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Volume 8, Number 4—April 2002

Research

Introduction of West Nile Virus in the Middle East by Migrating White Storks

Mertyn Malkinson*Comments to Author , Caroline Banet*, Yoram Weisman*, Shimon Pokamunski†, Roni King‡, Vincent Deubel§, and Marie-Thrse Drouet
Author affiliations: *Kimron Veterinary Institute, Beit Dagan, Israel; †Veterinary Services and Animal Health, Beit Dagan, Israel; ‡Nature and Parks Authority, Jerusalem, Israel; §Pasteur Institute, Lyon, France;

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Table 1

Monoclonal antibodies used characterization of goose, stork, and gull isolates study, Israel, 1998 and 1999

MAb Reactivity Reference
2B4 WNV-type specific (E gene) 15
6B8 WNV-type specific (E gene) 15
6E12 WNV-type specific except KUN (NS4a gene) 15
5F10 WNV specific Bat-El Lachmi
1C9 Flaviviruses Bat-El Lachmi
1B4 Flaviviruses Bat-El Lachmi
F7/101 West Nile 16
6D12 Flaviviruses except Edge Hill and Dengue virus 17
3H6 Murray Valley encephalitis virus (Flavivirus) 17
813 Yellow fever virus (Flavivirus) 18
30.11 SINV 19
30.12 SINV 19
2F2 SINV a

WNV=West Nile virus; SINV=Sindbis virus.
aTropBio, Townsville

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