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Volume 3, Number 2—June 1997

Synopsis

Hantaviruses: A Global Disease Problem

Connie Schmaljohn*Comments to Author  and Brian Hjelle
Author affiliations: *United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland, USA; and †University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

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Figure

Phylogeny of hantaviruses and their relationships to natural reservoirs. The trees were constructed by comparing the complete coding regions of the S segments of hantaviruses or of 330 nucleotides corresponding to those of the M segment of Hantaan virus (strain 76118) from nucleotides 1987 to 2315. Abrreviations for viruses are as in Table 1. For each analysis, a single most parsimonious tree was derived by using PAUP 3.1.1 software. For the S segment tree, boostrap values resulting from 100 rep

Figure. Phylogeny of hantaviruses and their relationships to natural reservoirs. The trees were constructed by comparing the complete coding regions of the S segments of hantaviruses or of 330 nucleotides corresponding to those of the M segment of Hantaan virus (strain 76118) from nucleotides 1987 to 2315. Abrreviations for viruses are as in Table 1. For each analysis, a single most parsimonious tree was derived by using PAUP 3.1.1 software. For the S segment tree, boostrap values resulting from 100 replications were all greater than 87% except for the branch leading to BCC (78%) and the branch leading to DOB (52%). The next most common placing of DOB was on a branch with HTN.

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