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Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013

Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013   PDF Version [PDF - 7.91 MB - 156 pages]

Research

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains, Alberta, Canada, 1991–2007
    D. Langlois-Klassen et al.
    View Summary

    Transmission of Beijing strains posed no more of a public health threat than did non-Beijing strains.

        View Abstract

    Beijing strains are speculated to have a selective advantage over other Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains because of increased transmissibility and virulence. In Alberta, a province of Canada that receives a large number of immigrants, we conducted a population-based study to determine whether Beijing strains were associated with increased transmission leading to disease compared with non-Beijing strains. Beijing strains accounted for 258 (19%) of 1,379 pulmonary tuberculosis cases in 1991–2007; overall, 21% of Beijing cases and 37% of non-Beijing cases were associated with transmission clusters. Beijing index cases had significantly fewer secondary cases within 2 years than did non-Beijing cases, but this difference disappeared after adjustment for demographic characteristics, infectiousness, and M. tuberculosis lineage. In a province that has effective tuberculosis control, transmission of Beijing strains posed no more of a public health threat than did non-Beijing strains.

        Cite This Article
    EID Langlois-Klassen D, Senthilselvan A, Chui L, Kunimoto D, Saunders L, Menzies D, et al. Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains, Alberta, Canada, 1991–2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):701-711. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121578
    AMA Langlois-Klassen D, Senthilselvan A, Chui L, et al. Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains, Alberta, Canada, 1991–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):701-711. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121578.
    APA Langlois-Klassen, D., Senthilselvan, A., Chui, L., Kunimoto, D., Saunders, L., Menzies, D....Long, R. (2013). Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains, Alberta, Canada, 1991–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 701-711. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121578.
  • Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates PDF Version [PDF - 2.71 MB - 9 pages]
    E. Holznagel et al.
    View Summary

    A single oral dose infected all macaques, and multiple doses prolonged incubation times.

        View Abstract

    Risk for human exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)–inducing agent was estimated in a nonhuman primate model. To determine attack rates, incubation times, and molecular signatures, we orally exposed 18 macaques to 1 high dose of brain material from cattle with BSE. Several macaques were euthanized at regular intervals starting at 1 year postinoculation, and others were observed until clinical signs developed. Among those who received ≥5 g BSE-inducing agent, attack rates were 100% and prions could be detected in peripheral tissues from 1 year postinoculation onward. The overall median incubation time was 4.6 years (3.7–5.3). However, for 3 macaques orally exposed on multiple occasions, incubation periods were at least 7–10 years. Before clinical signs were noted, we detected a non-type 2B signature, indicating the existence of atypical prion protein during the incubation period. This finding could affect diagnosis of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and might be relevant for retrospective studies of positive tonsillectomy or appendectomy specimens because time of infection is unknown.

        Cite This Article
    EID Holznagel E, Yutzy B, Schulz-Schaeffer W, Kruip C, Hahmann U, Bierke P, et al. Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):712-720. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120274
    AMA Holznagel E, Yutzy B, Schulz-Schaeffer W, et al. Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):712-720. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120274.
    APA Holznagel, E., Yutzy, B., Schulz-Schaeffer, W., Kruip, C., Hahmann, U., Bierke, P....Loewer, J. (2013). Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 712-720. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120274.
  • Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France PDF Version [PDF - 2.89 MB - 8 pages]
    M. Piarroux et al.
        View Abstract

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups.

        Cite This Article
    EID Piarroux M, Piarroux R, Knapp J, Bardonnet K, Dumortier J, Watelet J, et al. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):721-728. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120867
    AMA Piarroux M, Piarroux R, Knapp J, et al. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):721-728. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120867.
    APA Piarroux, M., Piarroux, R., Knapp, J., Bardonnet, K., Dumortier, J., Watelet, J....Gaudart, J. (2013). Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 721-728. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120867.
  • World Health Organization International Standard to Harmonize Assays for Detection of Hepatitis E Virus RNA PDF Version [PDF - 939 KB - 7 pages]
    S. A. Baylis et al.
        View Abstract

    Nucleic acid amplification technique–based assays are a primary method for the detection of acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, but assay sensitivity can vary widely. To improve interlaboratory results for the detection and quantification of HEV RNA, a candidate World Health Organization (WHO) International Standard (IS) strain was evaluated in a collaborative study involving 23 laboratories from 10 countries. The IS, code number 6329/10, was formulated by using a genotype 3a HEV strain from a blood donation, diluted in pooled human plasma and lyophilized. A Japanese national standard, representing a genotype 3b HEV strain, was prepared and evaluated in parallel. The potencies of the standards were determined by qualitative and quantitative assays. Assay variability was substantially reduced when HEV RNA concentrations were expressed relative to the IS. Thus, WHO has established 6329/10 as the IS for HEV RNA, with a unitage of 250,000 International Units per milliliter.

