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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

Research

Bacterial Phenotype Variants in Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome1

Parham Sendi2Comments to Author , Linda Johansson, Samira Dahesh, Nina M. Van Sorge, Jessica Darenberg, Mari Norgren, Jan Sjölin, Victor Nizet, and Anna Norrby-Teglund
Author affiliations: Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (P. Sendi, L. Johansson, A. Norrby-Teglund); Basel University Medical Clinic, Liestal, Switzerland (P. Sendi); University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA (S. Dahesh, N.M. Van Sorge, V. Nizet); Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm (J. Darenberg); Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (M. Norgren); Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (J. Sjölin)

Main Article

Figure 6

Murine toxic shock model (high inoculum). Groups of 5 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5–7 × 107 CFU of low hemolytic (LH)/high encapsulation (HC) or high hemolytic (HH)/low encapsulation (LC) group B streptococcal isolates per mouse. A) Level of bacteremia assessed after 6 h. Horizontal lines indicate the median. B) Kaplan-Meier survival plot.

Figure 6. Murine toxic shock model (high inoculum). Groups of 5 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5–7 × 107 CFU of low hemolytic (LH)/high encapsulation (HC) or high hemolytic (HH)/low encapsulation (LC) group B streptococcal isolates per mouse. A) Level of bacteremia assessed after 6 h. Horizontal lines indicate the median. B) Kaplan-Meier survival plot.

Main Article

1Part of this work was presented at Lancefield 2008 International Symposium on Streptococci and Streptococcal Diseases, Porto Heli, Greece, June 22–26, 2008.

2Current affiliation: Clinic for Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

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