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Volume 9, Number 3—March 2003

Synopsis

Electron Microscopy for Rapid Diagnosis of Emerging Infectious Agents1

Paul R. Hazelton*Comments to Author  and Hans R. Gelderblom†
Author affiliations: *University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; †Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Germany

Main Article

Figure 3

Three methods for efficient collection of vesicular and blister fluids for diagnostic electron microscopic. A. The contents of a vesicle are collected into the barrel of a needle. B. After the blister is opened, a coated electron microscopic grid is touched to the fluid and air-dried (direct electron microscopic). C. A glass microscope slide is touched directly to an unroofed lesion and a smear prepared. Samples are then placed in rigid containers for transport to the electron microscopic labora

Figure 3. Three methods for efficient collection of vesicular and blister fluids for diagnostic electron microscopic. A. The contents of a vesicle are collected into the barrel of a needle. B. After the blister is opened, a coated electron microscopic grid is touched to the fluid and air-dried (direct electron microscopic). C. A glass microscope slide is touched directly to an unroofed lesion and a smear prepared. Samples are then placed in rigid containers for transport to the electron microscopic laboratory.

Main Article

1Both authors contributed equally to this review.

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