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Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007

Research

Antimicrobial Drug–Resistant Escherichia coli from Humans and Poultry Products, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 2002–2004

James R. Johnson*†Comments to Author , Mark R. Sannes*†1, Cynthia Croy*†, Brian Johnston*†, Connie Clabots*†, Michael A. Kuskowski*†, Jeff Bender‡, Kirk E. Smith§, Patricia L. Winokur¶#, and Edward A. Belongia**
Author affiliations: *Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; †University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; ‡University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA; §Minnesota Department of Health, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA; ¶University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; #Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; **Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA;

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Figure 2

Distribution of virulence factor scores by source and resistance status among 243 extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from human feces and poultry products, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 2002–2004. Resistant, resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid (quinolones), and ceftriaxone or ceftazidime (extended-spectrum cephalosporins). Susceptible, susceptible to all these agents (regardless of other possible resistances). The virulence scores of the susceptible human isolates are an average of ≈4 points greater than those of the resistant human isolates or poultry isolates.

Figure 2. Distribution of virulence factor scores by source and resistance status among 243 extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from human feces and poultry products, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 2002–2004. Resistant, resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid (quinolones), and ceftriaxone or ceftazidime (extended-spectrum cephalosporins). Susceptible, susceptible to all these agents (regardless of other possible resistances). The virulence scores of the susceptible human isolates are an average of ≈4 points greater than those of the resistant human isolates or poultry isolates.

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1Current affiliation: Park Nicollet Clinic, Saint Louis Park, Minnesota, USA

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