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Volume 20, Number 6—June 2014

Volume 20, Number 6—June 2014   PDF Version [PDF - 20.90 MB - 179 pages]

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark PDF Version [PDF - 417 KB - 7 pages]
    S. Nielsen et al.
    View Summary

    Complications were identified in only 9 pregnancies during 2007–2011.

        View Abstract

    A high risk for obstetric complications has been reported among women infected with Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, but recent studies have failed to confirm these findings. We reviewed national data collected in Denmark during 2007–2011 and found 19 pregnancies in 12 women during which the mother had a positive or equivocal test for antibodies to C. burnetii (IgM phase I and II titers >64, IgG phase I and II titers >128). Of these 12 women, 4 experienced obstetric complications (miscarriage, preterm delivery, infant small for gestational age, oligohydramnion, fetal growth restriction, or perinatal death); these complications occurred in 9 pregnancies (47% of the 19 total pregnancies identified). Our findings suggest an association between Q fever and adverse pregnancy outcomes, but complications were identified in only 9 pregnancies during the study’s 5-year period, indicating that the overall risk is low.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nielsen S, Mølbak K, Henriksen T, Krogfelt K, Larsen C, Villumsen S, et al. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):925-931. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130584
    AMA Nielsen S, Mølbak K, Henriksen T, et al. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):925-931. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130584.
    APA Nielsen, S., Mølbak, K., Henriksen, T., Krogfelt, K., Larsen, C., & Villumsen, S. (2014). Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 925-931. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130584.

Research

  • Short-Term Malaria Reduction by Single-Dose Azithromycin during Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma, Tanzania PDF Version [PDF - 542 KB - 9 pages]
    S. E. Schachterle et al.
    View Summary

    This drug might be beneficial in areas to which malaria and trachoma are endemic.

        View Abstract

    Single-dose mass drug administration of azithromycin (AZT) is underway to eliminate trachoma worldwide. Studies in Ethiopia showed a reduction in all-cause childhood deaths after administration. To examine the effect of single-dose AZ MDA on prevalent malaria infections in a large prospective cohort of children and parents in Dodoma Province, Tanzania, we quantified the temporal prevalence of malaria parasitemia by real-time PCR for 6 months after single-dose AZT. In the first month after treatment but not in subsequent months, Plasmodium falciparum infections were reduced by 73% (95% CI 43%–89%) in treatment versus control villages and differences remained significant (p = 0.00497) in multivariate models with village-level random effects. Genetic sequencing of P. falciparum ribosomal L4 protein showed no mutations associated with AZT resistance. AZT mass drug administration caused a transient, 1-month antimalarial effect without selecting for P. falciparum ribosomal L4 resistance mutations in a region with a 10-year history of treating trachoma with this drug.

        Cite This Article
    EID Schachterle SE, Mtove G, Levens JP, Clemens E, Shi L, Raj A, et al. Short-Term Malaria Reduction by Single-Dose Azithromycin during Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma, Tanzania. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):941-949. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131302
    AMA Schachterle SE, Mtove G, Levens JP, et al. Short-Term Malaria Reduction by Single-Dose Azithromycin during Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma, Tanzania. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):941-949. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131302.
    APA Schachterle, S. E., Mtove, G., Levens, J. P., Clemens, E., Shi, L., Raj, A....Sullivan, D. J. (2014). Short-Term Malaria Reduction by Single-Dose Azithromycin during Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma, Tanzania. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 941-949. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131302.
  • Human Polyomavirus 9 Infection in Kidney Transplant Patients PDF Version [PDF - 2.46 MB - 9 pages]
    E. van der Meijden et al.
    View Summary

    This virus is frequently found within the first year after transplantation and in association with BK polyomavirus infection.

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    Several human polyomaviruses of unknown prevalence and pathogenicity have been identified, including human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9). To determine rates of HPyV9 infection among immunosuppressed patients, we screened serum samples from 101 kidney transplant patients in the Netherlands for HPyV9 DNA and seroreactivity. A total of 21 patients had positive results for HPyV9 DNA; positivity rates peaked at 3 months after transplantation, but the highest viral loads were measured just after transplantation. During 18 months of follow-up, HPyV9 seroprevalence increased from 33% to 46% among transplant patients; seroprevalence remained stable at ≈30% in a control group of healthy blood donors in whom no HPyV9 DNA was detected. Further analysis revealed an association between detection of HPyV9 and detection of BK polyomavirus but not of cytomegalovirus. Our data indicate that HPyV9 infection is frequent in kidney transplant patients, but the nature of infection—endogenous or donor-derived—and pathogenic potential of this virus remain unknown.

