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Volume 5, Number 3—June 1999

Perspective

Bacterial Vaccines and Serotype Replacement: Lessons from Haemophilus influenzae and Prospects for Streptococcus pneumoniae

Marc LipsitchComments to Author 
Author affiliation: Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Figure 2

Carriage of three serotypes of Haemophilus influenzae in children vaccinated against serotype b (black bars) and in controls (white bars) (14). Error bars indicate 95% confidence interval (binomial approximation). Shaded bars show the maximum carriage of serotypes e and f in vaccine recipients that could result from replacement in a population where only a small proportion of susceptibles are vaccinated (as in the study). Striped bars show the equivalent figures in a hypothetical study in which

Figure 2. Carriage of three serotypes of Haemophilus influenzae in children vaccinated against serotype b (black bars) and in controls (white bars) (14). Error bars indicate 95% confidence interval (binomial approximation). Shaded bars show the maximum carriage of serotypes e and f in vaccine recipients that could result from replacement in a population where only a small proportion of susceptibles are vaccinated (as in the study). Striped bars show the equivalent figures in a hypothetical study in which virtually all susceptibles were vaccinated.

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