        Cite This Article
    EID Baylis SA, Blümel J, Mizusawa S, Matsubayashi K, Sakata H, Okada Y, et al. World Health Organization International Standard to Harmonize Assays for Detection of Hepatitis E Virus RNA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):729-735. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121845
    AMA Baylis SA, Blümel J, Mizusawa S, et al. World Health Organization International Standard to Harmonize Assays for Detection of Hepatitis E Virus RNA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):729-735. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121845.
    APA Baylis, S. A., Blümel, J., Mizusawa, S., Matsubayashi, K., Sakata, H., Okada, Y....Hanschmann, K. O. (2013). World Health Organization International Standard to Harmonize Assays for Detection of Hepatitis E Virus RNA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 729-735. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121845.
  • Full-Genome Deep Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Human Betacoronavirus PDF Version [PDF - 1.06 MB - 9 pages]
    M. Cotten et al.
        View Abstract

    A novel betacoronavirus associated with lethal respiratory and renal complications was recently identified in patients from several countries in the Middle East. We report the deep genome sequencing of the virus directly from a patient’s sputum sample. Our high-throughput sequencing yielded a substantial depth of genome sequence assembly and showed the minority viral variants in the specimen. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the virus genome (England/Qatar/2012) revealed its close relationship to European bat coronaviruses circulating among the bat species of the Vespertilionidae family. Molecular clock analysis showed that the 2 human infections of this betacoronavirus in June 2012 (EMC/2012) and September 2012 (England/Qatar/2012) share a common virus ancestor most likely considerably before early 2012, suggesting the human diversity is the result of multiple zoonotic events.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cotten M, Lam TT, Watson SJ, Palser AL, Petrova V, Grant P, et al. Full-Genome Deep Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Human Betacoronavirus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):736-742. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130057
    AMA Cotten M, Lam TT, Watson SJ, et al. Full-Genome Deep Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Human Betacoronavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):736-742. doi:10.3201/eid1905.130057.
    APA Cotten, M., Lam, T. T., Watson, S. J., Palser, A. L., Petrova, V., Grant, P....Nastouli, E. (2013). Full-Genome Deep Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Human Betacoronavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 736-742. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130057.
  • Targeting Surveillance for Zoonotic Virus Discovery PDF Version [PDF - 5.30 MB - 5 pages]
    J. Levinson et al.
        View Abstract

    We analyzed a database of mammal–virus associations to ask whether surveillance targeting diseased animals is the best strategy to identify potentially zoonotic pathogens. Although a mixed healthy and diseased animal surveillance strategy is generally best, surveillance of apparently healthy animals would likely maximize zoonotic virus discovery potential for bats and rodents.

        Cite This Article
    EID Levinson J, Bogich TL, Olival KJ, Epstein JH, Johnson CK, Karesh W, et al. Targeting Surveillance for Zoonotic Virus Discovery. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):743-747. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121042
    AMA Levinson J, Bogich TL, Olival KJ, et al. Targeting Surveillance for Zoonotic Virus Discovery. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):743-747. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121042.
    APA Levinson, J., Bogich, T. L., Olival, K. J., Epstein, J. H., Johnson, C. K., Karesh, W....Daszak, P. (2013). Targeting Surveillance for Zoonotic Virus Discovery. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 743-747. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121042.
  • Changes in Severity of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection from Pandemic to First Postpandemic Season, Germany PDF Version [PDF - 723 KB - 8 pages]
    N. Lehners et al.
        View Abstract

    We studied risk factors for a severe clinical outcome in hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection at the University Hospital Heidelberg in the pandemic and first postpandemic seasons. We identified 102 patients in 2009–10 and 76 in 2010–11. The proportion of severely diseased patients dramatically increased from 14% in 2009–10 to 46% in 2010–11 as did the mortality rate (5%–12%). Patients in the first postpandemic season were significantly older (38 vs. 18 years) and more frequently had underlying medical conditions (75% vs. 51%). Overall, 50 patients (28%) had a severe clinical outcome, resulting in 14 deaths. Multivariate analysis showed that older male patients with chronic lung disease were at increased risk for a severe clinical outcome. In summary, the proportion of patients with severe disease and fatal cases increased in the postpandemic season. Therefore, patients with suspected infections should be promptly identified and receive early treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lehners N, Geis S, Eisenbach C, Neben K, Schnitzler P. Changes in Severity of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection from Pandemic to First Postpandemic Season, Germany. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):748-755. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130034
    AMA Lehners N, Geis S, Eisenbach C, et al. Changes in Severity of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection from Pandemic to First Postpandemic Season, Germany. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):748-755. doi:10.3201/eid1905.130034.
    APA Lehners, N., Geis, S., Eisenbach, C., Neben, K., & Schnitzler, P. (2013). Changes in Severity of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection from Pandemic to First Postpandemic Season, Germany. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 748-755. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130034.
  • Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus among Domesticated Animals, China PDF Version [PDF - 1.93 MB - 8 pages]
    G. Niu et al.
    View Summary

    Domesticated animals may play a role in the transmission cycles of this novel bunyavirus.

