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Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Viral Encephalitis in England, 1989–1998: What Did We Miss?

Katy L. Davison*Comments to Author , Natasha S. Crowcroft*, Mary E. Ramsay*, David W.G. Brown†, and Nick J Andrews*
Author affiliations: *Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London, United Kingdom; †Public Health Laboratory Service Virus Reference Division, London, United Kingdom

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Table 3

Hospitalizations of viral encephalitis, deaths, and duration of stay, England, April 1, 1989–March 31, 1998a

Diagnosis No. of cases No. of deaths (%) Case-fatality rate/100 cases 95% CI Length of stay in days 95% CI
Exotic
64
1 (0.2)
1.6
0.01 to 8.6
16.5
7.5 to 25.5
Herpes viruses






Herpes simplex virus
1,419
141 (33.8)
10
8.4 to 11.6
26.6
23.6 to 29.6
VZV
333
25 (6.0)
7.6
4.9 to 10.9
11.8
10.0 to 13.4
Others






Measles
86
1 (0.2)
1.2
0.01 to 6.3
6.8
3.1 to 10.5
Mumps
30
1 (0.2)
3.3
0.01 to 15.8
4.1
2.9 to 5.3
Rubella
26
2 (0.5)
7.7
0.9 to 25.1
76.0
0.0 to 174.0
LCMV
7
0 (0.0)
0

7.2
2.1 to 12.3
Adenoviruses
129
6 (1.4)
4.7
1.8 to 9.8
8.5
6.8 to 10.2
Other
480
33 (7.9)
6.8
4.7 to 9.4
18.8
12.4 to 25.1
Unspecified viral infection
3,840
207 (49.6)
5.5
4.7 to 6.2
14.8
13.7 to 15.9
Total 6,414 417 (100) 6.5 5.9 to 7.1 17.5 16.4 to 18.6

aCI, confidence interval; VZV, varicella-zoster virus 1; LCMV, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

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