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Appendices  

Appendix B: Travel Vaccine Summary Table

David R. Shlim

Table B-01 is a quick reference for administering or prescribing travel-related vaccines. Before administering any vaccine, please pay particular attention to the dose and whether it is to be administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Also review detailed instructions, contraindications, precautions, and side effects under the specific vaccines discussed in this book or in the manufacturer’s prescribing information. For other immunizations, refer to the corresponding disease section in Chapter 3.

 

Table B-01. Travel vaccine summary

VACCINE BRAND NAME DOSE ROUTE SCHED-
ULE
BOOSTER AGE
Hepatitis A (adult) Havrix 1.0 mL (1,440 ELISA units) IM 0 and 6–12 months None ≥19 years
Vaqta 1.0 mL (50 units) IM 0 and 6–18 months None ≥19 years
Hepatitis A (pediatric) Havrix 0.5 mL (720 ELISA units) IM 0 and 6–12 months None 1–18 years
Vaqta 0.5 mL (25 units) IM 0 and 6–18 months None 1–18 years
Combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B Twinrix 1.0 mL (20μg of hepatitis B antigen and 720 ELISA units of hepatitis A antigen) IM 0, 1 month, and 6 months; acceler-
ated schedule: days 0, 7, and 21–30, with a fourth dose at 12 months
None ≥18 years
Hepatitis B (adult) Engerix-B 1.0 mL (20μg) IM 0, 1 month, and 6 months; can be given on an accelerated schedule of 0, 1 month, 2 months, and 12 months None ≥20 years
Recombivax HB 1.0 mL (20μg) IM >0, 1 month, and 6 months None ≥20 years
Hepatitis B (pediatric) Engerix-B 0.5 mL (10μg) IM 0, 1 month, and 6 months; can be given on an accelerated schedule of 0, 1 month, 2 months, and 12 months. If using an accelerated schedule, give 0.5 mL (10 μg) for ages birth through 10 years and 1.0 mL (20 μg) for ages 11–19 years None ≤19 years
Recombivax HB (primary) 0.5 mL (5μg) IM 0, 1 month, and 6 months None ≤19 years
Recombivax HB (adolescent accelerated) 1.0 mL (10μg) IM 0, 4–6 months None For ages 11–15 years
Japanese encepha-
litis
Ixiaro 0.5 mL IM 0 and 28 days ≥1 year after primary series1 ≥17 years1
Meningo-
coccal conjugate (MenACWY)
Menactra
(MenACWYD)
0.5 mL IM 2-dose primary series separated by 3 months See Chapter 3, Meningo-
coccal Disease
9-23 months
   0.5 mL IM 1 dose See Chapter 3, Meningo-
coccal Disease
 2–55 years
Menveo
(MenACWYCRM)
0.5 mL IM 1 dose See Chapter 3, Meningo-
coccal Disease
2–55 years
Meningo-
coccal polysac-
charide (MPSV4)
Meno-
mune
0.5 mL SC 1 dose See Chapter 3, Meningo-
coccal Disease
≥2 years
Inacti-
vated polio (adult)
Ipol 0.5 mL SC or IM 1 dose at ≥18 years, if patient has already had an accept-
able polio vaccine series
None ≥18 years2
Rabies Imovax 1.0 mL IM Preexposure series: days 0, 7, and 21 or 28 See Chapter 3, Rabies No age restric-
tions
RabAvert 1.0 mL IM Preexposure series: days 0, 7, and 21 or 28 See Chapter 3, Rabies No age restric-
tions
Typhoid capsular polysac-
charide
Typhim Vi 0.5 mL IM 1 dose Every 2 years ≥2 years
Typhoid oral, live, attenu-
ated
Vivotif 1 pill Oral 1 pill every other day for 4 doses Every 5 years ≥6 years
Yellow fever YF-Vax 0.5 mL SC 1 dose Every 10 years ≥9 months, same dose for children and adults3

Abbreviations: ELU, ELISA units of inactivated HAV; HAV, hepatitis A virus; HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antigen; IM, intramuscular; U, units HAV antigen; SC, subcutaneous.
1 Consult the prescribing information for differences in dosing for hemodialysis and other immunocompromised patients.
2 If potential for Japanese encephalitis virus exposure continues. Data on the response to a booster dose administered ≥2 years after the primary series are not available. Data on the need for and timing of additional booster doses are also not available.
3 If an infant is receiving the vaccine before travel, 2 doses may be administered as early as 8 weeks apart.
4 Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D or MenACWY-CRM) is recommended after 3 years for children who were previously vaccinated at ages 9 months through 6 years. Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine is recommended after 5 years for people who were previously vaccinated at ages 7–55 years and every 5 years thereafter for people who are at continued risk.
5 Infants and children who received HibMenCY-TT and are traveling to areas with high endemic rates of meningococcal disease such as the African meningitis belt are not protected against serogroups A and W and should receive a quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine before travel.
6 Revaccination with meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is recommended for adults aged >55 years who remain at increased risk 5 years after the last dose.
7 Must be kept refrigerated at 35.6°F–46.4°F (2°C–8°C); administer with cool liquid no warmer than 98.6°F (37°C).
8 Special considerations apply in deciding whether to administer yellow fever vaccine to people aged <9 months or ≥60 years. Please review Chapter 3, Yellow Fever before administration.
9 In 2014, the World Health Assembly (of the World Health Organization) adopted the recommendation to remove the 10 year booster dose requirement from the International Health Regulations as of June 2016. Once this change is instituted, a completed International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis will be valid for the lifetime of the vaccinee. It is uncertain when and if all countries with yellow fever vaccination entry requirements will adopt this change. In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is considering the issue of the continued need for yellow fever vaccine boosters. Until the ACIP issues updated recommendations, CDC recommends that US travelers receive booster doses of yellow fever vaccine every 10 years if traveling to an area with risk of exposure to yellow fever virus. For the most up-to-date information about the need for yellow fever vaccine boosters, consult the CDC Travelers’ Health website at www.cdc.gov/travel.

 

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