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Volume 20, Number 3—March 2014

Research

Hendra Virus Vaccine, a One Health Approach to Protecting Horse, Human, and Environmental Health

Deborah Middleton1Comments to Author , Jackie Pallister1, Reuben Klein, Yan-Ru Feng, Jessica Haining, Rachel Arkinstall, Leah Frazer, Jin-An Huang, Nigel Edwards, Mark Wareing, Martin Elhay, Zia Hashmi, John Bingham, Manabu Yamada, Dayna Johnson, John White, Adam Foord, Hans G. Heine, Glenn A. Marsh, Christopher C. Broder, and Lin-Fa Wang
Author affiliations: CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia (D. Middleton, J. Pallister, R. Klein, J. Haining, R. Arkinstall, L. Frazer, J. Bingham, D. Johnson, J. White, A. Foord, H.G. Heine, G.A. Marsh, L.-F. Wang); Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (Y.-R. Feng, C.C. Broder); Zoetis Research & Manufacturing Pty Ltd, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (J.-A. Huang, N. Edwards, M. Wareing, M. Elhay, Z. Hashmi); National Institute of Animal Health, Ibaraki, Japan (M. Yamada); Duke–NUS (Duke and the National University of Singapore) Graduate Medical School, Singapore (L.-F. Wang)

Main Article

Figure 1

Histologic and immunohistologic findings in Hendra virus–infected horse tissue. A) hematoxylin and eosin staining shows systemic vasculitis affecting the lung. B) Immunohistologic examination, using polyclonal rabbit anti-Nipah N protein, indicates Hendra virus antigen in a blood vessel in the brain. Scale bar represent 50 μm.

Figure 1. Histologic and immunohistologic findings in Hendra virus–infected horse tissueA) Hematoxylin and eosin staining shows systemic vasculitis affecting the lungB) Immunohistologic examination, using polyclonal rabbit anti-Nipah N protein, indicates Hendra virus antigen in a blood vessel in the brainScale bars represent 50 μm.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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