        View Abstract

    To investigate the infections of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) in domesticated animals, we sampled a total of 3,039 animals in 2 counties in Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China, from April to November 2011. SFTSV-specific antibodies were detected in 328 (69.5%) of 472 sheep, 509 (60.5%) of 842 cattle, 136 (37.9%) of 359 dogs, 26 (3.1%) of 839 pigs, and 250 (47.4%) of 527 chickens. SFTSV RNA was detected in all sampled animal species, but the prevalence was low, ranging from 1.7% to 5.3%. A cohort study in 38 sheep was conducted to determine when seroconversion to SFTSV occured. SFTSVs were isolated from sheep, cattle, and dogs and shared >95% sequence homology with human isolates from the same disease-endemic regions. These findings demonstrate that natural infections of SFTSV occur in several domesticated animal hosts in disease-endemic areas and that the virus has a wide host range.

        Cite This Article
    EID Niu G, Li J, Liang M, Jiang X, Jiang M, Yin H, et al. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus among Domesticated Animals, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):756-763. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120245
    AMA Niu G, Li J, Liang M, et al. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus among Domesticated Animals, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):756-763. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120245.
    APA Niu, G., Li, J., Liang, M., Jiang, X., Jiang, M., Yin, H....Li, D. (2013). Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus among Domesticated Animals, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 756-763. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120245.

Dispatches

  • Campylobacter coli Outbreak in Men Who Have Sex with Men, Quebec, Canada, 2010–2011 PDF Version [PDF - 1.29 MB - 4 pages]
    C. Gaudreau et al.
        View Abstract

    During September 2010–November 2011, a cluster of erythromycin-susceptible, tetracycline- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter coli pulsovar 1 infections was documented, involving 10 case-patients, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The findings suggested sexual transmission of an enteric infection among men who have sex with men.

        Cite This Article
    EID Gaudreau C, Helferty M, Sylvestre J, Allard R, Pilon PA, Poisson M, et al. Campylobacter coli Outbreak in Men Who Have Sex with Men, Quebec, Canada, 2010–2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):764-767. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121344
    AMA Gaudreau C, Helferty M, Sylvestre J, et al. Campylobacter coli Outbreak in Men Who Have Sex with Men, Quebec, Canada, 2010–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):764-767. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121344.
    APA Gaudreau, C., Helferty, M., Sylvestre, J., Allard, R., Pilon, P. A., Poisson, M....Bekal, S. (2013). Campylobacter coli Outbreak in Men Who Have Sex with Men, Quebec, Canada, 2010–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 764-767. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121344.
  • Delayed Diagnosis of Chronic Q Fever and Cardiac Valve Surgery PDF Version [PDF - 755 KB - 3 pages]
    L. M. Kampschreur et al.
        View Abstract

    Untreated chronic Q fever causes a high number of complications and deaths. We present cases of chronic Q fever that were not diagnosed until after the patients underwent cardiac valve surgery. In epidemic areas, Q fever screening of valve surgery patients secures early initiation of treatment and can prevent illness and death.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kampschreur LM, Hoornenborg E, Renders N, Oosterheert J, Haverman JF, Elsman P, et al. Delayed Diagnosis of Chronic Q Fever and Cardiac Valve Surgery. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):768-773. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120353
    AMA Kampschreur LM, Hoornenborg E, Renders N, et al. Delayed Diagnosis of Chronic Q Fever and Cardiac Valve Surgery. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):768-773. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120353.
    APA Kampschreur, L. M., Hoornenborg, E., Renders, N., Oosterheert, J., Haverman, J. F., Elsman, P....Wever, P. C. (2013). Delayed Diagnosis of Chronic Q Fever and Cardiac Valve Surgery. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 768-773. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120353.
  • Treatment of Tularemia in Patient with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease PDF Version [PDF - 2.59 MB - 3 pages]
    J. Weile et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe a case of human tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica in a stem cell transplant recipient with chronic graft-versus-host disease who was receiving levofloxacin prophylaxis. The infection was characterized by pneumonia with septic complications. The patient was successfully treated with doxycycline.

