Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010

Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010   PDF Version [PDF - 4.36 MB - 159 pages]

Research

  • Latent Tuberculosis among Persons at Risk for Infection with HIV, Tijuana, Mexico PDF Version [PDF - 210 KB - 7 pages]
    R. S. Garfein et al.
        View Abstract

    Because there is little routine tuberculosis (TB) screening in Mexico, the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) is unknown. In the context of an increasing HIV epidemic in Tijuana, Mexico, understanding prevalence of LTBI to anticipate emergence of increased LTBI reactivation is critical. Therefore, we recruited injection drug users, noninjection drug users, female sex workers, and homeless persons for a study involving risk assessment, rapid HIV testing, and TB screening. Of 503 participants, the overall prevalences of TB infection, HIV infection, and TB/HIV co-infection were 57%, 4.2%, and 2.2%, respectively; no significant differences by risk group (p>0.05) were observed. Two participants had TB (prevalence 398/100,000). Incarceration in Mexico (odds ratio [OR] 2.28), age (OR 1.03 per year), and years lived in Tijuana (OR 1.02 per year) were independently associated with TB infection (p<0.05). Frequent LTBI in marginalized persons may lead to increases in TB as HIV spreads.

        Cite This Article
    EID Garfein RS, Laniado-Laborin R, Rodwell TC, Lozada R, Deiss RG, Burgos JL, et al. Latent Tuberculosis among Persons at Risk for Infection with HIV, Tijuana, Mexico. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):757-763. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091446
    AMA Garfein RS, Laniado-Laborin R, Rodwell TC, et al. Latent Tuberculosis among Persons at Risk for Infection with HIV, Tijuana, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):757-763. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091446.
    APA Garfein, R. S., Laniado-Laborin, R., Rodwell, T. C., Lozada, R., Deiss, R. G., Burgos, J. L....Strathdee, S. A. (2010). Latent Tuberculosis among Persons at Risk for Infection with HIV, Tijuana, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 757-763. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091446.
  • Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China PDF Version [PDF - 230 KB - 5 pages]
    L. Zhan et al.
        View Abstract

    To characterize the strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in wild and domestic animals in China, we isolated the organism from rodents and sheep in northeastern China. We isolated 3 strains (2 from rodents and 1 from sick sheep) through propagation in BALB/c mice and then cell culture in HL60 cells. The 3 isolates were identified by Wright-Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence, and electronic microscopy and were characterized by sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, partial citrate synthase gene, major surface protein 4 gene, and heat shock protein gene. The multiple sequences of the 3 isolates were identical to each other but different from all known strains from other countries. The public health and veterinary relevance of the isolates deserves further investigation.

        Cite This Article
    EID Zhan L, Liu W, Jiang J, Zhang X, Liu Y, Wu X, et al. Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):764-768. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091293
    AMA Zhan L, Liu W, Jiang J, et al. Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):764-768. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091293.
    APA Zhan, L., Liu, W., Jiang, J., Zhang, X., Liu, Y., Wu, X....Habbema, J. D. (2010). Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 764-768. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091293.
  • Spread of Adenovirus to Geographically Dispersed Military Installations, May–October 2007 PDF Version [PDF - 282 KB - 7 pages]
    J. S. Trei et al.
        View Abstract

    In mid-May 2007, a respiratory disease outbreak associated with adenovirus, serotype B14 (Ad14), was recognized at a large military basic training facility in Texas. The affected population was highly mobile; after the 6-week basic training course, trainees immediately dispersed to advanced training sites worldwide. Accordingly, enhanced surveillance and control efforts were instituted at sites receiving the most trainees. Specimens from patients with pneumonia or febrile respiratory illness were tested for respiratory pathogens by using cultures and reverse transcription–PCR. During May through October 2007, a total of 959 specimens were collected from 21 sites; 43.1% were adenovirus positive; the Ad14 serotype accounted for 95.3% of adenovirus isolates. Ad14 was identified at 8 sites in California, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and South Korea. Ad14 spread readily to secondary sites after the initial outbreak. Military and civilian planners must consider how best to control the spread of infectious respiratory diseases in highly mobile populations traveling between diverse geographic locations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Trei JS, Johns NM, Garner JL, Noel LB, Ortman BV, Ensz KL, et al. Spread of Adenovirus to Geographically Dispersed Military Installations, May–October 2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):769-775. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091633
    AMA Trei JS, Johns NM, Garner JL, et al. Spread of Adenovirus to Geographically Dispersed Military Installations, May–October 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):769-775. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091633.
    APA Trei, J. S., Johns, N. M., Garner, J. L., Noel, L. B., Ortman, B. V., Ensz, K. L....Gaydos, J. C. (2010). Spread of Adenovirus to Geographically Dispersed Military Installations, May–October 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 769-775. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091633.
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Tropheryma whipplei in Children with Gastroenteritis PDF Version [PDF - 340 KB - 7 pages]
    D. Raoult et al.
        View Abstract

    Tropheryma whipplei, which causes Whipple disease, is found in human feces and may cause gastroenteritis. To show that T. whipplei causes gastroenteritis, PCRs for T. whipplei were conducted with feces from children 2–4 years of age. Western blotting was performed for samples from children with diarrhea who had positive or negative results for T. whipplei. T. whipplei was found in samples from 36 (15%) of 241 children with gastroenteritis and associated with other diarrheal pathogens in 13 (33%) of 36. No positive specimen was detected for controls of the same age (0/47; p = 0.008). Bacterial loads in case-patients were as high as those in patients with Whipple disease and significantly higher than those in adult asymptomatic carriers (p = 0.002). High incidence in patients and evidence of clonal circulation suggests that some cases of gastroenteritis are caused or exacerbated by T. whipplei, which may be co-transmitted with other intestinal pathogens.

