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Volume 11, Number 1—January 2005

Research

Border Screening for SARS

Ronald K. St. John*, Arlene King*, Dick de Jong*, Margaret Bodie-Collins*, Susan G. Squires*, and Theresa WS Tam*
Author affiliations: *Public Health Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Main Article

Table 3

Travel histories of persons departing from Canada in whom a SARS-like illness was subsequently diagnosed*

Case no. Age Sex Depart date, Toronto Onset of illness Probable 
SARS† Link‡ Remarks
1 3 F March 28 March 31 Yes No PCR negative for SARS-CoV
2 5 M March 28 March 25 Yes No No evidence of pneumonia, 
PCR negative for SARS-CoV
3 1 M March 28 April 1 Yes No No evidence of pneumonia, 
PCR negative for SARS-CoV
4 26 F March 31 April 3 Yes No PCR and serologic test results 
negative for SAR-CoV
5 52 M April 1 April 3 Yes Yes Traveled by car, PCR and serologic test results positive for SARS-CoV
6 46 F April 3 April 6 Yes Yes Fatal SARS case
7 24 M April 28 April 30 Yes No Serologic and PCR test results 
negative for SARS-CoV
8 28 F April 24 May 3 Yes No No laboratory results available
9 29 M May 10 May 13 Yes No Traveled by car, PCR negative and acute serologic test results negative for SARS-CoV (convalescent-phase serologic test results not available)
10 47 M May 17 May 24 Yes Yes Acute–phase serologic test results 
positive for SARS-CoV
11 25 M July 14 July 7 Yes No Laboratory results unavailable

*SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome; F, female; M. male; SARS-CoV, SARS-associated coronavirus; PCR, polymerase chain reaction.
†Met the World Health Organization probable SARS case definition at time of illness.
‡Is an epidemiologic link to another SARS case established?

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