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Volume 14, Number 8—August 2008

Dispatch

Cutaneous Infrared Thermometry for Detecting Febrile Patients

Pierre Hausfater*†Comments to Author , Yan Zhao†‡, Stéphanie Defrenne*†, Pascale Bonnet*†, and Bruno Riou*†
Author affiliations: *UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France; †Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris; ‡Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China;

Main Article

Figure 2

Figure 2 - A) Comparison of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showing relationship between sensitivity (true positive) and 1 – specificity (true negative) in determining value of cutaneous temperature for predicting various thresholds of hyperthermia definitions (37.5°C, 38.0°C, and 38.5°C) of tympanic temperature. Areas under ROC curves (95% confidence interval) were 0.935 (0.876–0.966), 0.873 (0.807–0.917), and 0.792 (0.749–0.829), respectively, and all were significantl

Figure 2. A) Comparison of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showing relationship between sensitivity (true positive) and 1 – specificity (true negative) in determining value of cutaneous temperature for predicting various thresholds of hyperthermia definitions (37.5°C, 38.0°C, and 38.5°C) of tympanic temperature. Areas under ROC curves (95% confidence interval) were 0.935 (0.876–0.966), 0.873 (0.807–0.917), and 0.792 (0.749–0.829), respectively, and all were significantly (p<0.001) different from the identity line (dashed diagonal line). B) Correlation and C) Bland and Altman diagrams comparing cutaneous and tympanic temperature measurements (n = 2,026 patients). Values on the y-axis in panel C represent differences between cutaneous and tympanic temperatures. The solid horizontal line in panel C represents the null difference between cutaneous and tympanic temperatures, and the 2 dashed horizontal lines represent ± 2 standard deviations.

Main Article

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