        Cite This Article
    EID Raoult D, Fenollar F, Rolain J, Minodier P, Bosdure E, Li W, et al. Tropheryma whipplei in Children with Gastroenteritis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):776-782. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091801
    AMA Raoult D, Fenollar F, Rolain J, et al. Tropheryma whipplei in Children with Gastroenteritis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):776-782. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091801.
    APA Raoult, D., Fenollar, F., Rolain, J., Minodier, P., Bosdure, E., Li, W....Richet, H. (2010). Tropheryma whipplei in Children with Gastroenteritis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 776-782. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091801.
  • Contagious Period for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 262 KB - 6 pages]
    G. De Serres et al.
        View Abstract

    We estimated the proportion of persons with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 who were shedding infectious virus at diagnosis and on day 8 of illness. In households with confirmed cases, nasopharyngeal swabs were collected on all members and tested by PCR and virus culture. Of 47 cases confirmed by PCR at <7 days of illness, virus culture was positive in 92% (11/12) of febrile and 63% (22/35) of afebrile persons. Of 43 persons with PCR-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from whom a second specimen was collected on day 8, 74% remained PCR positive and 19% were culture positive. If the 73 symptomatic household members without PCR-confirmed illness are assumed to have pandemic (H1N1) 2009, a minimum of 8% (6/73) of case-patients shed replicating virus on day 8. Self-isolation only until fever abates appears insufficient to limit transmission. Self-isolation for a week may be more effective, although some case-patients still would shed infectious virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID De Serres G, Rouleau I, Hamelin M, Quach C, Skowronski DM, Flamand L, et al. Contagious Period for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):783-788. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091894
    AMA De Serres G, Rouleau I, Hamelin M, et al. Contagious Period for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):783-788. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091894.
    APA De Serres, G., Rouleau, I., Hamelin, M., Quach, C., Skowronski, D. M., Flamand, L....Boivin, G. (2010). Contagious Period for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 783-788. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091894.
  • Historical Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan PDF Version [PDF - 374 KB - 8 pages]
    A. M. Aikembayev et al.
        View Abstract

    To map the distribution of anthrax outbreaks and strain subtypes in Kazakhstan during 1937–2005, we combined geographic information system technology and genetic analysis by using archived cultures and data. Biochemical and genetic tests confirmed the identity of 93 archived cultures in the Kazakhstan National Culture Collection as Bacillus anthracis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis genotyping identified 12 genotypes. Cluster analysis comparing these genotypes with previously published genotypes indicated that most (n = 78) isolates belonged to the previously described A1.a genetic cluster, 6 isolates belonged to the A3.b cluster, and 2 belonged to the A4 cluster. Two genotypes in the collection appeared to represent novel genetic sublineages; 1 of these isolates was from Krygystan. Our data provide a description of the historical, geographic, and genetic diversity of B. anthracis in this Central Asian region.

        Cite This Article
    EID Aikembayev AM, Lukhnova L, Temiraliyeva G, Meka-Mechenko T, Pazylov Y, Zakaryan S, et al. Historical Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):789-796. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091427
    AMA Aikembayev AM, Lukhnova L, Temiraliyeva G, et al. Historical Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):789-796. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091427.
    APA Aikembayev, A. M., Lukhnova, L., Temiraliyeva, G., Meka-Mechenko, T., Pazylov, Y., Zakaryan, S....Hadfield, T. (2010). Historical Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 789-796. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091427.
  • Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage and Risk Factors for Skin Infections, Southwestern Alaska, USA PDF Version [PDF - 226 KB - 7 pages]
    A. M. Stevens et al.
        View Abstract

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are common in southwestern Alaska. Outbreak strains have been shown to carry the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). To determine if carriage of PVL-positive CA-MRSA increased the risk for subsequent soft tissue infection, we conducted a retrospective cohort study by reviewing the medical records of 316 persons for 3.6 years after their participation in a MRSA nasal colonization survey. Demographic, nasal carriage, and antimicrobial drug use data were analyzed for association with skin infection risk. Skin infections were more likely to develop in MRSA carriers than in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus carriers or noncarriers of S. aureus during the first follow-up year, but not in subsequent years. Repeated skin infections were more common among MRSA carriers. In an area where PVL-containing MRSA is prevalent, skin infection risk was increased among MRSA nasal carriers compared with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus carriers and noncarriers, but risk differential diminished over time.