        Cite This Article
    EID Weile J, Seibold E, Knabbe C, Kaufmann M, Splettstoesser W. Treatment of Tularemia in Patient with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):771-773. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120377
    AMA Weile J, Seibold E, Knabbe C, et al. Treatment of Tularemia in Patient with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):771-773. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120377.
    APA Weile, J., Seibold, E., Knabbe, C., Kaufmann, M., & Splettstoesser, W. (2013). Treatment of Tularemia in Patient with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 771-773. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120377.
  • Scrub Typhus Outbreak, Northern Thailand, 2006–2007 PDF Version [PDF - 1.97 MB - 4 pages]
    W. Rodkvamtook et al.
        View Abstract

    During a scrub typhus outbreak investigation in Thailand, 4 isolates of O. tsutsugamushi were obtained and established in culture. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 56-kDa type-specific antigen gene demonstrated that the isolates fell into 4 genetic clusters, 3 of which had been previously reported and 1 that represents a new genotype.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rodkvamtook W, Gaywee J, Kanjanavanit S, Ruangareerate T, Richards AL, Sangjun N, et al. Scrub Typhus Outbreak, Northern Thailand, 2006–2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):774-777. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121445
    AMA Rodkvamtook W, Gaywee J, Kanjanavanit S, et al. Scrub Typhus Outbreak, Northern Thailand, 2006–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):774-777. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121445.
    APA Rodkvamtook, W., Gaywee, J., Kanjanavanit, S., Ruangareerate, T., Richards, A. L., Sangjun, N....Sirisopana, N. (2013). Scrub Typhus Outbreak, Northern Thailand, 2006–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 774-777. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121445.
  • Detecting Rickettsia parkeri Infection from Eschar Swab Specimens PDF Version [PDF - 1.18 MB - 3 pages]
    T. Myers et al.
        View Abstract

    The typical clinical presentation of several spotted fever group Rickettsia infections includes eschars. Clinical diagnosis of the condition is usually made by analysis of blood samples. We describe a more sensitive, noninvasive means of obtaining a sample for diagnosis by using an eschar swab specimen from patients infected with Rickettsia parkeri.

        Cite This Article
    EID Myers T, Lalani T, Dent M, Jiang J, Daly PL, Maguire JD, et al. Detecting Rickettsia parkeri Infection from Eschar Swab Specimens. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):778-780. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120622
    AMA Myers T, Lalani T, Dent M, et al. Detecting Rickettsia parkeri Infection from Eschar Swab Specimens. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):778-780. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120622.
    APA Myers, T., Lalani, T., Dent, M., Jiang, J., Daly, P. L., Maguire, J. D....Richards, A. L. (2013). Detecting Rickettsia parkeri Infection from Eschar Swab Specimens. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 778-780. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120622.
  • Contaminated Ventilator Air Flow Sensor Linked to Bacillus cereus Colonization of Newborns PDF Version [PDF - 760 KB - 3 pages]
    G. Turabelidze et al.
        View Abstract

    We investigated Bacillus cereus–positive tracheal aspirates from infants on ventilators in a neonatal intensive care unit. Multilocus sequence typing determined a genetic match between strains isolated from samples from a case-patient and from the air flow sensor in the ventilator. Changing the sterilization method for sensors to steam autoclaving stopped transmission.

        Cite This Article
    EID Turabelidze G, Gee JE, Hoffmaster AR, Manian F, Butler C, Byrd D, et al. Contaminated Ventilator Air Flow Sensor Linked to Bacillus cereus Colonization of Newborns. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):781-783. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120239
    AMA Turabelidze G, Gee JE, Hoffmaster AR, et al. Contaminated Ventilator Air Flow Sensor Linked to Bacillus cereus Colonization of Newborns. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):781-783. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120239.
    APA Turabelidze, G., Gee, J. E., Hoffmaster, A. R., Manian, F., Butler, C., Byrd, D....Talley, C. (2013). Contaminated Ventilator Air Flow Sensor Linked to Bacillus cereus Colonization of Newborns. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 781-783. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120239.
  • Mapping Environmental Suitability for Malaria Transmission, Greece PDF Version [PDF - 1.20 MB - 3 pages]
    B. Sudre et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2009–2012, Greece experienced a resurgence of domestic malaria transmission. To help guide malaria response efforts, we used spatial modeling to characterize environmental signatures of areas suitable for transmission. Nonlinear discriminant analysis indicated that sea-level altitude and land-surface temperature parameters are predictive in this regard.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sudre B, Rossi M, Van Bortel W, Danis K, Baka A, Vakalis N, et al. Mapping Environmental Suitability for Malaria Transmission, Greece. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):786. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120811
    AMA Sudre B, Rossi M, Van Bortel W, et al. Mapping Environmental Suitability for Malaria Transmission, Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):786. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120811.
    APA Sudre, B., Rossi, M., Van Bortel, W., Danis, K., Baka, A., Vakalis, N....Semenza, J. C. (2013). Mapping Environmental Suitability for Malaria Transmission, Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 786. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120811.
  • Implications of Dengue Outbreaks for Blood Supply, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 356 KB - 3 pages]
    H. M. Faddy et al.
        View Abstract

    Dengue outbreaks have increased in size and frequency in Australia, and transfusion-transmitted dengue poses a risk to transfusion safety. Using whole blood samples collected during the large 2008–2009 dengue epidemic, we estimated the risk for a dengue-infectious blood donation as ≈1 in 7,146 (range 2,218–50,021).

