Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 12, Number 8—August 2006

Volume 12, Number 8—August 2006   PDF Version [PDF - 5.37 MB - 131 pages]

Synopses

  • Invasive Enterobacter sakazakii Disease in Infants PDF Version [PDF - 87 KB - 5 pages]
    A. Bowen and C. R. Braden
        View Abstract

    Enterobacter sakazakii kills 40%–80% of infected infants and has been associated with powdered formula. We analyzed 46 cases of invasive infant E. sakazakii infection to define risk factors and guide prevention and treatment. Twelve infants had bacteremia, 33 had meningitis, and 1 had a urinary tract infection. Compared with infants with isolated bacteremia, infants with meningitis had greater birthweight (2,454 g vs. 850 g, p = 0.002) and gestational age (37 weeks vs. 27.8 weeks, p = 0.02), and infection developed at a younger age (6 days vs. 35 days, p<0.001). Among meningitis patients, 11 (33%) had seizures, 7 (21%) had brain abscess, and 14 (42%) died. Twenty-four (92%) of 26 infants with feeding patterns specified were fed powdered formula. Formula samples associated with 15 (68%) of 22 cases yielded E. sakazakii; in 13 cases, clinical and formula strains were indistinguishable. Further clarification of clinical risk factors and improved powdered formula safety is needed.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bowen A, Braden CR. Invasive Enterobacter sakazakii Disease in Infants. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1185-1189. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051509
    AMA Bowen A, Braden CR. Invasive Enterobacter sakazakii Disease in Infants. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1185-1189. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051509.
    APA Bowen, A., & Braden, C. R. (2006). Invasive Enterobacter sakazakii Disease in Infants. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1185-1189. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051509.

Research

  • Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Transmission and Effect on Pathogenesis PDF Version [PDF - 233 KB - 7 pages]
    D. R. Smith et al.
        View Abstract

    Quantifying the dose of an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes is essential for designing pathogenesis studies simulating natural infection of vertebrates. Titration of saliva collected in vitro from infected mosquitoes may not accurately estimate titers transmitted during blood feeding, and infection by needle injection may affect vertebrate pathogenesis. We compared the amount of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus collected from the saliva of Aedes taeniorhynchus to the amount injected into a mouse during blood feeding. Less virus was transmitted by mosquitoes in vivo (geometric mean 11 PFU) than was found for comparable times of salivation in vitro (mean saliva titer 74 PFU). We also observed slightly lower early and late viremia titers in mice that were needle injected with 8 PFU, which represents the low end of the in vivo transmission range. No differences in survival were detected, regardless of the dose or infection route.

        Cite This Article
    EID Smith DR, Aguilar PV, Coffey LL, Gromowski GD, Wang E, Weaver SC, et al. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Transmission and Effect on Pathogenesis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1190-1196. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050841
    AMA Smith DR, Aguilar PV, Coffey LL, et al. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Transmission and Effect on Pathogenesis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1190-1196. doi:10.3201/eid1208.050841.
    APA Smith, D. R., Aguilar, P. V., Coffey, L. L., Gromowski, G. D., Wang, E., & Weaver, S. C. (2006). Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Transmission and Effect on Pathogenesis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1190-1196. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050841.
  • Bat-transmitted Human Rabies Outbreaks, Brazilian Amazon
    E. da Rosa et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe 2 bat-transmitted outbreaks in remote, rural areas of Portel and Viseu Municipalities, Pará State, northern Brazil. Central nervous system specimens were taken after patients' deaths and underwent immunofluorescent assay and histopathologic examination for rabies antigens; also, specimens were injected intracerebrally into suckling mice in an attempt to isolate the virus. Strains obtained were antigenically and genetically characterized. Twenty-one persons died due to paralytic rabies in the 2 municipalities. Ten rabies virus strains were isolated from human specimens; 2 other cases were diagnosed by histopathologic examination. Isolates were antigenically characterized as Desmodus rotundus variant 3 (AgV3). DNA sequencing of 6 strains showed that they were genetically close to D. rotundus–related strains isolated in Brazil. The genetic results were similar to those obtained by using monoclonal antibodies and support the conclusion that the isolates studied belong to the same rabies cycle, the virus variants found in the vampire bat D. rotundus.

