Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 12, Number 4—April 2006

Synopsis

Domestic Ducks and H5N1 Influenza Epidemic, Thailand

Thaweesak Songserm*, Rungroj Jam-on*, Numdee Sae-Heng*, Noppadol Meemak†, Diane J. Hulse-Post‡, Katharine M. Sturm-Ramirez‡, and Robert G. Webster‡Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Kasetsart University, Nakornpathom, Thailand; †Western Veterinary Research and Development Center, Rachaburi, Thailand; ‡St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Example of grazing-duck movement. A single flock of ducks was moved 3 times by truck in 1 season in 2004. The size of the flock is 3,000–10,000. The time spent at each site depends on the availability of rice fields at the site: an acre of rice could support 3,000 ducks for 1 to 2 days. The duck owners have agreements with the landowners regarding the time of harvest and the acreage available. One flock could spend as long as 1 month at a single site before being moved to the next.

Figure 2. Example of grazing-duck movement. A single flock of ducks was moved 3 times by truck in 1 season in 2004. The size of the flock is 3,000–10,000. The time spent at each site depends on the availability of rice fields at the site: an acre of rice could support 3,000 ducks for 1 to 2 days. The duck owners have agreements with the landowners regarding the time of harvest and the acreage available. One flock could spend as long as 1 month at a single site before being moved to the next.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO