scrub typhus epidemic area in northern China. Sequence analysis identified 7 genotypes in the rodents, of which 2 were also identified in the humans.

        Cite This Article
    EID Zhang M, Zhao Z, Wang X, Li Z, Ding L, Ding S, et al. Genetic Variants of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Domestic Rodents, Northern China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1135-1137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120984
    AMA Zhang M, Zhao Z, Wang X, et al. Genetic Variants of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Domestic Rodents, Northern China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1135-1137. doi:10.3201/eid1907.120984.
    APA Zhang, M., Zhao, Z., Wang, X., Li, Z., Ding, L., Ding, S....Yang, H. (2013). Genetic Variants of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Domestic Rodents, Northern China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1135-1137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120984.
  • Undetected Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Amplified by First-line Therapy in Mixed Infection PDF Version [PDF - 411 KB - 4 pages]
    S. M. Hingley-Wilson et al.
        View Abstract

    Infections with >1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain(s) are underrecognized. We show, in vitro and in vivo, how first-line treatment conferred a competitive growth advantage to amplify a multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain in a patient with mixed infection. Diagnostic techniques that identify mixed tubercle bacilli populations are needed to curb the spread of multidrug resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hingley-Wilson SM, Casey R, Connell D, Bremang S, Evans JT, Hawkey PM, et al. Undetected Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Amplified by First-line Therapy in Mixed Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1138-1141. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130313
    AMA Hingley-Wilson SM, Casey R, Connell D, et al. Undetected Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Amplified by First-line Therapy in Mixed Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1138-1141. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130313.
    APA Hingley-Wilson, S. M., Casey, R., Connell, D., Bremang, S., Evans, J. T., Hawkey, P. M....Lalvani, A. (2013). Undetected Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Amplified by First-line Therapy in Mixed Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1138-1141. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130313.
  • Clinical Findings for Early Human Cases of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection, Shanghai, China PDF Version [PDF - 540 KB - 5 pages]
    S. Lu et al.
        View Abstract

    A novel strain of influenza A(H7N9) virus has emerged in China and is causing mild to severe clinical symptoms in infected humans. Some case-patients have died. To further knowledge of this virus, we report the characteristics and clinical histories of 4 early case-patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lu S, Zheng Y, Li T, Hu Y, Liu X, Xi X, et al. Clinical Findings for Early Human Cases of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection, Shanghai, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1142-1146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130612
    AMA Lu S, Zheng Y, Li T, et al. Clinical Findings for Early Human Cases of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection, Shanghai, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1142-1146. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130612.
    APA Lu, S., Zheng, Y., Li, T., Hu, Y., Liu, X., Xi, X....Bao, J. (2013). Clinical Findings for Early Human Cases of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection, Shanghai, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1142-1146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130612.
  • Multidrug-Resistant Atypical Variants of Shigella flexneri in China PDF Version [PDF - 968 KB - 4 pages]
    S. Qiu et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified 3 atypical Shigella flexneri varieties in China, including 92 strains with multidrug resistance, distinct pulse types, and a novel sequence type. Atypical varieties were prevalent mainly in developed regions, and 1 variant has become the dominant Shigella spp. serotype in China. Improved surveillance will help guide the prevention and control of shigellosis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Qiu S, Wang Y, Xu X, Li P, Hao R, Yang C, et al. Multidrug-Resistant Atypical Variants of Shigella flexneri in China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1147-1150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.111221
    AMA Qiu S, Wang Y, Xu X, et al. Multidrug-Resistant Atypical Variants of Shigella flexneri in China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1147-1150. doi:10.3201/eid1907.111221.
    APA Qiu, S., Wang, Y., Xu, X., Li, P., Hao, R., Yang, C....Song, H. (2013). Multidrug-Resistant Atypical Variants of Shigella flexneri in China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1147-1150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.111221.

Letters

  • MDR TB Transmission, Singapore PDF Version [PDF - 300 KB - 2 pages]
    C. Chee et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chee C, Hsu L, Sng L, Leo Y, Cutter J, Wang Y, et al. MDR TB Transmission, Singapore. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1151-1152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120372
    AMA Chee C, Hsu L, Sng L, et al. MDR TB Transmission, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1151-1152. doi:10.3201/eid1907.120372.
    APA Chee, C., Hsu, L., Sng, L., Leo, Y., Cutter, J., & Wang, Y. (2013). MDR TB Transmission, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1151-1152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.120372.
  • Human Infection with Marten Tapeworm PDF Version [PDF - 332 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Eberwein et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Eberwein P, Haeupler A, Kuepper F, Wagner D, Kern WV, Muntau B, et al. Human Infection with Marten Tapeworm. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1152-1154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121114
    AMA Eberwein P, Haeupler A, Kuepper F, et al. Human Infection with Marten Tapeworm. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1152-1154. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121114.
    APA Eberwein, P., Haeupler, A., Kuepper, F., Wagner, D., Kern, W. V., Muntau, B....Poppert, S. (2013). Human Infection with Marten Tapeworm. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1152-1154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121114.
  • Campylobacter jejuni in Hospitalized Patients with Diarrhea, Kolkata, India PDF Version [PDF - 295 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Mukherjee et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mukherjee P, Ramamurthy T, Bhattacharya MK, Rajendran K, Mukhopadhyay AK. Campylobacter jejuni in Hospitalized Patients with Diarrhea, Kolkata, India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1155-1156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121278
    AMA Mukherjee P, Ramamurthy T, Bhattacharya MK, et al. Campylobacter jejuni in Hospitalized Patients with Diarrhea, Kolkata, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1155-1156. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121278.
    APA Mukherjee, P., Ramamurthy, T., Bhattacharya, M. K., Rajendran, K., & Mukhopadhyay, A. K. (2013). Campylobacter jejuni in Hospitalized Patients with Diarrhea, Kolkata, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1155-1156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121278.
  • Verona Integron–encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase 1 in Enterobacteria, Ontario, Canada PDF Version [PDF - 336 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Tijet et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Tijet N, Macmullin G, Lastovetska O, Vermeiren C, Wenzel P, Stacey-Works T, et al. Verona Integron–encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase 1 in Enterobacteria, Ontario, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1156-1158. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121294
    AMA Tijet N, Macmullin G, Lastovetska O, et al. Verona Integron–encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase 1 in Enterobacteria, Ontario, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1156-1158. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121294.
    APA Tijet, N., Macmullin, G., Lastovetska, O., Vermeiren, C., Wenzel, P., Stacey-Works, T....Melano, R. G. (2013). Verona Integron–encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase 1 in Enterobacteria, Ontario, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1156-1158. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121294.
  • Novel Bat-borne Hantavirus, Vietnam PDF Version [PDF - 330 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Arai et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Arai S, Nguyen S, Boldgiv B, Fukui D, Araki K, Dang C, et al. Novel Bat-borne Hantavirus, Vietnam. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1159-1161. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121549
    AMA Arai S, Nguyen S, Boldgiv B, et al. Novel Bat-borne Hantavirus, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1159-1161. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121549.
    APA Arai, S., Nguyen, S., Boldgiv, B., Fukui, D., Araki, K., Dang, C....Oishi, K. (2013). Novel Bat-borne Hantavirus, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1159-1161. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121549.
  • Possible Cause of Liver Failure in Patient with Dengue Shock Syndrome PDF Version [PDF - 276 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Khongphatthanayothin et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Khongphatthanayothin A, Mahayosnond A, Poovorawan Y. Possible Cause of Liver Failure in Patient with Dengue Shock Syndrome. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1161-1163. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121820
    AMA Khongphatthanayothin A, Mahayosnond A, Poovorawan Y. Possible Cause of Liver Failure in Patient with Dengue Shock Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1161-1163. doi:10.3201/eid1907.121820.
    APA Khongphatthanayothin, A., Mahayosnond, A., & Poovorawan, Y. (2013). Possible Cause of Liver Failure in Patient with Dengue Shock Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1161-1163. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.121820.
  • Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Questing Ticks, Central Spain PDF Version [PDF - 319 KB - 3 pages]
    I. G. Fernández de Mera et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Fernández de Mera IG, Ruiz-Fons F, de la Fuente G, Mangold AJ, Gortázar C, de la Fuente J, et al. Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Questing Ticks, Central Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1163-1165. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130005
    AMA Fernández de Mera IG, Ruiz-Fons F, de la Fuente G, et al. Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Questing Ticks, Central Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1163-1165. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130005.
    APA Fernández de Mera, I. G., Ruiz-Fons, F., de la Fuente, G., Mangold, A. J., Gortázar, C., & de la Fuente, J. (2013). Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Questing Ticks, Central Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1163-1165. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130005.
  • Neonatal Granulicatella elegans Bacteremia, London, UK PDF Version [PDF - 267 KB - 2 pages]
    L. Quartermain et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Quartermain L, Tailor H, Njenga S, Bhattacharjee P, Rao G. Neonatal Granulicatella elegans Bacteremia, London, UK. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1165-1166. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130009
    AMA Quartermain L, Tailor H, Njenga S, et al. Neonatal Granulicatella elegans Bacteremia, London, UK. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1165-1166. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130009.
    APA Quartermain, L., Tailor, H., Njenga, S., Bhattacharjee, P., & Rao, G. (2013). Neonatal Granulicatella elegans Bacteremia, London, UK. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1165-1166. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130009.
