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Measles in Vietnam

Warning - Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel
Alert - Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions
Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions

Released: June 02, 2014

Learn more about Measles

What is the current situation?

According to Vietnam’s Ministry of Health, about 8,700 suspected measles cases and 112 deaths from measles were reported in Vietnam as of April 18, 2014. Most of the deaths reported were in children with underlying medical conditions. About 60% of the reported measles cases are from the Northern region and about 30% are from the Southern region of Vietnam.

CDC recommends that travelers to Vietnam protect themselves by making sure they are vaccinated against measles, particularly infants 6–11 months of age (1 dose of measles vaccine) and children 12 months of age or older (2 doses of measles vaccine). Clinicians should keep measles in mind when treating patients with fever and rash, especially if the patient has recently traveled internationally.

What can travelers do to protect themselves?

Get measles vaccine*:

  • People who cannot show that they were vaccinated as children and who have never had measles should be vaccinated.
  • Infants 6–11 months of age should have 1 dose of measles vaccine if traveling internationally.
    • Children in the United States routinely receive measles vaccination at 12–15 months of age.
    • Infants vaccinated before age 12 months should be revaccinated on or after the first birthday with 2 doses, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Children 12 months of age or older should have 2 doses, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Adolescents and adults who have not had measles or have not been vaccinated should get 2 doses, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Two doses of MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine is nearly 100% effective at preventing measles.
  • The only measles vaccines available in the United States are the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and the measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccines. MMR has been used safely and effectively since the 1970s. A few people experience mild, temporary adverse reactions, such as joint pain, from the vaccine, but serious side effects are extremely rare. There is no link between MMR and autism.

*Updated vaccine recommendations are available in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Practice hygiene and cleanliness:

  • Wash your hands often.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean your hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, or sharing eating utensils or cups, with people who are sick.

If you feel sick and think you may have measles:

Traveler Information

Clinician Information

 

 
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