Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 20, Number 6—June 2014

Research

Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya

Charles N. AgotiComments to Author , James R. Otieno, Caroline W. Gitahi, Patricia A. Cane, and D. James Nokes
Author affiliations: Kenya Medical Research Institute–Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kilifi, Kenya (C.N. Agoti, J.R. Otieno, C.W. Gitahi, D.J. Nokes); Public Health England, London, UK (P.A. Cane); University of Warwick and WIDER, Coventry, UK (D.J. Nokes)

Main Article

Figure 1

A) Number of persons positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genotype ON1 during 2 infection waves, Kilifi, Kenya, 2012. Blue line indicates cases of RSV group A infection; red line indicates cases of RSV group B infection; bars indicate number of ON1 case-patients admitted to Kilifi District Hospital during January 1–December 31, 2012. The first ON1 infection wave (green shading) overlapped with a 2011–12 RSV epidemic, and the second ON1 infection wave (blue shading) overlapped with a 20

Figure 1. A) Number of persons positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genotype ON1 during 2 infection waves, Kilifi, Kenya, 2012Blue line indicates cases of RSV group A infection; red line indicates cases of RSV group B infection; bars indicate number of ON1 case-patients admitted to Kilifi District Hospital during January 1–December 31, 2012The first ON1 infection wave (green shading) overlapped with a 2011–12 RSV epidemic, and the second ON1 infection wave (blue shading) overlapped with a 2012–13 RSV epidemic (see arrows above graph)B) Lifespans of the main ON1 lineages observed at KilifiNumbers inside arrows indicate the number of sequences for the lineage named at the far left.

Main Article

TOP