        Cite This Article
    EID van der Meijden E, Wunderink HF, van der Blij-de Brouwer CS, Zaaijer HL, Rotmans JI, Bavinck J, et al. Human Polyomavirus 9 Infection in Kidney Transplant Patients. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):991-999. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140055
    AMA van der Meijden E, Wunderink HF, van der Blij-de Brouwer CS, et al. Human Polyomavirus 9 Infection in Kidney Transplant Patients. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):991-999. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140055.
    APA van der Meijden, E., Wunderink, H. F., van der Blij-de Brouwer, C. S., Zaaijer, H. L., Rotmans, J. I., Bavinck, J....Feltkamp, M. (2014). Human Polyomavirus 9 Infection in Kidney Transplant Patients. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 991-999. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140055.
  • Oral Fluid Testing for Pertussis, England and Wales, June 2007–August 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 531 KB - 8 pages]
    H. Campbell et al.
    View Summary

    Follow-up testing of reported cases resulted in a 32% increase in confirmed cases, especially among young children, adolescents, and those with milder disease.

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    Existing pertussis surveillance systems tend to underidentify less severe cases among older children and adults. For routine follow-up of notified, nonconfirmed, clinically diagnosed pertussis cases, use of an oral fluid test was pilot tested in England and Wales during June 2007–August 2009. During that period, 1,852 cases of pertussis were confirmed by established laboratory methods and another 591 by oral fluid testing only. Although introduction of serologic testing in 2002 led to the greatest increase in ascertainment of pertussis, oral fluid testing increased laboratory ascertainment by 32% overall; maximal increase (124%) occurred among children 5–9 years of age. Patients whose pertussis was confirmed by oral fluid testing were least likely to be hospitalized, suggesting that milder community cases were being confirmed by this method. Oral fluid testing is an easily administered, noninvasive surveillance tool that could further our understanding of pertussis epidemiology and thereby contribute to decisions on vaccination strategies.

        Cite This Article
    EID Campbell H, Amirthalingam G, Fry NK, Litt D, Harrison TG, Wagner K, et al. Oral Fluid Testing for Pertussis, England and Wales, June 2007–August 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):968-975. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131069
    AMA Campbell H, Amirthalingam G, Fry NK, et al. Oral Fluid Testing for Pertussis, England and Wales, June 2007–August 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):968-975. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131069.
    APA Campbell, H., Amirthalingam, G., Fry, N. K., Litt, D., Harrison, T. G., Wagner, K....Miller, E. (2014). Oral Fluid Testing for Pertussis, England and Wales, June 2007–August 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 968-975. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131069.
  • Genetic Evidence of Importation of Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum to Guatemala from the Democratic Republic of the Congo PDF Version [PDF - 660 KB - 9 pages]
    J. C. Patel et al.
    View Summary

    Molecular markers and population genetics were effective tracking tools.

        View Abstract

    Imported malaria threatens control and elimination efforts in countries that have low rates of transmission. In 2010, an outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria was reported among United Nations peacekeeping soldiers from Guatemala who had recently returned from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Epidemiologic evidence suggested that the soldiers were infected in the DRC, but local transmission could not be ruled out in all cases. We used population genetic analyses of neutral microsatellites to determine the outbreak source. Genetic relatedness was compared among parasites found in samples from the soldiers and parasite populations collected in the DRC and Guatemala; parasites identified in the soldiers were more closely related to those from the DRC. A phylogenetic clustering analysis confirms this identification with >99.9% confidence. Thus, results support the hypothesis that the soldiers likely imported malaria from the DRC. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular genotyping in outbreak investigations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Patel JC, Taylor SM, Juliao PC, Parobek CM, Janko M, Gonzalez L, et al. Genetic Evidence of Importation of Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum to Guatemala from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):932-940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131204
    AMA Patel JC, Taylor SM, Juliao PC, et al. Genetic Evidence of Importation of Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum to Guatemala from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):932-940. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131204.
    APA Patel, J. C., Taylor, S. M., Juliao, P. C., Parobek, C. M., Janko, M., Gonzalez, L....Meshnick, S. R. (2014). Genetic Evidence of Importation of Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum to Guatemala from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 932-940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131204.
  • Characteristics of Patients with Mild to Moderate Primary Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis PDF Version [PDF - 474 KB - 8 pages]
    J. E. Blair et al.
    View Summary

    Convalescence is prolonged, regardless of whether the patient receives treatment.

        View Abstract

    In Arizona, USA, primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis accounts for 15%–29% of community-acquired pneumonia. To determine the evolution of symptoms and changes in laboratory values for patients with mild to moderate coccidioidomycosis during 2010–2012, we conducted a prospective 24-week study of patients with primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Of the 36 patients, 16 (44%) were men and 33 (92%) were White. Median age was 53 years, and 20 (56%) had received antifungal treatment at baseline. Symptom scores were higher for patients who received treatment than for those who did not. Median times from symptom onset to 50% reduction and to complete resolution for patients in treatment and nontreatment groups were 9.9 and 9.1 weeks, and 18.7 and 17.8 weeks, respectively. Median times to full return to work were 8.4 and 5.7 weeks, respectively. One patient who received treatment experienced disseminated infection. For otherwise healthy adults with acute coccidioidomycosis, convalescence was prolonged, regardless of whether they received antifungal treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Blair JE, Chang YH, Cheng M, Vaszar LT, Vikram HR, Orenstein R, et al. Characteristics of Patients with Mild to Moderate Primary Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):983-990. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131842
    AMA Blair JE, Chang YH, Cheng M, et al. Characteristics of Patients with Mild to Moderate Primary Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):983-990. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131842.
    APA Blair, J. E., Chang, Y. H., Cheng, M., Vaszar, L. T., Vikram, H. R., Orenstein, R....Parish, J. M. (2014). Characteristics of Patients with Mild to Moderate Primary Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 983-990. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131842.
  • High Prevalence of Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworm Infections in Humans, Cambodia, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 660 KB - 7 pages]
    T. Inpankaew et al.
    View Summary

    Preventative chemotherapy without community hygiene and animal health programs may be leading to emergence of this zoonosis.

        View Abstract

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum, a hookworm of canids and felids in Asia, is becoming the second most common hookworm infecting humans. In 2012, we investigated the prevalence and infection dynamics of and risk factors for hookworm infections in humans and dogs in a rural Cambodian village. Over 57% of the population was infected with hookworms; of those, 52% harbored A. ceylanicum hookworms. The greatest intensities of A. ceylanicum eggs were in persons 21-30 years of age. Over 90% of dogs also harbored A. ceylanicum hookworms. Characterization of the cytochrome oxidase-1 gene divided isolates of A. ceylanicum hookworms into 2 groups, 1 containing isolates from humans only and the other a mix of isolates from humans and animals. We hypothesize that preventative chemotherapy in the absence of concurrent hygiene and animal health programs may be a factor leading to emergence of A. ceylanicum infections; thus, we advocate for a One Health approach to control this zoonosis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Inpankaew T, Schär F, Dalsgaard A, Khieu V, Chimnoi W, Chhoun C, et al. High Prevalence of Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworm Infections in Humans, Cambodia, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):976-982. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131770
    AMA Inpankaew T, Schär F, Dalsgaard A, et al. High Prevalence of Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworm Infections in Humans, Cambodia, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):976-982. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131770.
    APA Inpankaew, T., Schär, F., Dalsgaard, A., Khieu, V., Chimnoi, W., Chhoun, C....Traub, R. J. (2014). High Prevalence of Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworm Infections in Humans, Cambodia, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 976-982. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131770.
  • Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya PDF Version [PDF - 882 KB - 10 pages]
    C. N. Agoti et al.
    View Summary

    Surveillance of this new genotype helps clarify the mechanisms of rapid emergence of respiratory viruses.

        View Abstract

    Respiratory syncytial virus genotype ON1, which is characterized by a 72-nt duplication in the attachment protein gene, has been detected in >10 countries since first identified in Ontario, Canada, in 2010. We describe 2 waves of genotype ON1 infections among children admitted to a rural hospital in Kenya during 2012. Phylogenetic analysis of attachment protein gene sequences showed multiple introductions of genotype ON1; variants distinct from the original Canadian viruses predominated in both infection waves. The genotype ON1 dominated over the other group A genotypes during the second wave, and some first wave ON1 variants reappeared in the second wave. An analysis of global genotype ON1 sequences determined that this genotype has become considerably diversified and has acquired signature coding mutations within immunogenic regions, and its most recent common ancestor dates to ≈2008–2009. Surveillance of genotype ON1 contributes to an understanding of the mechanisms of rapid emergence of respiratory viruses.

        Cite This Article
    EID Agoti CN, Otieno JR, Gitahi CW, Cane PA, Nokes D. Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):950-959. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131438
    AMA Agoti CN, Otieno JR, Gitahi CW, et al. Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):950-959. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131438.
    APA Agoti, C. N., Otieno, J. R., Gitahi, C. W., Cane, P. A., & Nokes, D. (2014). Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 950-959. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131438.
  • Bats as Reservoir Hosts of Human Bacterial Pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis PDF Version [PDF - 818 KB - 8 pages]
    V. Veikkolainen et al.
    View Summary

    Bats can be potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens.

        View Abstract

    A plethora of pathogenic viruses colonize bats. However, bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain ill defined. In a study initially conducted as a quantitative metagenomic analysis of the fecal bacterial flora of the Daubenton’s bat in Finland, we unexpectedly detected DNA of several hemotrophic and ectoparasite-transmitted bacterial genera, including Bartonella. Bartonella spp. also were either detected or isolated from the peripheral blood of Daubenton's, northern, and whiskered bats and were detected in the ectoparasites of Daubenton's, northern, and Brandt's bats. The blood isolates belong to the Candidatus-status species B. mayotimonensis, a recently identified etiologic agent of endocarditis in humans, and a new Bartonella species (B. naantaliensis sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis of bat-colonizing Bartonella spp. throughout the world demonstrates a distinct B. mayotimonensis cluster in the Northern Hemisphere. The findings of this field study highlight bats as potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens.

        Cite This Article
    EID Veikkolainen V, Vesterinen EJ, Lilley TM, Pulliainen AT. Bats as Reservoir Hosts of Human Bacterial Pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):960-967. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130956
    AMA Veikkolainen V, Vesterinen EJ, Lilley TM, et al. Bats as Reservoir Hosts of Human Bacterial Pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):960-967. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130956.
    APA Veikkolainen, V., Vesterinen, E. J., Lilley, T. M., & Pulliainen, A. T. (2014). Bats as Reservoir Hosts of Human Bacterial Pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 960-967. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130956.

