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Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012

Synopsis

Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease

Samuel E. Saunders1, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt, and Jason C. BartzComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, Nebraska, USA (S.E. Saunders, S.L. Bartelt-Hunt); Creighton University, Omaha (J.C. Bartz)

Main Article

Figure 2

Annual surveillance of free-ranging cervids for chronic wasting disease (CWD). A) Number of US states and Canadian provinces conducting limited or extensive CWD surveillance of free-ranging cervids. B) Number of cervids tested by species each year/season. Other/unspecified includes black-tailed deer, moose, caribou, and data that could not be separated by species. C) Number of CWD-positive cervid samples (CWD cases) by species each year/season. Less than 5 moose were positive. Data were obtained

Figure 2. Annual surveillance of free-ranging cervids for chronic wasting disease (CWD). A) Number of US states and Canadian provinces conducting limited or extensive CWD surveillance of free-ranging cervids. B) Number of cervids tested by species each year/season. Other/unspecified includes black-tailed deer, moose, caribou, and data that could not be separated by species. C) Number of CWD-positive cervid samples (CWD cases) by species each year/season. Less than 5 moose were positive. Data were obtained from state and provincial wildlife agencies. Asterisks indicate preliminary or approximated 2010 data.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Stanford Law School, Stanford, California, USA.

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