        Cite This Article
    EID Faddy HM, Seed CR, Fryk JJ, Hyland CA, Ritchie SA, Taylor CT, et al. Implications of Dengue Outbreaks for Blood Supply, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):787-789. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121664
    AMA Faddy HM, Seed CR, Fryk JJ, et al. Implications of Dengue Outbreaks for Blood Supply, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):787-789. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121664.
    APA Faddy, H. M., Seed, C. R., Fryk, J. J., Hyland, C. A., Ritchie, S. A., Taylor, C. T....McBride, W. (2013). Implications of Dengue Outbreaks for Blood Supply, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 787-789. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121664.
  • Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia PDF Version [PDF - 589 KB - 3 pages]
    M. M. Squire et al.
        View Abstract

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain.

        Cite This Article
    EID Squire MM, Carter GP, Mackin KE, Chakravorty A, Norén T, Elliott B, et al. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):790-792. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121062
    AMA Squire MM, Carter GP, Mackin KE, et al. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):790-792. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121062.
    APA Squire, M. M., Carter, G. P., Mackin, K. E., Chakravorty, A., Norén, T., Elliott, B....Riley, T. V. (2013). Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 790-792. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121062.
  • Novel Lyssavirus in Bat, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 578 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Ceballos et al.
        View Abstract

    A new tentative lyssavirus, Lleida bat lyssavirus, was found in a bent-winged bat (Miniopterus schreibersii) in Spain. It does not belong to phylogroups I or II, and it seems to be more closely related to the West Causasian bat virus, and especially to the Ikoma lyssavirus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ceballos N, Morón S, Berciano JM, Nicolás O, López C, Juste J, et al. Novel Lyssavirus in Bat, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):793-795. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121071
    AMA Ceballos N, Morón S, Berciano JM, et al. Novel Lyssavirus in Bat, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):793-795. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121071.
    APA Ceballos, N., Morón, S., Berciano, J. M., Nicolás, O., López, C., Juste, J....Echevarría, J. E. (2013). Novel Lyssavirus in Bat, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 793-795. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121071.
  • Borrelia recurrentis in Head Lice, Ethiopia PDF Version [PDF - 1.10 MB - 3 pages]
    A. Boutellis et al.
        View Abstract

    Since the 1800s, the only known vector of Borrelia recurrentis has been the body louse. In 2011, we found B. recurrentis DNA in 23% of head lice from patients with louse-borne relapsing fever in Ethiopia. Whether head lice can transmit these bacteria from one person to another remains to be determined.

        Cite This Article
    EID Boutellis A, Mediannikov O, Bilcha K, Ali J, Campelo D, Barker SC, et al. Borrelia recurrentis in Head Lice, Ethiopia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):796-798. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121480
    AMA Boutellis A, Mediannikov O, Bilcha K, et al. Borrelia recurrentis in Head Lice, Ethiopia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):796-798. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121480.
    APA Boutellis, A., Mediannikov, O., Bilcha, K., Ali, J., Campelo, D., Barker, S. C....Raoult, D. (2013). Borrelia recurrentis in Head Lice, Ethiopia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 796-798. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121480.
  • Tuberculosis Exposure among Evacuees at a Shelter after Earthquake, Japan, 2011 PDF Version [PDF - 478 KB - 3 pages]
    H. Kanamori et al.
        View Abstract

    Tuberculosis was diagnosed in a person who had stayed in a shelter after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. A contact investigation showed that the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among other evacuees at the shelter was 20%. Our report underscores the importance of tuberculosis prevention and control after natural disasters.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kanamori H, Aso N, Tadano S, Saito M, Saito H, Uchiyama B, et al. Tuberculosis Exposure among Evacuees at a Shelter after Earthquake, Japan, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):799-801. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121137
    AMA Kanamori H, Aso N, Tadano S, et al. Tuberculosis Exposure among Evacuees at a Shelter after Earthquake, Japan, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):799-801. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121137.
    APA Kanamori, H., Aso, N., Tadano, S., Saito, M., Saito, H., Uchiyama, B....Kaku, M. (2013). Tuberculosis Exposure among Evacuees at a Shelter after Earthquake, Japan, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 799-801. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121137.
  • Genetic Analysis of Primaquine Tolerance in a Patient with Relapsing Vivax Malaria PDF Version [PDF - 2.06 MB - 4 pages]
    A. Bright et al.
        View Abstract

    Patients with Plasmodium vivax malaria are treated with primaquine to prevent relapse infections. We report primaquine failure in a patient with 3 relapses without any possibility of re-infection. Using whole genome sequencing of the relapsing parasite isolates, we identified single nucleotide variants as candidate molecular markers of resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bright A, Alenazi T, Shokoples S, Tarning J, Paganotti GM, White NJ, et al. Genetic Analysis of Primaquine Tolerance in a Patient with Relapsing Vivax Malaria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):802-805. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121852
    AMA Bright A, Alenazi T, Shokoples S, et al. Genetic Analysis of Primaquine Tolerance in a Patient with Relapsing Vivax Malaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):802-805. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121852.
    APA Bright, A., Alenazi, T., Shokoples, S., Tarning, J., Paganotti, G. M., White, N. J....Yanow, S. K. (2013). Genetic Analysis of Primaquine Tolerance in a Patient with Relapsing Vivax Malaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 802-805. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121852.
  • Tick-borne Encephalitis Associated with Consumption of Raw Goat Milk, Slovenia, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 1.01 MB - 3 pages]
    N. Hudopisk et al.
        View Abstract

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) developed in 3 persons in Slovenia who drank raw milk; a fourth person, who had been vaccinated against TBE, remained healthy. TBE virus RNA was detected in serum and milk of the source goat. Persons in TBE-endemic areas should be encouraged to drink only boiled/pasteurized milk and to be vaccinated.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hudopisk N, Korva M, Janet E, Simetinger M, Grgič-Vitek M, Gubenšek J, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Associated with Consumption of Raw Goat Milk, Slovenia, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):806-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121442
    AMA Hudopisk N, Korva M, Janet E, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Associated with Consumption of Raw Goat Milk, Slovenia, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):806-808. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121442.
    APA Hudopisk, N., Korva, M., Janet, E., Simetinger, M., Grgič-Vitek, M., Gubenšek, J....Avšič-Županc, T. (2013). Tick-borne Encephalitis Associated with Consumption of Raw Goat Milk, Slovenia, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 806-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121442.

Another Dimension

  • Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness PDF Version [PDF - 424 KB - 5 pages]
    M. Nasiruddin et al.
        View Abstract

    Sitting at his laboratory bench, a scientist adds mutation after mutation to a strand of rabies virus RNA, unaware that in a few short days, an outbreak of this very mutation would destroy society as we know it. It could be called “Zombie Rabies,” a moniker befitting of the next Hollywood blockbuster—or, in this case, a representation of the debate over whether a zombie apocalypse, manufactured by genetically modifying one or more diseases like rabies, could be more than just fiction. Fear of the unknown has long been a psychological driving force for curiosity, and the concept of a zombie apocalypse has become popular in modern society. This article explores the utility of zombies to capitalize on the benefits of spreading public health awareness through the use of relatable popular culture tools and scientific explanations for fictional phenomena.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nasiruddin M, Halabi M, Dao A, Chen K, Brown B. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):809-813. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AD1905
    AMA Nasiruddin M, Halabi M, Dao A, et al. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):809-813. doi:10.3201/eid1905.AD1905.
    APA Nasiruddin, M., Halabi, M., Dao, A., Chen, K., & Brown, B. (2013). Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 809-813. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AD1905.