Dispatches

  • Dengue Virus Type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 371 KB - 3 pages]
    V. Cao-Lormeau et al.
        View Abstract

    After an 18-year absence, dengue virus serotype 3 reemerged in the South Pacific Islands in 2013. Outbreaks in western (Solomon Islands) and eastern (French Polynesia) regions were caused by different genotypes. This finding suggested that immunity against dengue virus serotype, rather than virus genotype, was the principal determinant of reemergence.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cao-Lormeau V, Roche C, Musso D, Mallet H, Dalipanda T, Dofai A, et al. Dengue Virus Type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1034-1036. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131413
    AMA Cao-Lormeau V, Roche C, Musso D, et al. Dengue Virus Type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1034-1036. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131413.
    APA Cao-Lormeau, V., Roche, C., Musso, D., Mallet, H., Dalipanda, T., Dofai, A....Aaskov, J. (2014). Dengue Virus Type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1034-1036. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131413.
  • Identification of Possible Virulence Marker from Campylobacter jejuni Isolates PDF Version [PDF - 511 KB - 4 pages]
    J. W. Harrison et al.
        View Abstract

    A novel protein translocation system, the type-6 secretion system (T6SS), may play a role in virulence of Campylobacter jejuni. We investigated 181 C. jejuni isolates from humans, chickens, and environmental sources in Vietnam, Thailand, Pakistan, and the United Kingdom for T6SS. The marker was most prevalent in human and chicken isolates from Vietnam.

        Cite This Article
    EID Harrison JW, Dung T, Siddiqui F, Korbrisate S, Bukhari H, Tra M, et al. Identification of Possible Virulence Marker from Campylobacter jejuni Isolates. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1026-1029. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130635
    AMA Harrison JW, Dung T, Siddiqui F, et al. Identification of Possible Virulence Marker from Campylobacter jejuni Isolates. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1026-1029. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130635.
    APA Harrison, J. W., Dung, T., Siddiqui, F., Korbrisate, S., Bukhari, H., Tra, M....Champion, O. L. (2014). Identification of Possible Virulence Marker from Campylobacter jejuni Isolates. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1026-1029. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130635.
  • MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt PDF Version [PDF - 568 KB - 5 pages]
    D. Chu et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified the near-full-genome sequence (29,908 nt, >99%) of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a nasal swab specimen from a dromedary camel in Egypt. We found that viruses genetically very similar to human MERS-CoV are infecting dromedaries beyond the Arabian Peninsula, where human MERS-CoV infections have not yet been detected.

        Cite This Article
    EID Chu D, Poon L, Gomaa MM, Shehata MM, Perera R, Abu Zeid D, et al. MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1049-1053. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140299
    AMA Chu D, Poon L, Gomaa MM, et al. MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1049-1053. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140299.
    APA Chu, D., Poon, L., Gomaa, M. M., Shehata, M. M., Perera, R., Abu Zeid, D....Kayali, G. (2014). MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1049-1053. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140299.
  • Timeliness of Yellow Fever Surveillance, Central African Republic PDF Version [PDF - 583 KB - 5 pages]
    A. Rachas et al.
        View Abstract

    During January 2007–July 2012, a total of 3,220 suspected yellow fever cases were reported in the Central African Republic; 55 were confirmed and 11 case-patients died. Mean delay between onset of jaundice and case confirmation was 16.6 days. Delay between disease onset and blood collection could be reduced by increasing awareness of the population.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rachas A, Nakouné E, Bouscaillou J, Paireau J, Selekon B, Senekian D, et al. Timeliness of Yellow Fever Surveillance, Central African Republic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1004-1008. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130671
    AMA Rachas A, Nakouné E, Bouscaillou J, et al. Timeliness of Yellow Fever Surveillance, Central African Republic. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1004-1008. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130671.
    APA Rachas, A., Nakouné, E., Bouscaillou, J., Paireau, J., Selekon, B., Senekian, D....Kazanji, M. (2014). Timeliness of Yellow Fever Surveillance, Central African Republic. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1004-1008. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130671.
  • Sequential Gastroenteritis Episodes Caused by 2 Norovirus Genotypes PDF Version [PDF - 389 KB - 3 pages]
    G. I. Parra and K. Y. Green
        View Abstract

    We investigated sequential episodes of acute norovirus gastroenteritis in a young child within an 11-month period. The infections were caused by 2 distinct genotypes (GII.4 and GII.6). Failure to achieve cross-protective immunity was linked to absence of an enduring and cross-reactive mucosal immune response, a critical consideration for vaccine design.

        Cite This Article
    EID Parra GI, Green KY. Sequential Gastroenteritis Episodes Caused by 2 Norovirus Genotypes. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1016-1018. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131627
    AMA Parra GI, Green KY. Sequential Gastroenteritis Episodes Caused by 2 Norovirus Genotypes. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1016-1018. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131627.
    APA Parra, G. I., & Green, K. Y. (2014). Sequential Gastroenteritis Episodes Caused by 2 Norovirus Genotypes. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1016-1018. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131627.
  • New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East PDF Version [PDF - 1.09 MB - 5 pages]
    P. Woo et al.
        View Abstract

    In a molecular epidemiology study of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in dromedaries in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, HEV was detected in fecal samples from 3 camels. Complete genome sequencing of 2 strains showed >20% overall nucleotide difference to known HEVs. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized HEV genotype.

        Cite This Article
    EID Woo P, Lau S, Teng J, Tsang A, Joseph M, Wong E, et al. New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1044-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140140
    AMA Woo P, Lau S, Teng J, et al. New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1044-1048. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140140.
    APA Woo, P., Lau, S., Teng, J., Tsang, A., Joseph, M., Wong, E....Yuen, K. (2014). New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1044-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140140.
  • Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana PDF Version [PDF - 369 KB - 4 pages]
    R. O. Phillips et al.
        View Abstract

    During August 2010–December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer.

        Cite This Article
    EID Phillips RO, Frimpong M, Sarfo FS, Kretschmer B, Beissner M, Debrah A, et al. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1000-1003. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131501
    AMA Phillips RO, Frimpong M, Sarfo FS, et al. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1000-1003. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131501.
    APA Phillips, R. O., Frimpong, M., Sarfo, F. S., Kretschmer, B., Beissner, M., Debrah, A....Jacobsen, M. (2014). Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1000-1003. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131501.
  • Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 776 KB - 4 pages]
    Z. A. Memish et al.
        View Abstract

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Memish ZA, Cotten M, Meyer B, Watson SJ, Alsahafi AJ, Al Rabeeah AA, et al. Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1012-1015. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140402
    AMA Memish ZA, Cotten M, Meyer B, et al. Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1012-1015. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140402.
    APA Memish, Z. A., Cotten, M., Meyer, B., Watson, S. J., Alsahafi, A. J., Al Rabeeah, A. A....Drosten, C. (2014). Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1012-1015. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140402.
  • Novel Phlebovirus with Zoonotic Potential Isolated from Ticks, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 679 KB - 4 pages]
    J. Wang et al.
        View Abstract

    Recently discovered tick-borne phleboviruses have been associated with severe disease and death among persons in Asia and the United States. We report the discovery of a novel tick phlebovirus in Tasmania State, Australia, that is closely related to those zoonotic viruses found in Asia and North America.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wang J, Selleck P, Yu M, Ha W, Rootes C, Gales R, et al. Novel Phlebovirus with Zoonotic Potential Isolated from Ticks, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1040-1043. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140003
    AMA Wang J, Selleck P, Yu M, et al. Novel Phlebovirus with Zoonotic Potential Isolated from Ticks, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1040-1043. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140003.
    APA Wang, J., Selleck, P., Yu, M., Ha, W., Rootes, C., Gales, R....Wang, L. (2014). Novel Phlebovirus with Zoonotic Potential Isolated from Ticks, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1040-1043. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140003.
  • Novel Human Bufavirus Genotype 3 in Children with Severe Diarrhea, Bhutan PDF Version [PDF - 359 KB - 3 pages]
    T. Yahiro et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified a new genotype of bufavirus, BuV3, in fecal samples (0.8%) collected to determine the etiology of diarrhea in children in Bhutan. Norovirus GII.6 was detected in 1 sample; no other viral diarrheal pathogens were detected, suggesting BuV3 as a cause of diarrhea. This study investigates genetic diversity of circulating BuVs.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yahiro T, Wangchuk S, Tshering K, Bandhari P, Zangmo S, Dorji T, et al. Novel Human Bufavirus Genotype 3 in Children with Severe Diarrhea, Bhutan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1037-1039. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131430
    AMA Yahiro T, Wangchuk S, Tshering K, et al. Novel Human Bufavirus Genotype 3 in Children with Severe Diarrhea, Bhutan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1037-1039. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131430.
    APA Yahiro, T., Wangchuk, S., Tshering, K., Bandhari, P., Zangmo, S., Dorji, T....Ahmed, K. (2014). Novel Human Bufavirus Genotype 3 in Children with Severe Diarrhea, Bhutan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1037-1039. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131430.
  • Fatal Monkeypox in Wild-Living Sooty Mangabey, Côte d’Ivoire, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 396 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Radonić et al.
        View Abstract

    We isolated a monkeypox virus from a wild-living monkey, a sooty mangabey, found dead in Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire, in March 2012. The whole-genome sequence obtained from this isolate and directly from clinical specimens showed its close relationship to monkeypox viruses from Western Africa.

        Cite This Article
    EID Radonić A, Metzger S, Dabrowski P, Couacy-Hymann E, Schuenadel L, Kurth A, et al. Fatal Monkeypox in Wild-Living Sooty Mangabey, Côte d’Ivoire, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1009-1011. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131329
    AMA Radonić A, Metzger S, Dabrowski P, et al. Fatal Monkeypox in Wild-Living Sooty Mangabey, Côte d’Ivoire, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1009-1011. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131329.
    APA Radonić, A., Metzger, S., Dabrowski, P., Couacy-Hymann, E., Schuenadel, L., Kurth, A....Nitsche, A. (2014). Fatal Monkeypox in Wild-Living Sooty Mangabey, Côte d’Ivoire, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1009-1011. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131329.
  • Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by a DS-1–like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strain, Japan, 2012–2013 PDF Version [PDF - 425 KB - 4 pages]
    S. P. Yamamoto et al.
        View Abstract

    Rotavirus A (RVA) genotype G1P[8], a hallmark of the Wa-like strain, typically contains only genotype 1 genes. However, an unusual RVA G1P[8] with genotype 2 genes was recently detected in Japan. We determined the complete genomic constellation of this RVA. Our findings suggest that mixed RVAs may be more competitive than once thought.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yamamoto SP, Kaida A, Kubo H, Iritani N. Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by a DS-1–like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strain, Japan, 2012–2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1030-1033. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131326
    AMA Yamamoto SP, Kaida A, Kubo H, et al. Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by a DS-1–like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strain, Japan, 2012–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1030-1033. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131326.
    APA Yamamoto, S. P., Kaida, A., Kubo, H., & Iritani, N. (2014). Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by a DS-1–like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strain, Japan, 2012–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1030-1033. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131326.
  • Iatrogenic Meningitis Caused by Neisseria sicca/subflava after Intrathecal Contrast Injection, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 1.56 MB - 3 pages]
    D. Entesari-Tatafi et al.
        View Abstract

    We report a case of invasive Neisseria sicca/subflava meningitis after a spinal injection procedure during which a face mask was not worn by the proceduralist. The report highlights the importance of awareness of, and adherence to, guidelines for protective face mask use during procedures that require sterile conditions.

        Cite This Article
    EID Entesari-Tatafi D, Bagherirad M, Quan D, Athan E. Iatrogenic Meningitis Caused by Neisseria sicca/subflava after Intrathecal Contrast Injection, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1023-1025. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131117
    AMA Entesari-Tatafi D, Bagherirad M, Quan D, et al. Iatrogenic Meningitis Caused by Neisseria sicca/subflava after Intrathecal Contrast Injection, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1023-1025. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131117.
    APA Entesari-Tatafi, D., Bagherirad, M., Quan, D., & Athan, E. (2014). Iatrogenic Meningitis Caused by Neisseria sicca/subflava after Intrathecal Contrast Injection, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1023-1025. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131117.
  • Species H Rotavirus Detected in Piglets with Diarrhea, Brazil, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 2.47 MB - 4 pages]
    B. Molinari et al.
        View Abstract

    We determined nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the rotavirus gene encoding viral protein 6 from 3 fecal samples collected from piglets with diarrhea in Brazil, 2012. The analyses showed that the porcine rotavirus strains in Brazil are closely related to the novel species H rotavirus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Molinari B, Lorenzetti E, Otonel R, Alfieri AF, Alfieri AA. Species H Rotavirus Detected in Piglets with Diarrhea, Brazil, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1019-1022. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130776
    AMA Molinari B, Lorenzetti E, Otonel R, et al. Species H Rotavirus Detected in Piglets with Diarrhea, Brazil, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1019-1022. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130776.
    APA Molinari, B., Lorenzetti, E., Otonel, R., Alfieri, A. F., & Alfieri, A. A. (2014). Species H Rotavirus Detected in Piglets with Diarrhea, Brazil, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1019-1022. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130776.