        Cite This Article
    EID da Rosa E, Kotait I, Barbosa T, Carrieri ML, Brandão PE, Pinheiro AS, et al. Bat-transmitted Human Rabies Outbreaks, Brazilian Amazon. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1197-1202. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050929
    AMA da Rosa E, Kotait I, Barbosa T, et al. Bat-transmitted Human Rabies Outbreaks, Brazilian Amazon. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1197-1202. doi:10.3201/eid1208.050929.
    APA da Rosa, E., Kotait, I., Barbosa, T., Carrieri, M. L., Brandão, P. E., Pinheiro, A. S....Vasconcelos, P. (2006). Bat-transmitted Human Rabies Outbreaks, Brazilian Amazon. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1197-1202. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050929.
  • Streptococcus suis Sequence Type 7 Outbreak, Sichuan, China PDF Version [PDF - 192 KB - 6 pages]
    C. Ye et al.
        View Abstract

    An outbreak of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 emerged in the summer of 2005 in Sichuan Province, and sporadic infections occurred in 4 additional provinces of China. In total, 99 S. suis strains were isolated and analyzed in this study: 88 isolates from human patients and 11 from diseased pigs. We defined 98 of 99 isolates as pulse type I by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SmaI-digested chromosomal DNA. Furthermore, multilocus sequence typing classified 97 of 98 members of the pulse type I in the same sequence type (ST), ST-7. Isolates of ST-7 were more toxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells than ST-1 strains. S. suis ST-7, the causative agent, was a single-locus variant of ST-1 with increased virulence. These findings strongly suggest that ST-7 is an emerging, highly virulent S. suis clone that caused the largest S. suis outbreak ever described.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ye C, Zhu X, Jing H, Du H, Segura M, Zheng H, et al. Streptococcus suis Sequence Type 7 Outbreak, Sichuan, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1203-1208. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060232
    AMA Ye C, Zhu X, Jing H, et al. Streptococcus suis Sequence Type 7 Outbreak, Sichuan, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1203-1208. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060232.
    APA Ye, C., Zhu, X., Jing, H., Du, H., Segura, M., Zheng, H....Xu, J. (2006). Streptococcus suis Sequence Type 7 Outbreak, Sichuan, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1203-1208. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060232.
  • Carbapenem Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Not Detected by Automated Susceptibility Testing PDF Version [PDF - 105 KB - 5 pages]
    F. C. Tenover et al.
        View Abstract

    Detecting β-lactamase–mediated carbapenem resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates and other Enterobacteriaceae is an emerging problem. In this study, 15 blaKPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae that showed discrepant results for imipenem and meropenem from 4 New York City hospitals were characterized by isoelectric focusing; broth microdilution (BMD); disk diffusion (DD); and MicroScan, Phoenix, Sensititre, VITEK, and VITEK 2 automated systems. All 15 isolates were either intermediate or resistant to imipenem and meropenem by BMD; 1 was susceptible to imipenem by DD. MicroScan and Phoenix reported 1 (6.7%) and 2 (13.3%) isolates, respectively, as imipenem susceptible. VITEK and VITEK 2 reported 10 (67%) and 5 (33%) isolates, respectively, as imipenem susceptible. By Sensititre, 13 (87%) isolates were susceptible to imipenem, and 12 (80%) were susceptible to meropenem. The VITEK 2 Advanced Expert System changed 2 imipenem MIC results from >16 μg/mL to <2 μg/mL but kept the interpretation as resistant. The recognition of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae continues to challenge automated susceptibility systems.

        Cite This Article
    EID Tenover FC, Kalsi RK, Williams PP, Carey RB, Stocker S, Lonsway D, et al. Carbapenem Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Not Detected by Automated Susceptibility Testing. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1209-1213. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060291
    AMA Tenover FC, Kalsi RK, Williams PP, et al. Carbapenem Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Not Detected by Automated Susceptibility Testing. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1209-1213. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060291.
    APA Tenover, F. C., Kalsi, R. K., Williams, P. P., Carey, R. B., Stocker, S., Lonsway, D....Hanna, B. (2006). Carbapenem Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Not Detected by Automated Susceptibility Testing. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1209-1213. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060291.
  • VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France PDF Version [PDF - 394 KB - 9 pages]
    T. Naas et al.
        View Abstract

