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Volume 13, Number 12—December 2007

Research

Studies of Reservoir Hosts for Marburg Virus

Robert Swanepoel*Comments to Author , Sheilagh B. Smit*, Pierre E. Rollin†, Pierre Formenty‡, Patricia A. Leman*, Alan Kemp*, Felicity J. Burt§, Antoinette A. Grobbelaar*, Janice Croft*, Daniel G. Bausch¶, Hervé Zeller#, Herwig Leirs††, L.E.O. Braack‡‡, Modeste L. Libande§§, Sherif Zaki†, Stuart T. Nichol†, Thomas G. Ksiazek†, Janusz T. Paweska*, and on behalf of the International ScientificTechnical Committee for Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever Control in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Author affiliations: *National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Sandringham, Republic of South Africa; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ‡World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; §University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; ¶Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; #Institut Pasteur, Lyon, France; **University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; ††University of Aarhus, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark; ‡‡Conservation International, Cape Town, South Africa; §§Department of Health, Watsa, Democratic Republic of the Congo;

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic analysis created by using a neighbor-joining algorithm (MEGA version 3.1, [3]) that related sequences of 302-nt fragments of Marburg viral protein 35 gene detected in 12 bats in Durba Mine (boldface) to sequences determined for isolates from human patients in the Durba plus previous outbreaks of the disease. Six bat-derived sequences were identical to sequences from human isolates during the outbreak; 1 corresponded to a 1975 human isolate from Zimbabwe, and the remaining 5 represented novel sequences, making a total of 15 distinct MARV sequences found to be in circulation during the Durba epidemic. Bootstrap values were determined by 500 replicates. DRC, Democratic Republic of the Congo; GER, Germany; KEN, Kenya; ZIM, Zimbabwe.

Figure 2. Phylogenetic analysis created by using a neighbor-joining algorithm (MEGA version 3.1, [3]) that related sequences of 302-nt fragments of Marburg viral protein 35 gene detected in 12 bats in Durba Mine (boldface) to sequences determined for isolates from human patients in the Durba plus previous outbreaks of the disease. Six bat-derived sequences were identical to sequences from human isolates during the outbreak; 1 corresponded to a 1975 human isolate from Zimbabwe, and the remaining 5 represented novel sequences, making a total of 15 distinct MARV sequences found to be in circulation during the Durba epidemic. Bootstrap values were determined by 500 replicates. DRC, Democratic Republic of the Congo; GER, Germany; KEN, Kenya; ZIM, Zimbabwe.

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