Letters

  • Plasmodium falciparum with Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Duplications, Senegal PDF Version [PDF - 290 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Pascual et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Pascual A, Fall B, Wurtz N, Fall M, Camara C, Nakoulima A, et al. Plasmodium falciparum with Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Duplications, Senegal. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):814-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121603
    AMA Pascual A, Fall B, Wurtz N, et al. Plasmodium falciparum with Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Duplications, Senegal. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):814-815. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121603.
    APA Pascual, A., Fall, B., Wurtz, N., Fall, M., Camara, C., Nakoulima, A....Pradines, B. (2013). Plasmodium falciparum with Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Duplications, Senegal. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 814-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121603.
  • Atypical Erythema Migrans in Patients with PCR-Positive Lyme Disease PDF Version [PDF - 789 KB - 3 pages]
    S. E. Schutzer et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Schutzer SE, Berger BW, Krueger JG, Eshoo MW, Ecker DJ, Aucott JN, et al. Atypical Erythema Migrans in Patients with PCR-Positive Lyme Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):815-817. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120796
    AMA Schutzer SE, Berger BW, Krueger JG, et al. Atypical Erythema Migrans in Patients with PCR-Positive Lyme Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):815-817. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120796.
    APA Schutzer, S. E., Berger, B. W., Krueger, J. G., Eshoo, M. W., Ecker, D. J., & Aucott, J. N. (2013). Atypical Erythema Migrans in Patients with PCR-Positive Lyme Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 815-817. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120796.
  • Brucellosis in Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China, 2005–2010 PDF Version [PDF - 353 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Chen et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chen J, Ke C, Deng X, Jiang S, Liang W, Ke B, et al. Brucellosis in Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China, 2005–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):818. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120146
    AMA Chen J, Ke C, Deng X, et al. Brucellosis in Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China, 2005–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):818. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120146.
    APA Chen, J., Ke, C., Deng, X., Jiang, S., Liang, W., Ke, B....Liu, M. (2013). Brucellosis in Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China, 2005–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 818. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120146.
  • Cutaneous Mycobacterium shigaense Infection in Immunocompetent Woman, China PDF Version [PDF - 1.30 MB - 2 pages]
    P. Cui et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cui P, Vissa V, Li W, Zhang X, Lin L, Wang H, et al. Cutaneous Mycobacterium shigaense Infection in Immunocompetent Woman, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):819-820. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121022
    AMA Cui P, Vissa V, Li W, et al. Cutaneous Mycobacterium shigaense Infection in Immunocompetent Woman, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):819-820. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121022.
    APA Cui, P., Vissa, V., Li, W., Zhang, X., Lin, L., Wang, H....Zong, W. (2013). Cutaneous Mycobacterium shigaense Infection in Immunocompetent Woman, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 819-820. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121022.
  • Infectious Disease Surveillance by Medical Examiners and Coroners PDF Version [PDF - 288 KB - 2 pages]
    D. M. Blau et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Blau DM, Clark SC, Nolte KB. Infectious Disease Surveillance by Medical Examiners and Coroners. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):821-822. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121661
    AMA Blau DM, Clark SC, Nolte KB. Infectious Disease Surveillance by Medical Examiners and Coroners. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):821-822. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121661.
    APA Blau, D. M., Clark, S. C., & Nolte, K. B. (2013). Infectious Disease Surveillance by Medical Examiners and Coroners. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 821-822. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121661.
  • Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone, France PDF Version [PDF - 428 KB - 2 pages]
    R. A. Bonnin et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Bonnin RA, Cuzon G, Poirel L, Nordmann P. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):822-823. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121618
    AMA Bonnin RA, Cuzon G, Poirel L, et al. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):822-823. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121618.
    APA Bonnin, R. A., Cuzon, G., Poirel, L., & Nordmann, P. (2013). Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 822-823. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121618.
  • Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Definitive Phage Type 104 PDF Version [PDF - 455 KB - 3 pages]
    H. Izumiya et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Izumiya H, Terajima J, Yamamoto S, Ohnishi M, Watanabe H, Kai A, et al. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Definitive Phage Type 104. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):823-825. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121395
    AMA Izumiya H, Terajima J, Yamamoto S, et al. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Definitive Phage Type 104. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):823-825. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121395.
    APA Izumiya, H., Terajima, J., Yamamoto, S., Ohnishi, M., Watanabe, H., Kai, A....Tamura, Y. (2013). Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Definitive Phage Type 104. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 823-825. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121395.
  • Single Genotype of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Identified from Ticks, Camargue, France PDF Version [PDF - 649 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Chastagner et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chastagner A, Bailly X, Leblond A, Pradier S, Vourc’h G. Single Genotype of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Identified from Ticks, Camargue, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):825-827. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121003
    AMA Chastagner A, Bailly X, Leblond A, et al. Single Genotype of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Identified from Ticks, Camargue, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):825-827. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121003.
    APA Chastagner, A., Bailly, X., Leblond, A., Pradier, S., & Vourc’h, G. (2013). Single Genotype of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Identified from Ticks, Camargue, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 825-827. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121003.
  • West Nile Virus Lineage 2 Strain in Greece, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 413 KB - 3 pages]
    S. C. Chaintoutis et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chaintoutis SC, Chaskopoulou A, Chassalevris T, Koehler PG, Papanastassopoulou M, Dovas CI, et al. West Nile Virus Lineage 2 Strain in Greece, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121418
    AMA Chaintoutis SC, Chaskopoulou A, Chassalevris T, et al. West Nile Virus Lineage 2 Strain in Greece, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):829. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121418.
    APA Chaintoutis, S. C., Chaskopoulou, A., Chassalevris, T., Koehler, P. G., Papanastassopoulou, M., & Dovas, C. I. (2013). West Nile Virus Lineage 2 Strain in Greece, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121418.
  • Reindeer Warble Fly–associated Human Myiasis, Scandinavia PDF Version [PDF - 345 KB - 3 pages]
    B. Kan et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Kan B, Åsbakk K, Fossen K, Nilssen A, Panadero R, Otranto D, et al. Reindeer Warble Fly–associated Human Myiasis, Scandinavia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130145
    AMA Kan B, Åsbakk K, Fossen K, et al. Reindeer Warble Fly–associated Human Myiasis, Scandinavia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):830-832. doi:10.3201/eid1905.130145.
    APA Kan, B., Åsbakk, K., Fossen, K., Nilssen, A., Panadero, R., & Otranto, D. (2013). Reindeer Warble Fly–associated Human Myiasis, Scandinavia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130145.
  • Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Iran PDF Version [PDF - 337 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Seyedmousavi et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Seyedmousavi S, Hashemi S, Zibafar E, Zoll J, Hedayati MT, Mouton JW, et al. Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Iran. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):832-834. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130075
    AMA Seyedmousavi S, Hashemi S, Zibafar E, et al. Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Iran. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):832-834. doi:10.3201/eid1905.130075.
    APA Seyedmousavi, S., Hashemi, S., Zibafar, E., Zoll, J., Hedayati, M. T., Mouton, J. W....Verweij, P. E. (2013). Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Iran. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 832-834. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.130075.
  • Search for Possible Additional Reservoirs for Human Q Fever, the Netherlands PDF Version [PDF - 442 KB - 2 pages]
    H. Roest et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Roest H, van Solt CB, Tilburg J, Klaassen C, Hovius EK, Roest F, et al. Search for Possible Additional Reservoirs for Human Q Fever, the Netherlands. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):834-835. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121489
    AMA Roest H, van Solt CB, Tilburg J, et al. Search for Possible Additional Reservoirs for Human Q Fever, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):834-835. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121489.
    APA Roest, H., van Solt, C. B., Tilburg, J., Klaassen, C., Hovius, E. K., Roest, F....van Zijderveld, F. G. (2013). Search for Possible Additional Reservoirs for Human Q Fever, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 834-835. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121489.
  • Scalp Eschar and Neck Lymphadenopathy Caused by Rickettsia massiliae PDF Version [PDF - 573 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Cascio et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cascio A, Torina A, Valenzise M, Blanda V, Camarda N, Bombaci S, et al. Scalp Eschar and Neck Lymphadenopathy Caused by Rickettsia massiliae. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):836-837. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121169
    AMA Cascio A, Torina A, Valenzise M, et al. Scalp Eschar and Neck Lymphadenopathy Caused by Rickettsia massiliae. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):836-837. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121169.
    APA Cascio, A., Torina, A., Valenzise, M., Blanda, V., Camarda, N., Bombaci, S....Wasniewska, M. (2013). Scalp Eschar and Neck Lymphadenopathy Caused by Rickettsia massiliae. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 836-837. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121169.
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Remains of 18th–19th Century Slaves, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 348 KB - 3 pages]
    L. H. Jaeger et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Jaeger LH, de Souza S, Dias OF, Iñiguez AM. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Remains of 18th–19th Century Slaves, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):837-839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120193
    AMA Jaeger LH, de Souza S, Dias OF, et al. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Remains of 18th–19th Century Slaves, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):837-839. doi:10.3201/eid1905.120193.
    APA Jaeger, L. H., de Souza, S., Dias, O. F., & Iñiguez, A. M. (2013). Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Remains of 18th–19th Century Slaves, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 837-839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.120193.
  • Treatment of Listeriosis in First Trimester of Pregnancy PDF Version [PDF - 358 KB - 3 pages]
    B. T. Chan et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chan BT, Hohmann E, Barshak M, Pukkila-Worley R. Treatment of Listeriosis in First Trimester of Pregnancy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):839-841. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121397
    AMA Chan BT, Hohmann E, Barshak M, et al. Treatment of Listeriosis in First Trimester of Pregnancy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):839-841. doi:10.3201/eid1905.121397.
    APA Chan, B. T., Hohmann, E., Barshak, M., & Pukkila-Worley, R. (2013). Treatment of Listeriosis in First Trimester of Pregnancy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 839-841. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.121397.

