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Volume 19, Number 7—July 2013

Dispatch

Asynchronous Onset of Clinical Disease in BSE-Infected Macaques

Judith Montag1, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer, Annette Schrod, Gerhard Hunsmann, and Dirk MotzkusComments to Author 
Author affiliations: German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany (J. Montag, A. Schrod, G. Hunsmann, D. Motzkus); University of Göttingen, Göttingen (W. Schulz-Schaeffer)

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Figure 1

Survival of intracerebrally BSE-infected cynomolgus macaques. Six age- and sex-matched cynomolgus macaques were inoculated intracerebrally with 50 mg brain homogenate (10% in sucrose) derived from 11 BSE-infected cattle. Macaques were euthanized at severe signs of neurodegenerative disease. The animals were grouped according to early (<1,200 dpi, n = 4) or late (>1,200 dpi, n = 2) onset of disease. The respective survival curves were compared by using a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, p<0.05

Figure 1. . . Survival of intracerebrally BSE-infected cynomolgus macaques. Six age- and sex-matched cynomolgus macaques were inoculated intracerebrally with 50 mg brain homogenate (10% in sucrose) derived from 11 BSE-infected cattle. Macaques were euthanized at severe signs of neurodegenerative disease. The animals were grouped according to early (<1,200 dpi, n = 4) or late (>1,200 dpi, n = 2) onset of disease. The respective survival curves were compared by using a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, p<0.05). BSE, bovine spongiform encephalopathy; dpi, days postinfection.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

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