        Cite This Article
    EID Stevens AM, Hennessy TW, Baggett HC, Bruden D, Parks D, Klejka J, et al. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage and Risk Factors for Skin Infections, Southwestern Alaska, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):797-803. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090851
    AMA Stevens AM, Hennessy TW, Baggett HC, et al. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage and Risk Factors for Skin Infections, Southwestern Alaska, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):797-803. doi:10.3201/eid1605.090851.
    APA Stevens, A. M., Hennessy, T. W., Baggett, H. C., Bruden, D., Parks, D., & Klejka, J. (2010). Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage and Risk Factors for Skin Infections, Southwestern Alaska, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 797-803. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090851.
  • Capacity of Public Health Surveillance to Comply with Revised International Health Regulations, USA PDF Version [PDF - 125 KB - 5 pages]
    K. E. Armstrong et al.
        View Abstract

    Public health surveillance is essential for detecting and responding to infectious diseases and necessary for compliance with the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005. To assess reporting capacities and compliance with IHR of all 50 states and Washington, DC, we sent a questionnaire to respective epidemiologists; 47 of 51 responded. Overall reporting capacity was high. Eighty-one percent of respondents reported being able to transmit notifications about unknown or unexpected events to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) daily. Additionally, 80% of respondents reported use of a risk assessment tool to determine whether CDC should be notified of possible public health emergencies. These findings suggest that most states have systems in place to ensure compliance with IHR. However, full state-level compliance will require additional efforts.

        Cite This Article
    EID Armstrong KE, McNabb SJ, Ferland LD, Stephens T, Muldoon A, Fernandez JA, et al. Capacity of Public Health Surveillance to Comply with Revised International Health Regulations, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):804-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091127
    AMA Armstrong KE, McNabb SJ, Ferland LD, et al. Capacity of Public Health Surveillance to Comply with Revised International Health Regulations, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):804-808. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091127.
    APA Armstrong, K. E., McNabb, S. J., Ferland, L. D., Stephens, T., Muldoon, A., Fernandez, J. A....Ostroff, S. (2010). Capacity of Public Health Surveillance to Comply with Revised International Health Regulations, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 804-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091127.
  • Influenza Outbreaks during World Youth Day 2008 Mass Gathering PDF Version [PDF - 304 KB - 7 pages]
    C. C. Blyth et al.
        View Abstract

    Influenza outbreaks during mass gatherings have been rarely described, and detailed virologic assessment is lacking. An influenza outbreak occurred during World Youth Day in Sydney, Australia, July 2008 (WYD2008). We assessed epidemiologic data and respiratory samples collected from attendees who sought treatment for influenza-like illness at emergency clinics in Sydney during this outbreak. Isolated influenza viruses were compared with seasonal influenza viruses from the 2008 influenza season. From 100 infected attendees, numerous strains were identified: oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) viruses, oseltamivir-sensitive influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and strains from both influenza B lineages (B/Florida/4/2006-like and B/Malaysia/2506/2004-like). Novel viruses were introduced, and pre-WYD2008 seasonal viruses were amplified. Viruses isolated at mass gatherings can have substantial, complex, and unpredictable effects on community influenza activity. Greater flexibility by public health authorities and hospitals is required to appropriately manage and contain these outbreaks.

        Cite This Article
    EID Blyth CC, Foo H, van Hal SJ, Hurt AC, Barr IG, McPhie K, et al. Influenza Outbreaks during World Youth Day 2008 Mass Gathering. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):809-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091136
    AMA Blyth CC, Foo H, van Hal SJ, et al. Influenza Outbreaks during World Youth Day 2008 Mass Gathering. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):809-815. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091136.
    APA Blyth, C. C., Foo, H., van Hal, S. J., Hurt, A. C., Barr, I. G., McPhie, K....Dwyer, D. E. (2010). Influenza Outbreaks during World Youth Day 2008 Mass Gathering. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 809-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091136.
  • Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 2 Years after Its Introduction, the Netherlands PDF Version [PDF - 272 KB - 8 pages]
    G. D. Rodenburg et al.
        View Abstract

    In the Netherlands, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was implemented in a 3+1-dose schedule in the national immunization program for infants born after April 1, 2006. To assess the vaccine’s effectiveness, we compared disease incidence before and after vaccine implementation (June 2004–June 2006 and June 2006–June 2008, respectively). We serotyped 2,552 invasive pneumococcal isolates from throughout the Netherlands, covering 25% of the country’s population. Clinical characteristics were extracted from hospital records. After June 2006, vaccine-serotype invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) decreased 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 68%–97%) in children age eligible for PCV-7; simultaneously, however, non–vaccine-serotype IPD increased by 71% (not significant), resulting in a 44% total net IPD reduction (95% CI 7%–66%). IPD rates did not change for other age groups. In the Netherlands, PCV-7 offered high protection against vaccine-serotype IPD in vaccinated children, but increases of non–vaccine-serotype IPD reduced net vaccine benefits.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rodenburg GD, de Greeff SC, Jansen AG, de Melker HE, Schouls LM, Hak E, et al. Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 2 Years after Its Introduction, the Netherlands. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):816-823. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091223
    AMA Rodenburg GD, de Greeff SC, Jansen AG, et al. Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 2 Years after Its Introduction, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):816-823. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091223.
    APA Rodenburg, G. D., de Greeff, S. C., Jansen, A. G., de Melker, H. E., Schouls, L. M., Hak, E....van der Ende, A. (2010). Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 2 Years after Its Introduction, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 816-823. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091223.

