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Volume 17, Number 9—September 2011

Research

Central Venous Catheter–associated Nocardia Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

Fadi Al Akhrass, Ray Hachem, Jamal A. Mohamed, Jeffrey Tarrand, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, Jyotsna Chandra, Mahmoud Ghannoum, Souha Haydoura, Ann Marie Chaftari, and Issam RaadComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA (F. Al Akhrass, R. Hachem, J.A. Mohamed, J. Tarrand, D.P. Kontoyiannis, A.M. Chaftari, I. Raad); Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (J. Chandra, M. Ghannoum); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland (J. Chandra, M. Ghannoum); Kansas University School of Medicine, Wichita, Kansas, USA (S. Haydoura)

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Figure 1

Nocardia nova and N. puris quantitative biofilm formation, as assessed by biofilm colonization model. Nocardia spp. isolates adhered to polyurethane (A) and silicone (B) central venous catheter segments with extensive biofilms. CLABSI, central line–associated bloodstream infection.

Figure 1Nocardia nova and N. puris quantitative biofilm formation, as assessed by biofilm colonization model. Nocardia spp. isolates adhered to polyurethane (A) and silicone (B) central venous catheter segments with extensive biofilms. CLABSI, central line–associated bloodstream infection.

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