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Volume 16, Number 4—April 2010

Research

Escherichia albertii in Wild and Domestic Birds

J. Lindsay OaksComments to Author , Thomas E. Besser, Seth T. Walk, David M. Gordon, Kimberlee B. Beckmen, Kathy A. Burek, Gary J. Haldorson, Dan S. Bradway, Lindsey Ouellette, Fred R. Rurangirwa, Margaret A. Davis, Greg Dobbin, and Thomas S. Whittam1
Author affiliations: Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA (J.L. Oaks, T.E. Besser, G.J. Haldorson, D.S. Bradway, F.R. Rurangirwa, M.A. Davis); University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA (S.T. Walk); The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia (D.M. Gordon); Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA (K.B. Beckmen); Alaska Veterinary Pathology Services, Eagle River, Alaska, USA (K.A. Burek); Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA (L. Ouellette, T.S. Whittam); University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada (G. Dobbin); 1Deceased.

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Figure 1

Neighbor-joining dendrogram of bird and human isolates, based on nucleotide variation at 6 conserved housekeeping loci in the Escherichia albertii genome (multilocus sequence typing), supporting identification of all isolates as E. albertii. Three distinct clades are designated EA 1–EA 3. No clustering of isolates is apparent on the basis of their host type, geographic origin, or association with disease. Inset is a SplitsTree phylogenetic network of the genus Escherichia, showing the E. alberti

Figure 1. Neighbor-joining dendrogram of bird and human isolates, based on nucleotide variation at 6 conserved housekeeping loci in the Escherichia albertii genome (multilocus sequence typing), supporting identification of all isolates as E. albertii. Three distinct clades are designated EA 1–EA 3. No clustering of isolates is apparent on the basis of their host type, geographic origin, or association with disease. Inset is a SplitsTree phylogenetic network of the genus Escherichia, showing the E. albertii/Shigella boydii serotype 7/13 lineage with respect to the other named species. S. bongori, Salmonella bongori; S. enterica, Salmonella enterica. Scale bars indicate genetic distance.

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