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Another Dimension

Thoughtful essays, short stories, or poems on philosophical issues related to science, medical practice, and human health. Topics may include science and the human condition, the unanticipated side of epidemic investigations, or how people perceive and cope with infections and illness.

Volume 19—2013

Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013 cover of the CDC's EID journal
Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness PDF Version [PDF - 424 KB - 5 pages]
M. Nasiruddin et al.
    View Abstract

Sitting at his laboratory bench, a scientist adds mutation after mutation to a strand of rabies virus RNA, unaware that in a few short days, an outbreak of this very mutation would destroy society as we know it. It could be called “Zombie Rabies,” a moniker befitting of the next Hollywood blockbuster—or, in this case, a representation of the debate over whether a zombie apocalypse, manufactured by genetically modifying one or more diseases like rabies, could be more than just fiction. Fear of the unknown has long been a psychological driving force for curiosity, and the concept of a zombie apocalypse has become popular in modern society. This article explores the utility of zombies to capitalize on the benefits of spreading public health awareness through the use of relatable popular culture tools and scientific explanations for fictional phenomena.

    Cite This Article
EID Nasiruddin M, Halabi M, Dao A, Chen K, Brown B. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):809-813. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AD1905
AMA Nasiruddin M, Halabi M, Dao A, et al. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):809-813. doi:10.3201/eid1905.AD1905.
APA Nasiruddin, M., Halabi, M., Dao, A., Chen, K., & Brown, B. (2013). Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 809-813. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AD1905.

Volume 19, Number 4—April 2013

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 19, Number 4—April 2013 cover of the CDC's EID journal
Myth Dispelled PDF Version [PDF - 199 KB - 1 page]
A. Possner
        Cite This Article
EID Possner A. Myth Dispelled. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(4):664. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1904.AD1904
AMA Possner A. Myth Dispelled. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(4):664. doi:10.3201/eid1904.AD1904.
APA Possner, A. (2013). Myth Dispelled. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(4), 664. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1904.AD1904.

Volume 19, Number 3—March 2013

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 19, Number 3—March 2013 cover of the CDC's EID journal
HUS Surveillance Notes—Sarah’s Story PDF Version [PDF - 1.84 MB - 2 pages]
K. Pollock
        Cite This Article
EID Pollock K. HUS Surveillance Notes—Sarah’s Story. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(3):500-501. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1903.AD1903
AMA Pollock K. HUS Surveillance Notes—Sarah’s Story. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(3):500-501. doi:10.3201/eid1903.AD1903.
APA Pollock, K. (2013). HUS Surveillance Notes—Sarah’s Story. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(3), 500-501. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1903.AD1903.

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