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Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Viral Encephalitis in England, 1989–1998: What Did We Miss?

Katy L. Davison*Comments to Author , Natasha S. Crowcroft*, Mary E. Ramsay*, David W.G. Brown†, and Nick J Andrews*
Author affiliations: *Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London, United Kingdom; †Public Health Laboratory Service Virus Reference Division, London, United Kingdom

Main Article

Table 4

A comparison of cases and deaths attributed to viral encephalitis with a specific diagnosis identified through hospital episode statistics, the laboratory reporting system, and the Office of National Statistics, Englanda

Diagnosis Cases
Deaths
HESb Laboratory reportsb Estimate of underreporting in laboratory reports (%) HESc ONSc Estimate of underreporting in laboratory reports (%)
Herpes
1,308
353
73
85
104
22
VZV
325
124
62
24
34
42
Measles
71
43
39
0
1
0
Mumps
18
13
28
2
0
100
Rubella
23
1
96
0
0
0
LCMV
7
0
100
0
0
0
Adenoviruses
115
24
79
1
0
100
Total 1,867 558 70 112 139 24

aHES, hospital episode statistics; Herpes, herpes simplex virus; VZV, varicella-zoster virus 1; LCMV, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

bJanuary 1, 1990–March 31, 1998.

cJanuary 1, 1993–March 31, 1998.

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