Dispatches

  • Rapid Influenza Antigen Test for Diagnosis of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 153 KB - 3 pages]
    J. K. Louie et al.
        View Abstract

    We compared the QuickVue Influenza test with PCR for diagnosing pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in 404 persons with influenza-like illness. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 66%, 84%, 84%, and 64%, respectively. Rapid test results should be interpreted cautiously when pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus is suspected.

        Cite This Article
    EID Louie JK, Guevara H, Boston E, Dahlke M, Nevarez M, Kong T, et al. Rapid Influenza Antigen Test for Diagnosis of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):824-826. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091794
    AMA Louie JK, Guevara H, Boston E, et al. Rapid Influenza Antigen Test for Diagnosis of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):824-826. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091794.
    APA Louie, J. K., Guevara, H., Boston, E., Dahlke, M., Nevarez, M., Kong, T....Schnurr, D. P. (2010). Rapid Influenza Antigen Test for Diagnosis of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 824-826. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091794.
  • Multihospital Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infection, Cleveland, Ohio, USA PDF Version [PDF - 145 KB - 3 pages]
    R. L. Jump et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine whether a multihospital Clostridium difficile outbreak was associated with epidemic strains and whether use of particular fluoroquinolones was associated with increased infection rates, we cultured feces from C. difficile–infected patients. Use of fluoroquionolones with enhanced antianaerobic activity was not associated with increased infection rates.

        Cite This Article
    EID Jump RL, Riggs MM, Sethi AK, Pultz MJ, Ellis-Reid T, Riebel W, et al. Multihospital Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infection, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):827-829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.071606
    AMA Jump RL, Riggs MM, Sethi AK, et al. Multihospital Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infection, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):827-829. doi:10.3201/eid1605.071606.
    APA Jump, R. L., Riggs, M. M., Sethi, A. K., Pultz, M. J., Ellis-Reid, T., Riebel, W....Donskey, C. J. (2010). Multihospital Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infection, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 827-829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.071606.
  • Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA PDF Version [PDF - 195 KB - 3 pages]
    R. Trout et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine the cause of spotted fever cases in the southern United States, we screened Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected in Arkansas for rickettsiae. Of the screened ticks, 30% had PCR amplicons consistent with Rickettsia parkeri or Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii.

        Cite This Article
    EID Trout R, Steelman CD, Szalanski AL, Williamson PC. Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091314
    AMA Trout R, Steelman CD, Szalanski AL, et al. Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):830-832. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091314.
    APA Trout, R., Steelman, C. D., Szalanski, A. L., & Williamson, P. C. (2010). Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091314.
  • Bluetongue Virus in Wild Deer, Belgium, 2005–2008 PDF Version [PDF - 328 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Linden et al.
        View Abstract

    To investigate bluetongue virus serotype 8 infection in Belgium, we conducted a virologic and serologic survey on 2,416 free-ranging cervids during 2005–2008. Infection emerged in 2006 and spread over the study area in red deer, but not in roe deer.

        Cite This Article
    EID Linden A, Grégoire F, Nahayo A, Hanrez D, Mousset B, Massart AL, et al. Bluetongue Virus in Wild Deer, Belgium, 2005–2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):833-836. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091217
    AMA Linden A, Grégoire F, Nahayo A, et al. Bluetongue Virus in Wild Deer, Belgium, 2005–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):833-836. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091217.
    APA Linden, A., Grégoire, F., Nahayo, A., Hanrez, D., Mousset, B., Massart, A. L....De Clercq, K. (2010). Bluetongue Virus in Wild Deer, Belgium, 2005–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 833-836. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091217.
  • Nosocomial Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 3 pages]
    I. E. Aradaib et al.
        View Abstract

    To confirm the presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Sudan, we tested serum of 8 patients with hemorrhagic fever in a rural hospital in 2008. Reverse transcription–PCR identified Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Its identification as group III lineage indicated links to virus strains from South Africa, Mauritania, and Nigeria.

        Cite This Article
    EID Aradaib IE, Erickson BR, Mustafa ME, Khristova ML, Saeed NS, Elageb RM, et al. Nosocomial Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):837-839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091815
    AMA Aradaib IE, Erickson BR, Mustafa ME, et al. Nosocomial Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):837-839. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091815.
    APA Aradaib, I. E., Erickson, B. R., Mustafa, M. E., Khristova, M. L., Saeed, N. S., Elageb, R. M....Nichol, S. T. (2010). Nosocomial Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 837-839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091815.
  • Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Burkina Faso PDF Version [PDF - 206 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Saleri et al.
        View Abstract

    Because data from countries in Africa are limited, we measured the proportion of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) cases among TB patients in Burkina Faso for whom retreatment was failing. Of 34 patients with multidrug-resistant TB, 2 had an XDR TB strain. Second-line TB drugs should be strictly controlled to prevent further XDR TB increase.

        Cite This Article
    EID Saleri N, Badoum G, Ouedraogo M, Dembélé SM, Nacanabo R, Bonkoungou V, et al. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Burkina Faso. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):840-842. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091262
    AMA Saleri N, Badoum G, Ouedraogo M, et al. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Burkina Faso. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):840-842. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091262.
    APA Saleri, N., Badoum, G., Ouedraogo, M., Dembélé, S. M., Nacanabo, R., Bonkoungou, V....Matteelli, A. (2010). Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Burkina Faso. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 840-842. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091262.
  • Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004 PDF Version [PDF - 337 KB - 4 pages]
    S. Rantala et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 140 episodes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia occurring in Finland during 1995–2004. Rare emm types were associated with more severe disease and increased mortality rates. Skin and soft tissue infections were more frequent clinical signs among cases caused by common emm types.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rantala S, Vähäkuopus S, Vuopio-Varkila J, Vuento R, Syrjänen J. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):843-846. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.080803
    AMA Rantala S, Vähäkuopus S, Vuopio-Varkila J, et al. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):843-846. doi:10.3201/eid1605.080803.
    APA Rantala, S., Vähäkuopus, S., Vuopio-Varkila, J., Vuento, R., & Syrjänen, J. (2010). Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 843-846. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.080803.
  • Dengue Virus Surveillance for Early Warning, Singapore PDF Version [PDF - 258 KB - 3 pages]
    K. Lee et al.
        View Abstract

    In Singapore, after a major outbreak of dengue in 2005, another outbreak occurred in 2007. Laboratory-based surveillance detected a switch from dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) to DENV-2. Phylogenetic analysis showed a clade replacement within DENV-2 cosmopolitan genotype, which accompanied the predominant serotype switch, and cocirculation of multiple genotypes of DENV-3.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lee K, Lai Y, Lo S, Barkham T, Aw P, Ooi P, et al. Dengue Virus Surveillance for Early Warning, Singapore. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):847-849. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091006
    AMA Lee K, Lai Y, Lo S, et al. Dengue Virus Surveillance for Early Warning, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):847-849. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091006.
    APA Lee, K., Lai, Y., Lo, S., Barkham, T., Aw, P., Ooi, P....Ng, L. (2010). Dengue Virus Surveillance for Early Warning, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 847-849. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091006.
  • Adenovirus 36 DNA in Adipose Tissue of Patient with Unusual Visceral Obesity PDF Version [PDF - 220 KB - 3 pages]
    B. Salehian et al.
        View Abstract

    Massive adipose tissue depositions in the abdomen and thorax sufficient to interfere with respiration developed in a patient with multiple medical problems. Biopsy of adipose tissue identified human adenovirus 36 (Adv 36) DNA. Adv 36 causes adipogenesis in animals and humans. Development of massive lipomatosis may be caused by Adv 36.

        Cite This Article
    EID Salehian B, Forman SJ, Kandeel FR, Bruner DE, He J, Atkinson RL, et al. Adenovirus 36 DNA in Adipose Tissue of Patient with Unusual Visceral Obesity. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):850-852. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091271
    AMA Salehian B, Forman SJ, Kandeel FR, et al. Adenovirus 36 DNA in Adipose Tissue of Patient with Unusual Visceral Obesity. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):850-852. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091271.
    APA Salehian, B., Forman, S. J., Kandeel, F. R., Bruner, D. E., He, J., & Atkinson, R. L. (2010). Adenovirus 36 DNA in Adipose Tissue of Patient with Unusual Visceral Obesity. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 850-852. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091271.
  • Vitamin D Deficiency and Tuberculosis Progression PDF Version [PDF - 179 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Talat et al.
        View Abstract

    To assess the association between vitamin D deficiency and tuberculosis disease progression, we studied vitamin D levels in a cohort of tuberculosis patients and their contacts (N = 129) in Pakistan. Most (79%) persons showed deficiency. Low vitamin D levels were associated with a 5-fold increased risk for progression to tuberculosis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Talat N, Perry S, Parsonnet J, Dawood G, Hussain R. Vitamin D Deficiency and Tuberculosis Progression. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):853-855. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091693
    AMA Talat N, Perry S, Parsonnet J, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency and Tuberculosis Progression. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):853-855. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091693.
    APA Talat, N., Perry, S., Parsonnet, J., Dawood, G., & Hussain, R. (2010). Vitamin D Deficiency and Tuberculosis Progression. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 853-855. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091693.
  • La Crosse Virus in Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 181 KB - 3 pages]
    A. J. Lambert et al.
        View Abstract

    We report the arthropod-borne pediatric encephalitic agent La Crosse virus in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes collected in Dallas County, Texas, USA, in August 2009. The presence of this virus in an invasive vector species within a region that lies outside the virus’s historically recognized geographic range is of public health concern.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lambert AJ, Blair CD, D’Anton M, Ewing W, Harborth M, Seiferth R, et al. La Crosse Virus in Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):856-858. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.100170
    AMA Lambert AJ, Blair CD, D’Anton M, et al. La Crosse Virus in Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):856-858. doi:10.3201/eid1605.100170.
    APA Lambert, A. J., Blair, C. D., D’Anton, M., Ewing, W., Harborth, M., Seiferth, R....Lanciotti, R. S. (2010). La Crosse Virus in Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 856-858. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.100170.
  • Unusual Assortment of Segments in 2 Rare Human Rotavirus Genomes PDF Version [PDF - 257 KB - 4 pages]
    S. De Grazia et al.
        View Abstract

