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Volume 5, Number 4—August 1999
THEME ISSUE
Bioterrorism

Perspective

Potential Biological Weapons Threats

Mark G. Kortepeter and Gerald W. Parker
Author affiliations: U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Maryland, USA

Main Article

Table

Biological agents involved in bioterrorism or biocrimesa

Traditional biological warfare agents Agents associated with biocrimes and bioterrorism
Pathogens Bacillus anthracisb Ascaris suum
Brucella suis Bacillus anthracisb
Coxiella burnetiib Coxiella burnetiib
Francisella tularensis Giardia lamblia
Smallpox HIV
Viral encephalitides Rickettsia prowazekii
Viral hemorrhagic feversb (typhus)
Yersinia pestisb Salmonella Typhimurium
Salmonella typhi
Shigella species
Schistosoma species
Vibrio cholerae
Viral hemorrhagic
fevers (Ebola)b
Yellow fever virus
Yersinia enterocolitica
Yersinia pestisb
Toxins Botulinumb Botulinumb
Ricinb Cholera endotoxin
Staphylococcal enterotoxin B Diphtheria toxin
Nicotine
Ricinb
Snake toxin
Tetrodotoxin
Anti-crop agents Rice blast
Rye stem rust
Wheat stem rust

aIncludes agents which were used, acquired, attempted to acquire, involved in a threat of use or an expressed interest in using. Reprinted with permission from Carus WS. Table 6: Biological agents involved. In: Carus WS. Bioterrorism and biocrimes: the illicit use of biological agents in the 20th Century. Working Paper, Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University. August 1998, revised March 1999.
bThese agents appear on both lists.

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