In Memoriam

  • In Memoriam: Alexander I. Klimov (1943–2013) PDF Version [PDF - 470 KB - 1 page]
    B. Mahy
            Cite This Article
    EID Mahy B. In Memoriam: Alexander I. Klimov (1943–2013). Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):842. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.IM0266
    AMA Mahy B. In Memoriam: Alexander I. Klimov (1943–2013). Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):842. doi:10.3201/eid1905.IM0266.
    APA Mahy, B. (2013). In Memoriam: Alexander I. Klimov (1943–2013). Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 842. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.IM0266.
  • In Memoriam: Susumu Hotta (1918–2011) PDF Version [PDF - 700 KB - 2 pages]
    E. Konishi and G. Kuno
            Cite This Article
    EID Konishi E, Kuno G. In Memoriam: Susumu Hotta (1918–2011). Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):843-844. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.IM0986
    AMA Konishi E, Kuno G. In Memoriam: Susumu Hotta (1918–2011). Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):843-844. doi:10.3201/eid1905.IM0986.
    APA Konishi, E., & Kuno, G. (2013). In Memoriam: Susumu Hotta (1918–2011). Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 843-844. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.IM0986.

About the Cover

  • Imagining Sisyphus Happy PDF Version [PDF - 1.46 MB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. Imagining Sisyphus Happy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):846-847. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AC1905
    AMA Potter P. Imagining Sisyphus Happy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):846-847. doi:10.3201/eid1905.AC1905.
    APA Potter, P. (2013). Imagining Sisyphus Happy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 846-847. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.AC1905.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Acinetobacter PDF Version [PDF - 313 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(5):841. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.ET1905
    AMA Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013;19(5):841. doi:10.3201/eid1905.ET1905.
    APA (2013). Etymologia: Acinetobacter. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(5), 841. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1905.ET1905.
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