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

        Cite This Article
    EID De Grazia S, Giammanco GM, Potgieter CA, Matthijnssens J, Bányai K, Platia MA, et al. Unusual Assortment of Segments in 2 Rare Human Rotavirus Genomes. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):859-862. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091826
    AMA De Grazia S, Giammanco GM, Potgieter CA, et al. Unusual Assortment of Segments in 2 Rare Human Rotavirus Genomes. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):859-862. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091826.
    APA De Grazia, S., Giammanco, G. M., Potgieter, C. A., Matthijnssens, J., Bányai, K., Platia, M. A....Martella, V. (2010). Unusual Assortment of Segments in 2 Rare Human Rotavirus Genomes. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 859-862. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091826.
  • Transmission of Hemagglutinin D222G Mutant Strain of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus PDF Version [PDF - 173 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Puzelli et al.
        View Abstract

    A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain carrying the D222G mutation was identified in a severely ill man and was transmitted to a household contact. Only mild illness developed in the contact, despite his obesity and diabetes. The isolated virus reacted fully with an antiserum against the pandemic vaccine strain.

        Cite This Article
    EID Puzelli S, Facchini M, Spagnolo D, De Marco MA, Calzoletti L, Zanetti A, et al. Transmission of Hemagglutinin D222G Mutant Strain of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):863-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091858
    AMA Puzelli S, Facchini M, Spagnolo D, et al. Transmission of Hemagglutinin D222G Mutant Strain of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):863-865. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091858.
    APA Puzelli, S., Facchini, M., Spagnolo, D., De Marco, M. A., Calzoletti, L., Zanetti, A....Donatelli, I. (2010). Transmission of Hemagglutinin D222G Mutant Strain of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 863-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091858.
  • Schistosomiasis among Recreational Users of Upper Nile River, Uganda, 2007 PDF Version [PDF - 146 KB - 3 pages]
    O. W. Morgan et al.
        View Abstract

    After recreational exposure to river water in Uganda, 12 (17%) of 69 persons had evidence of schistosome infection. Eighteen percent self-medicated with praziquantel prophylaxis immediately after exposure, which was not appropriate. Travelers to schistosomiasis-endemic areas should consult a travel medicine physician.

        Cite This Article
    EID Morgan OW, Brunette GW, Kapella BK, McAuliffe I, Katongole-Mbidde E, Li W, et al. Schistosomiasis among Recreational Users of Upper Nile River, Uganda, 2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):866-868. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091740
    AMA Morgan OW, Brunette GW, Kapella BK, et al. Schistosomiasis among Recreational Users of Upper Nile River, Uganda, 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):866-868. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091740.
    APA Morgan, O. W., Brunette, G. W., Kapella, B. K., McAuliffe, I., Katongole-Mbidde, E., Li, W....Montgomery, S. P. (2010). Schistosomiasis among Recreational Users of Upper Nile River, Uganda, 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 866-868. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091740.

Another Dimension

  • Sticky Decisions: Peanut Butter in a Time of Salmonella PDF Version [PDF - 245 KB - 5 pages]
    G. Kaptan and B. Fischhoff
        View Abstract

    We present a consumer-focused perspective on creating communications regarding potentially contaminated foods. It is illustrated with decisions that might have faced US consumers during the 2009 recalls of peanut and pistachio products. The example shows how knowledge about test results and regulatory processes might be made more useful to consumers.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kaptan G, Fischhoff B. Sticky Decisions: Peanut Butter in a Time of Salmonella. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):900-904. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.AD1605
    AMA Kaptan G, Fischhoff B. Sticky Decisions: Peanut Butter in a Time of Salmonella. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):900-904. doi:10.3201/eid1605.AD1605.
    APA Kaptan, G., & Fischhoff, B. (2010). Sticky Decisions: Peanut Butter in a Time of Salmonella. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 900-904. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.AD1605.

