Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 16, Number 3—March 2010

Research

Vaccine Preventability of Meningococcal Clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany

Johannes EliasComments to Author , Leo M. Schouls, Ingrid van de Pol, Wendy C. Keijzers, Diana R. Martin, Anne Glennie, Philipp Oster, Matthias Frosch, Ulrich Vogel1, and Arie van der Ende1
Author affiliations: University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany (J. Elias, M. Frosch, U. Vogel); National Institute for Public Health and Environment (RIVN), Bilthoven, the Netherlands (L.M. Schouls, I. van de Pol); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (W.C. Keijzers, A. van der Ende); Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Porirua, New Zealand (D.R. Martin, A. Glennie); Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy (P. Oster)

Main Article

Figure 3

Yearwise spatial distribution of MT19/ST42 strains within the study region in Germany during 2001–2006. Color-coded values represent estimates of the intensity function underlying the point pattern data. Gray circle marks the city of Aachen; the white line represents the border between the Netherlands and Germany.

Figure 3. Yearwise spatial distribution of MT19/ST42 strains within the study region in Germany during 2001–2006. Color-coded values represent estimates of the intensity function underlying the point pattern data. Gray circle marks the city of Aachen; the white line represents the border between the Netherlands and Germany.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO