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Volume 16, Number 4—April 2010

CME ACTIVITY

Community-associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit1

Aaron M. MilstoneComments to Author , Karen C. Carroll, Tracy Ross, K. Alexander Shangraw, and Trish M. Perl
Author affiliations: The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Main Article

Figure

Dendrogram of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains that colonized children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA, 2007–2008. Isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Not all strains within a PFGE type had identical patterns, but strains were considered related with <3 band differences; 66 isolates were analyzed. The number of isolates related to each PFGE type is listed. *Reference strains.

Figure. Dendrogram of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains that colonized children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA, 2007–2008. Isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Not all strains within a PFGE type had identical patterns, but strains were considered related with <3 band differences; 66 isolates were analyzed. The number of isolates related to each PFGE type is listed. *Reference strains.

Main Article

1These data were presented in part at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America, Orlando, Florida, USA, April 2008.

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