Letters

  • Kobuvirus in Domestic Sheep, Hungary PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 2 pages]
    G. Reuter et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Reuter G, Boros Á, Pankovics P, Egyed L. Kobuvirus in Domestic Sheep, Hungary. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):869-870. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091934
    AMA Reuter G, Boros Á, Pankovics P, et al. Kobuvirus in Domestic Sheep, Hungary. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):869-870. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091934.
    APA Reuter, G., Boros, Á., Pankovics, P., & Egyed, L. (2010). Kobuvirus in Domestic Sheep, Hungary. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 869-870. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091934.
  • Physician Awareness of Chagas Disease, USA PDF Version [PDF - 151 KB - 2 pages]
    K. K. Stimpert and S. P. Montgomery
            Cite This Article
    EID Stimpert KK, Montgomery SP. Physician Awareness of Chagas Disease, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):871-872. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091440
    AMA Stimpert KK, Montgomery SP. Physician Awareness of Chagas Disease, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):871-872. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091440.
    APA Stimpert, K. K., & Montgomery, S. P. (2010). Physician Awareness of Chagas Disease, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 871-872. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091440.
  • Possible Transmission of Pandemic (HIN1) 2009 Virus with Oseltamivir Resistance PDF Version [PDF - 146 KB - 2 pages]
    M. Mandelboim et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mandelboim M, Hindiyeh M, Meningher T, Mendelson E. Possible Transmission of Pandemic (HIN1) 2009 Virus with Oseltamivir Resistance. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):873-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091835
    AMA Mandelboim M, Hindiyeh M, Meningher T, et al. Possible Transmission of Pandemic (HIN1) 2009 Virus with Oseltamivir Resistance. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):873-874. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091835.
    APA Mandelboim, M., Hindiyeh, M., Meningher, T., & Mendelson, E. (2010). Possible Transmission of Pandemic (HIN1) 2009 Virus with Oseltamivir Resistance. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 873-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091835.
  • Cross-Reactive Antibodies to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Singapore PDF Version [PDF - 148 KB - 3 pages]
    J. W. Tang et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Tang JW, Tambyah PA, Wilder-Smith A, Puong K, Shaw R, Barr IG, et al. Cross-Reactive Antibodies to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Singapore. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):874-876. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091678
    AMA Tang JW, Tambyah PA, Wilder-Smith A, et al. Cross-Reactive Antibodies to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):874-876. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091678.
    APA Tang, J. W., Tambyah, P. A., Wilder-Smith, A., Puong, K., Shaw, R., Barr, I. G....Chan, K. (2010). Cross-Reactive Antibodies to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 874-876. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091678.
  • Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Taiwan PDF Version [PDF - 245 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Huang et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Huang J, Lin T, Teng H, Su C, Tsai K, Lu L, et al. Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Taiwan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):876-878. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091055
    AMA Huang J, Lin T, Teng H, et al. Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):876-878. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091055.
    APA Huang, J., Lin, T., Teng, H., Su, C., Tsai, K., Lu, L....Shu, P. (2010). Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 876-878. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091055.
  • Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Typhoid, South Africa
    K. H. Keddy et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Keddy KH, Smith AM, Sooka A, Ismail H, Oliver S. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Typhoid, South Africa. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):879-880. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091917
    AMA Keddy KH, Smith AM, Sooka A, et al. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Typhoid, South Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):879-880. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091917.
    APA Keddy, K. H., Smith, A. M., Sooka, A., Ismail, H., & Oliver, S. (2010). Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Typhoid, South Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 879-880. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091917.
  • Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland PDF Version [PDF - 148 KB - 2 pages]
    K. Pollock et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Pollock K, Locking ME, Beattie TJ, Maxwell H, Ramage I, Hughes D, et al. Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):881-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091919
    AMA Pollock K, Locking ME, Beattie TJ, et al. Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):881-882. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091919.
    APA Pollock, K., Locking, M. E., Beattie, T. J., Maxwell, H., Ramage, I., Hughes, D....Cowden, J. M. (2010). Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 881-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091919.
  • Co-infection with Dengue Virus and Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus PDF Version [PDF - 154 KB - 3 pages]
    E. L. Rodriguez et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Rodriguez EL, Tomashek KM, Gregory CJ, Munoz J, Hunsperger E, Lorenzi OD, et al. Co-infection with Dengue Virus and Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):882-884. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091920
    AMA Rodriguez EL, Tomashek KM, Gregory CJ, et al. Co-infection with Dengue Virus and Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):882-884. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091920.
    APA Rodriguez, E. L., Tomashek, K. M., Gregory, C. J., Munoz, J., Hunsperger, E., Lorenzi, O. D....Garcia-Gubern, C. (2010). Co-infection with Dengue Virus and Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 882-884. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091920.
  • Bovine Tuberculosis in Buffaloes, Southern Africa PDF Version [PDF - 147 KB - 2 pages]
    M. de Garine-Wichatitsky et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID de Garine-Wichatitsky M, Caron A, Gomo C, Foggin C, Dutlow K, Pfukenyi D, et al. Bovine Tuberculosis in Buffaloes, Southern Africa. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):884-885. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090710
    AMA de Garine-Wichatitsky M, Caron A, Gomo C, et al. Bovine Tuberculosis in Buffaloes, Southern Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):884-885. doi:10.3201/eid1605.090710.
    APA de Garine-Wichatitsky, M., Caron, A., Gomo, C., Foggin, C., Dutlow, K., Pfukenyi, D....Michel, A. L. (2010). Bovine Tuberculosis in Buffaloes, Southern Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 884-885. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090710.
  • No Resistance Plasmid in Yersinia pestis, North America PDF Version [PDF - 165 KB - 3 pages]
    D. M. Wagner et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Wagner DM, Runberg J, Vogler AJ, Lee J, Driebe EM, Price LB, et al. No Resistance Plasmid in Yersinia pestis, North America. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):885-887. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090892