Commentaries

Letters

  • Genetic Relatedness of Dolphin Rhabdovirus with Fish Rhabdoviruses PDF Version [PDF - 261 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Y. Siegers et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Siegers JY, van de Bildt M, van Elk CE, Schürch AC, Tordo N, Kuiken T, et al. Genetic Relatedness of Dolphin Rhabdovirus with Fish Rhabdoviruses. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1081-1082. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131880
    AMA Siegers JY, van de Bildt M, van Elk CE, et al. Genetic Relatedness of Dolphin Rhabdovirus with Fish Rhabdoviruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1081-1082. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131880.
    APA Siegers, J. Y., van de Bildt, M., van Elk, C. E., Schürch, A. C., Tordo, N., Kuiken, T....Osterhaus, A. (2014). Genetic Relatedness of Dolphin Rhabdovirus with Fish Rhabdoviruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1081-1082. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131880.
  • Schmallenberg Virus Circulation in High Mountain Ecosystem, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 708 KB - 3 pages]
    X. Fernández-Aguilar et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Fernández-Aguilar X, Pujols J, Velarde R, Rosell R, López-Olvera JR, Marco I, et al. Schmallenberg Virus Circulation in High Mountain Ecosystem, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1062-1064. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130961
    AMA Fernández-Aguilar X, Pujols J, Velarde R, et al. Schmallenberg Virus Circulation in High Mountain Ecosystem, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1062-1064. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130961.
    APA Fernández-Aguilar, X., Pujols, J., Velarde, R., Rosell, R., López-Olvera, J. R., Marco, I....Cabezón, O. (2014). Schmallenberg Virus Circulation in High Mountain Ecosystem, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1062-1064. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130961.
  • Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis Reservoirs, Cusco, Peru PDF Version [PDF - 268 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Martin-Alonso et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Martin-Alonso A, Soto M, Foronda P, Aguilar E, Bonnet G, Pacheco R, et al. Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis Reservoirs, Cusco, Peru. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1069-1070. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131194
    AMA Martin-Alonso A, Soto M, Foronda P, et al. Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis Reservoirs, Cusco, Peru. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1069-1070. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131194.
    APA Martin-Alonso, A., Soto, M., Foronda, P., Aguilar, E., Bonnet, G., Pacheco, R....Quispe-Ricalde, M. A. (2014). Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis Reservoirs, Cusco, Peru. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1069-1070. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131194.
  • Diagnosis of Trombiculosis by Videodermatoscopy PDF Version [PDF - 638 KB - 2 pages]
    M. R. Nasca et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Nasca MR, Lacarrubba F, Micali G. Diagnosis of Trombiculosis by Videodermatoscopy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1059-1060. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130767
    AMA Nasca MR, Lacarrubba F, Micali G. Diagnosis of Trombiculosis by Videodermatoscopy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1059-1060. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130767.
    APA Nasca, M. R., Lacarrubba, F., & Micali, G. (2014). Diagnosis of Trombiculosis by Videodermatoscopy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1059-1060. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130767.
  • Novel Henipa-like Virus, Mojiang Paramyxovirus, in Rats, China, 2012 PDF Version [PDF - 409 KB - 3 pages]
    Z. Wu et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Wu Z, Yang L, Yang F, Ren X, Jiang J, Dong J, et al. Novel Henipa-like Virus, Mojiang Paramyxovirus, in Rats, China, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1064-1066. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131022
    AMA Wu Z, Yang L, Yang F, et al. Novel Henipa-like Virus, Mojiang Paramyxovirus, in Rats, China, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1064-1066. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131022.
    APA Wu, Z., Yang, L., Yang, F., Ren, X., Jiang, J., Dong, J....Jin, Q. (2014). Novel Henipa-like Virus, Mojiang Paramyxovirus, in Rats, China, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1064-1066. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131022.
  • Streptococcus suis Infection and Malignancy in Man, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 277 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Gómez-Zorrilla et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Gómez-Zorrilla S, Ardanuy C, Lora-Tamayo J, Cámara J, García-Somoza D, Peña C, et al. Streptococcus suis Infection and Malignancy in Man, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1067-1068. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131167
    AMA Gómez-Zorrilla S, Ardanuy C, Lora-Tamayo J, et al. Streptococcus suis Infection and Malignancy in Man, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1067-1068. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131167.
    APA Gómez-Zorrilla, S., Ardanuy, C., Lora-Tamayo, J., Cámara, J., García-Somoza, D., Peña, C....Ariza, J. (2014). Streptococcus suis Infection and Malignancy in Man, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1067-1068. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131167.
  • Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis Acquired in Scotland, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 281 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Hagedorn et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Hagedorn P, Imhoff M, Fischer C, Domingo C, Niedrig M. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis Acquired in Scotland, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1079-1081. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131849
    AMA Hagedorn P, Imhoff M, Fischer C, et al. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis Acquired in Scotland, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1079-1081. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131849.
    APA Hagedorn, P., Imhoff, M., Fischer, C., Domingo, C., & Niedrig, M. (2014). Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis Acquired in Scotland, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1079-1081. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131849.
  • Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H5N8) Viruses, South Korea, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 485 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Lee et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lee Y, Kang H, Lee E, Song B, Jeong J, Kwon Y, et al. Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H5N8) Viruses, South Korea, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1086-1089. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140233
    AMA Lee Y, Kang H, Lee E, et al. Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H5N8) Viruses, South Korea, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1086-1089. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140233.
    APA Lee, Y., Kang, H., Lee, E., Song, B., Jeong, J., Kwon, Y....Lee, H. (2014). Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H5N8) Viruses, South Korea, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1086-1089. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140233.
  • Zika Virus, French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 317 KB - 2 pages]
    V. Cao-Lormeau et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cao-Lormeau V, Roche C, Teissier A, Robin E, Berry A, Mallet H, et al. Zika Virus, French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1084-1086. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140138
