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Volume 16, Number 6—June 2010

Dispatch

Pneumovirus in Dogs with Acute Respiratory Disease

Randall W. Renshaw, Nancy C. Zylich, Melissa A. Laverack, Amy L. Glaser, and Edward J. DuboviComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA

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Figure

Slides showing immunofluorescence of A72 cells with human respiratory syncytial virus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A) MAb 2G122 on infected cells. B) MAb 2G122 on uninfected cells. C) MAb 5H5N on infected cells. D) MAb 5H5N on uninfected cells. Primary MAb stocks were used as obtained from the manufacturer at a dilution of 1:100. The red background is produced by counterstaining with Evans blue dye. Original magnification ×200.

Figure. Slides showing immunofluorescence of A72 cells with human respiratory syncytial virus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A) MAb 2G122 on infected cells. B) MAb 2G122 on uninfected cells. C) MAb 5H5N on infected cells. D) MAb 5H5N on uninfected cells. Primary MAb stocks were used as obtained from the manufacturer at a dilution of 1:100. The red background is produced by counterstaining with Evans blue dye. Original magnification ×200.

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