  • Bartonella Species in Raccoons and Feral Cats, Georgia, USA PDF Version [PDF - 288 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Hwang and N. L. Gottdenker
            Cite This Article
    EID Hwang J, Gottdenker NL. Bartonella Species in Raccoons and Feral Cats, Georgia, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1167-1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130010
    AMA Hwang J, Gottdenker NL. Bartonella Species in Raccoons and Feral Cats, Georgia, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1167-1168. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130010.
    APA Hwang, J., & Gottdenker, N. L. (2013). Bartonella Species in Raccoons and Feral Cats, Georgia, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1167-1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130010.
  • Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG–Induced Disease in HIV-Infected Infant, Vietnam PDF Version [PDF - 269 KB - 3 pages]
    D. Hong et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Hong D, Huyen M, Lan N, Duong N, Ngo V, Ngoc D, et al. Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG–Induced Disease in HIV-Infected Infant, Vietnam. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130025
    AMA Hong D, Huyen M, Lan N, et al. Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG–Induced Disease in HIV-Infected Infant, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1168. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130025.
    APA Hong, D., Huyen, M., Lan, N., Duong, N., Ngo, V., Ngoc, D....Godreuil, S. (2013). Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG–Induced Disease in HIV-Infected Infant, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130025.
  • Bulleidia extructa Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection, United States PDF Version [PDF - 262 KB - 2 pages]
    B. Kloesel et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Kloesel B, Beliveau M, Patel R, Trousdale RT, Sia IG. Bulleidia extructa Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1170-1171. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130078
    AMA Kloesel B, Beliveau M, Patel R, et al. Bulleidia extructa Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1170-1171. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130078.
    APA Kloesel, B., Beliveau, M., Patel, R., Trousdale, R. T., & Sia, I. G. (2013). Bulleidia extructa Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1170-1171. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130078.
  • Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Zealand, Denmark, 2011 PDF Version [PDF - 333 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Fomsgaard et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Fomsgaard A, Fertner ME, Essbauer S, Nielsen AY, Frey S, Lindblom P, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Zealand, Denmark, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1171-1173. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130092
    AMA Fomsgaard A, Fertner ME, Essbauer S, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Zealand, Denmark, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1171-1173. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130092.
    APA Fomsgaard, A., Fertner, M. E., Essbauer, S., Nielsen, A. Y., Frey, S., Lindblom, P....Dobler, G. (2013). Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Zealand, Denmark, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1171-1173. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130092.
  • Usutu Virus in Migratory Song Thrushes, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 323 KB - 3 pages]
    U. Höfle et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Höfle U, Gamino V, de Mera IG, Mangold AJ, Ortíz J, de la Fuente J, et al. Usutu Virus in Migratory Song Thrushes, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1173-1175. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130199
    AMA Höfle U, Gamino V, de Mera IG, et al. Usutu Virus in Migratory Song Thrushes, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1173-1175. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130199.
    APA Höfle, U., Gamino, V., de Mera, I. G., Mangold, A. J., Ortíz, J., & de la Fuente, J. (2013). Usutu Virus in Migratory Song Thrushes, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1173-1175. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130199.
  • Rickettsia aeschlimannii Infection in a Man, Greece PDF Version [PDF - 268 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Germanakis et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Germanakis A, Chochlakis D, Angelakis E, Tselentis Y, Psaroulaki A. Rickettsia aeschlimannii Infection in a Man, Greece. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1176-1177. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130232
    AMA Germanakis A, Chochlakis D, Angelakis E, et al. Rickettsia aeschlimannii Infection in a Man, Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1176-1177. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130232.
    APA Germanakis, A., Chochlakis, D., Angelakis, E., Tselentis, Y., & Psaroulaki, A. (2013). Rickettsia aeschlimannii Infection in a Man, Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1176-1177. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130232.
  • Antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle, Mozambique PDF Version [PDF - 270 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Lagerqvist et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lagerqvist N, Moiane B, Mapaco L, Fafetine J, Vene S, Falk KI, et al. Antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle, Mozambique. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1177-1179. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130332
    AMA Lagerqvist N, Moiane B, Mapaco L, et al. Antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle, Mozambique. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1177-1179. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130332.
    APA Lagerqvist, N., Moiane, B., Mapaco, L., Fafetine, J., Vene, S., & Falk, K. I. (2013). Antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle, Mozambique. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1177-1179. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130332.
  • Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections, Shanghai, China PDF Version [PDF - 360 KB - 3 pages]
    Z. Mei et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mei Z, Lu S, Wu X, Shao L, Hui Y, Wang J, et al. Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections, Shanghai, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1179-1181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130523
    AMA Mei Z, Lu S, Wu X, et al. Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections, Shanghai, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1179-1181. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130523.
    APA Mei, Z., Lu, S., Wu, X., Shao, L., Hui, Y., Wang, J....Zhang, W. (2013). Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections, Shanghai, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1179-1181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130523.