    AMA Wagner DM, Runberg J, Vogler AJ, et al. No Resistance Plasmid in Yersinia pestis, North America. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):885-887. doi:10.3201/eid1605.090892.
    APA Wagner, D. M., Runberg, J., Vogler, A. J., Lee, J., Driebe, E. M., Price, L. B....Keim, P. (2010). No Resistance Plasmid in Yersinia pestis, North America. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 885-887. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090892.
  • Triatoma infestans Bugs in Southern Patagonia, Argentina PDF Version [PDF - 199 KB - 3 pages]
    R. V. Piccinali et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Piccinali RV, Canale DM, Sandoval AE, Cardinal MV, Jensen O, Kitron U, et al. Triatoma infestans Bugs in Southern Patagonia, Argentina. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):887-889. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091260
    AMA Piccinali RV, Canale DM, Sandoval AE, et al. Triatoma infestans Bugs in Southern Patagonia, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):887-889. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091260.
    APA Piccinali, R. V., Canale, D. M., Sandoval, A. E., Cardinal, M. V., Jensen, O., Kitron, U....Gürtler, R. E. (2010). Triatoma infestans Bugs in Southern Patagonia, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 887-889. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091260.
  • Serologic Survey of Hantavirus Infection, Brazilian Amazon PDF Version [PDF - 152 KB - 3 pages]
    W. S. Mendes et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mendes WS, da Silva AA, Neiva RF, Costa NM, de Assis MS, Vidigal PM, et al. Serologic Survey of Hantavirus Infection, Brazilian Amazon. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):889-891. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090766
    AMA Mendes WS, da Silva AA, Neiva RF, et al. Serologic Survey of Hantavirus Infection, Brazilian Amazon. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):889-891. doi:10.3201/eid1605.090766.
    APA Mendes, W. S., da Silva, A. A., Neiva, R. F., Costa, N. M., de Assis, M. S., Vidigal, P. M....Vasconcelos, P. F. (2010). Serologic Survey of Hantavirus Infection, Brazilian Amazon. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 889-891. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.090766.
  • Body Lice, Yersinia pestis Orientalis, and Black Death PDF Version [PDF - 160 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Ayyadurai et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ayyadurai S, Sebbane F, Raoult D, Drancourt M. Body Lice, Yersinia pestis Orientalis, and Black Death. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):892-893. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091280
    AMA Ayyadurai S, Sebbane F, Raoult D, et al. Body Lice, Yersinia pestis Orientalis, and Black Death. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):892-893. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091280.
    APA Ayyadurai, S., Sebbane, F., Raoult, D., & Drancourt, M. (2010). Body Lice, Yersinia pestis Orientalis, and Black Death. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 892-893. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091280.
  • Salmonella Senftenberg Infections and Fennel Seed Tea, Serbia PDF Version [PDF - 232 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Ilić et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ilić S, Đurić P, Grego E. Salmonella Senftenberg Infections and Fennel Seed Tea, Serbia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):893-895. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091555
    AMA Ilić S, Đurić P, Grego E. Salmonella Senftenberg Infections and Fennel Seed Tea, Serbia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):893-895. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091555.
    APA Ilić, S., Đurić, P., & Grego, E. (2010). Salmonella Senftenberg Infections and Fennel Seed Tea, Serbia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 893-895. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091555.
  • Cryptosporidiosis Associated with Wildlife Center, Scotland PDF Version [PDF - 181 KB - 2 pages]
    C. C. McGuigan et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID McGuigan CC, Steven K, Pollock K. Cryptosporidiosis Associated with Wildlife Center, Scotland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):895-896. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091468
    AMA McGuigan CC, Steven K, Pollock K. Cryptosporidiosis Associated with Wildlife Center, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):895-896. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091468.
    APA McGuigan, C. C., Steven, K., & Pollock, K. (2010). Cryptosporidiosis Associated with Wildlife Center, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 895-896. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091468.
  • Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, USA PDF Version [PDF - 150 KB - 2 pages]
    L. A. Hicks et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Hicks LA, Monnet DL, Roberts RM. Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):896-897. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091424
    AMA Hicks LA, Monnet DL, Roberts RM. Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):896-897. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091424.
    APA Hicks, L. A., Monnet, D. L., & Roberts, R. M. (2010). Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 896-897. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091424.
  • Rapid Antigen Test for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus PDF Version [PDF - 147 KB - 2 pages]
    B. M. Diederen et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Diederen BM, Veenendaal D, Jansen R, Herpers BL, Ligtvoet EE, IJzerman EP, et al. Rapid Antigen Test for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):897-898. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091574
    AMA Diederen BM, Veenendaal D, Jansen R, et al. Rapid Antigen Test for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):897-898. doi:10.3201/eid1605.091574.
    APA Diederen, B. M., Veenendaal, D., Jansen, R., Herpers, B. L., Ligtvoet, E. E., & IJzerman, E. P. (2010). Rapid Antigen Test for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 897-898. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.091574.

Books and Media

  • The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses PDF Version [PDF - 207 KB - 1 page]
    B. W. Mahy
            Cite This Article
    EID Mahy BW. The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):899. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.100164
    AMA Mahy BW. The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):899. doi:10.3201/eid1605.100164.
    APA Mahy, B. W. (2010). The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 899. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.100164.

About the Cover

  • The Whole Heaven a Musical Scale and a Number PDF Version [PDF - 193 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. The Whole Heaven a Musical Scale and a Number. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):905-906. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.AC1605
    AMA Potter P. The Whole Heaven a Musical Scale and a Number. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):905-906. doi:10.3201/eid1605.AC1605.
    APA Potter, P. (2010). The Whole Heaven a Musical Scale and a Number. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 905-906. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.AC1605.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Tropheryma whipplei PDF Version [PDF - 115 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Etymologia: Tropheryma whipplei. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(5):839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.E11605
    AMA Etymologia: Tropheryma whipplei. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):839. doi:10.3201/eid1605.E11605.
    APA (2010). Etymologia: Tropheryma whipplei. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 839. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1605.E11605.

Conference Summaries

TOP