    AMA Cao-Lormeau V, Roche C, Teissier A, et al. Zika Virus, French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1084-1086. doi:10.3201/eid2006.140138.
    APA Cao-Lormeau, V., Roche, C., Teissier, A., Robin, E., Berry, A., Mallet, H....Musso, D. (2014). Zika Virus, French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1084-1086. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.140138.
  • Bufavirus in Feces of Patients with Gastroenteritis, Finland PDF Version [PDF - 421 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Väisänen et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Väisänen E, Kuisma I, Phan TG, Delwart E, Lappalainen M, Tarkka E, et al. Bufavirus in Feces of Patients with Gastroenteritis, Finland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1077-1079. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131674
    AMA Väisänen E, Kuisma I, Phan TG, et al. Bufavirus in Feces of Patients with Gastroenteritis, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1077-1079. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131674.
    APA Väisänen, E., Kuisma, I., Phan, T. G., Delwart, E., Lappalainen, M., Tarkka, E....Söderlund-Venermo, M. (2014). Bufavirus in Feces of Patients with Gastroenteritis, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1077-1079. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131674.
  • Respiratory Infection with Enterovirus Genotype C117, China and Mongolia PDF Version [PDF - 404 KB - 3 pages]
    Z. Xiang et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Xiang Z, Tsatsral S, Liu C, Li L, Ren L, Xiao Y, et al. Respiratory Infection with Enterovirus Genotype C117, China and Mongolia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1076-1078. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131596
    AMA Xiang Z, Tsatsral S, Liu C, et al. Respiratory Infection with Enterovirus Genotype C117, China and Mongolia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1076-1078. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131596.
    APA Xiang, Z., Tsatsral, S., Liu, C., Li, L., Ren, L., Xiao, Y....Wang, J. (2014). Respiratory Infection with Enterovirus Genotype C117, China and Mongolia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1076-1078. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131596.
  • Rapid Metagenomic Diagnostics for Suspected Outbreak of Severe Pneumonia PDF Version [PDF - 853 KB - 4 pages]
    N. Fischer et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Fischer N, Rohde H, Indenbirken D, Günther T, Reumann K, Lütgehetmann M, et al. Rapid Metagenomic Diagnostics for Suspected Outbreak of Severe Pneumonia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1072-1075. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131526
    AMA Fischer N, Rohde H, Indenbirken D, et al. Rapid Metagenomic Diagnostics for Suspected Outbreak of Severe Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1072-1075. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131526.
    APA Fischer, N., Rohde, H., Indenbirken, D., Günther, T., Reumann, K., Lütgehetmann, M....Grundhoff, A. (2014). Rapid Metagenomic Diagnostics for Suspected Outbreak of Severe Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1072-1075. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131526.
  • Buruli Ulcer Disease in Republic of the Congo PDF Version [PDF - 644 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Marion et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Marion E, Obvala D, Babonneau J, Kempf M, Asiedu KB, Marsollier L, et al. Buruli Ulcer Disease in Republic of the Congo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1070-1072. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131498
    AMA Marion E, Obvala D, Babonneau J, et al. Buruli Ulcer Disease in Republic of the Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1070-1072. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131498.
    APA Marion, E., Obvala, D., Babonneau, J., Kempf, M., Asiedu, K. B., & Marsollier, L. (2014). Buruli Ulcer Disease in Republic of the Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1070-1072. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131498.
  • Genetic and Ecologic Variability among Anaplasma phagocytophilum Strains, Northern Italy PDF Version [PDF - 449 KB - 4 pages]
    I. Baráková et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Baráková I, Derdáková M, Carpi G, Rosso F, Collini M, Tagliapietra V, et al. Genetic and Ecologic Variability among Anaplasma phagocytophilum Strains, Northern Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1082-1084. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131023
    AMA Baráková I, Derdáková M, Carpi G, et al. Genetic and Ecologic Variability among Anaplasma phagocytophilum Strains, Northern Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1082-1084. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131023.
    APA Baráková, I., Derdáková, M., Carpi, G., Rosso, F., Collini, M., Tagliapietra, V....Rizzoli, A. (2014). Genetic and Ecologic Variability among Anaplasma phagocytophilum Strains, Northern Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1082-1084. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131023.
  • Hepatitis E Virus Infection, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati, 2003–2005 PDF Version [PDF - 267 KB - 2 pages]
    J. S. Halliday et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Halliday JS, Harrison G, Brown A, Hunter JG, Bendall R, Penny D, et al. Hepatitis E Virus Infection, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati, 2003–2005. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1057-1058. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130562
    AMA Halliday JS, Harrison G, Brown A, et al. Hepatitis E Virus Infection, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati, 2003–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1057-1058. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130562.
    APA Halliday, J. S., Harrison, G., Brown, A., Hunter, J. G., Bendall, R., Penny, D....Dalton, H. R. (2014). Hepatitis E Virus Infection, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati, 2003–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1057-1058. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130562.
  • Possible Misidentification of Mycobacterium yongonense PDF Version [PDF - 319 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Hong and E. Kim
            Cite This Article
    EID Hong S, Kim E. Possible Misidentification of Mycobacterium yongonense. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1089. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131508
    AMA Hong S, Kim E. Possible Misidentification of Mycobacterium yongonense. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1089. doi:10.3201/eid2006.131508.
    APA Hong, S., & Kim, E. (2014). Possible Misidentification of Mycobacterium yongonense. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1089. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.131508.
  • Distinguishing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, China PDF Version [PDF - 301 KB - 3 pages]
    K. Xu et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Xu K, Bi S, Ji Z, Hu H, Hu F, Zheng B, et al. Distinguishing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1060-1062. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130700
    AMA Xu K, Bi S, Ji Z, et al. Distinguishing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1060-1062. doi:10.3201/eid2006.130700.
    APA Xu, K., Bi, S., Ji, Z., Hu, H., Hu, F., Zheng, B....Li, L. (2014). Distinguishing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1060-1062. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.130700.

About the Cover

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Zika Virus PDF Version [PDF - 254 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Etymologia: Zika Virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20(6):1090. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.ET2006
    AMA Etymologia: Zika Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014;20(6):1090. doi:10.3201/eid2006.ET2006.
    APA (2014). Etymologia: Zika Virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 20(6), 1090. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2006.ET2006.
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