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Volume 9, Number 10—October 2003

Perspective

Syndromic Surveillance and Bioterrorism-related Epidemics

James W. Buehler*Comments to Author , Ruth L. Berkelman*, David M. Hartley†, and Clarence J. Peters‡
Author affiliations: *Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Number of cases of syndromic illness by time in a hypothetical bioterrorism attack and two pathways to establishing a diagnosis: syndromic surveillance coupled with public health investigation (upper pathway) and clinical and diagnostic evaluation of patients with short-incubation period disease (lower pathway). A, scenario favoring earlier detection by means of clinical evaluation. B, scenario favoring earlier detection by means of syndromic surveillance.

Figure 1. Number of cases of syndromic illness by time in a hypothetical bioterrorism attack and two pathways to establishing a diagnosis: syndromic surveillance coupled with public health investigation (upper pathway) and clinical and diagnostic evaluation of patients with short-incubation period disease (lower pathway). A, scenario favoring earlier detection by means of clinical evaluation. B, scenario favoring earlier detection by means of syndromic surveillance.

Main Article

1For interval calculations, if reported event dates were discrepant in different case reports, dates reported by Jernigan et al. (13) were used.

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