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Volume 19, Number 8—August 2013

Dispatch

Macrolide Resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, South Korea, 2000–2011

Ki Bae Hong, Eun Hwa ChoiComments to Author , Hoan Jong Lee, Seong Yeon Lee, Eun Young Cho, Jae Hong Choi, Hyun Mi Kang, Jina Lee, Young Min Ahn, Yeon-Ho Kang, and Joon-Ho Lee
Author affiliations: Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea (K.B. Hong, E.H. Choi, H.J. Lee, S.Y. Lee, E.Y. Cho, J.H. Choi, H.M. Kang); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (E.H. Choi, H.J. Lee); Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea (J. Lee); Seoul Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Y.M. Ahn); Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul (Y.-H. Kang); Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon, South Korea (J.-H. Lee)

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Figure

Increased prevalence of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains isolated from children during epidemics of lower respiratory tract infections, South Korea, 2000–2011. During the 2000 epidemic, 0 of 30 strains were resistant, but during the epidemics of 2003 and 2006, 1 of 34 and 10 of 68 strains, respectively, showed resistance. During the 2010–2011 outbreak, 25 of 53 (2010) and 44 of 70 (2011) strains were resistant. Numbers on the bars are the percentages of resistant strains for

Figure. . Increased prevalence of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains isolated from children during epidemics of lower respiratory tract infections, South Korea, 2000–2011. During the 2000 epidemic, 0 of 30 strains were resistant, but during the epidemics of 2003 and 2006, 1 of 34 and 10 of 68 strains, respectively, showed resistance. During the 2010–2011 outbreak, 25 of 53 (2010) and 44 of 70 (2011) strains were resistant. Numbers on the bars are the percentages of resistant strains for each year.

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