Books and Media

  • The Stealth Virus PDF Version [PDF - 241 KB - 1 page]
    J. W. Tang
            Cite This Article
    EID Tang JW. The Stealth Virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1182. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130027
    AMA Tang JW. The Stealth Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1182. doi:10.3201/eid1907.130027.
    APA Tang, J. W. (2013). The Stealth Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1182. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.130027.

About the Cover

  • Summer Buzz PDF Version [PDF - 268 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. Summer Buzz. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1184. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.AC1907
    AMA Potter P. Summer Buzz. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1184. doi:10.3201/eid1907.AC1907.
    APA Potter, P. (2013). Summer Buzz. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1184. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.AC1907.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Verona Integron PDF Version [PDF - 304 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Etymologia: Verona Integron. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(7):1181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.ET1907
    AMA Etymologia: Verona Integron. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(7):1181. doi:10.3201/eid1907.ET1907.
    APA (2013). Etymologia: Verona Integron. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(7), 1181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1907.ET1907.

Online Reports

  • Peer Reviewed Report Available Online Only
    Influence of Humans on Evolution and Mobilization of Environmental Antibiotic Resistome
    W. H. Gaze et al.
        View Abstract

    The clinical failure of antimicrobial drugs that were previously effective in controlling infectious disease is a tragedy of increasing magnitude that gravely affects human health. This resistance by pathogens is often the endpoint of an evolutionary process that began billions of years ago in non–disease-causing microorganisms. This environmental resistome, its mobilization, and the conditions that facilitate its entry into human pathogens are at the heart of the current public health crisis in antibiotic resistance. Understanding the origins, evolution, and mechanisms of transfer of resistance elements is vital to our ability to adequately address this public health issue.

       
TOP