    VEB-1 extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii was responsible for an outbreak in hospitals in France. A national alert was triggered in September 2003 when 4 hospitals reported clusters of A. baumannii infection with similar susceptibility profiles. Case definitions and laboratory guidelines were disseminated, and prospective surveillance was implemented; strains were sent to a single laboratory for characterization and typing. From April 2003 through June 2004, 53 hospitals reported 290 cases of A. baumannii infection or colonization; 275 isolates were blaVEB-1-positive and clonally related. Cases were first reported in 5 districts of northern France, then in 10 other districts in 4 regions. Within a region, interhospital spread was associated with patient transfer. In northern France, investigation and control measures led to a reduction of reported cases after January 2004. The national alert enabled early control of new clusters, demonstrating the usefulness of early warning about antimicrobial drug resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Naas T, Coignard B, Carbonne A, Blanckaert K, Bajolet O, Bernet C, et al. VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1214-1222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051547
    AMA Naas T, Coignard B, Carbonne A, et al. VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1214-1222. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051547.
    APA Naas, T., Coignard, B., Carbonne, A., Blanckaert, K., Bajolet, O., Bernet, C....Nordmann, P. (2006). VEB-1 Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase–producing Acinetobacter baumannii, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1214-1222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051547.
  • Macrolide Resistance in Adults with Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia PDF Version [PDF - 177 KB - 8 pages]
    J. P. Metlay et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted a case-control study of adults with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia to identify factors associated with macrolide resistance. Study participants were identified through population-based surveillance in a 5-county region surrounding Philadelphia. Forty-three hospitals contributed 444 patients, who were interviewed by telephone regarding potential risk factors. In multivariable analyses, prior exposure to a macrolide antimicrobial agent (odds ratio [OR] 2.8), prior flu vaccination (OR 2.0), and Hispanic ethnicity (OR 4.1) were independently associated with an increased probability of macrolide resistance, and a history of stroke was independently associated with a decreased probability of macrolide resistance (OR 0.2). Fifty-five percent of patients with macrolide-resistant infections reported no antimicrobial drug exposure in the preceding 6 months. Among patients who reported taking antimicrobial agents in the 6 months preceding infection, failure to complete the course of prescribed drugs was associated with an increased probability of macrolide resistance (OR 3.4).

        Cite This Article
    EID Metlay JP, Fishman NO, Joffe MM, Kallan MJ, Chittams JL, Edelstein PH, et al. Macrolide Resistance in Adults with Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1223-1230. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060017
    AMA Metlay JP, Fishman NO, Joffe MM, et al. Macrolide Resistance in Adults with Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1223-1230. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060017.
    APA Metlay, J. P., Fishman, N. O., Joffe, M. M., Kallan, M. J., Chittams, J. L., & Edelstein, P. H. (2006). Macrolide Resistance in Adults with Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1223-1230. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060017.
  • Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii PDF Version [PDF - 228 KB - 8 pages]
    K. R. Daly et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted a prospective pilot study of the serologic responses to overlapping recombinant fragments of the Pneumocystis jirovecii major surface glycoprotein (Msg) in HIV-infected patients with pneumonia due to P. jirovecii and other causes. Similar baseline geometric mean antibody levels to the fragments measured by an ELISA were found in both groups. Serum antibodies to MsgC in P. jirovecii patients rose to a peak level 3–4 weeks (p<0.001) after recovery from pneumocystosis; baseline CD4+ count >50 cells/μL and first episode of pneumocystosis were the principal host factors associated with this rise (both p<0.001). Thus, MsgC shows promise as a serologic reagent and should be tested further in clinical and epidemiologic studies.

        Cite This Article
    EID Daly KR, Huang L, Morris A, Koch J, Crothers K, Levin L, et al. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1231-1237. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060230
    AMA Daly KR, Huang L, Morris A, et al. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1231-1237. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060230.
    APA Daly, K. R., Huang, L., Morris, A., Koch, J., Crothers, K., Levin, L....Walzer, P. D. (2006). Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1231-1237. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060230.

Policy Review

  • Virulent Epidemics and Scope of Healthcare Workers' Duty of Care PDF Version [PDF - 132 KB - 4 pages]
    D. K. Sokol
        View Abstract

    The phrase "duty of care" is, at best, too vague and, at worst, ethically dangerous. The nature and scope of the duty need to be determined, and conflicting duties must be recognized and acknowledged. Duty of care is neither fixed nor absolute but heavily dependent on context. The normal risk level of the working environment, the healthcare worker's specialty, the likely harm and benefits of treatment, and the competing obligations deriving from the worker's multiple roles will all influence the limits of the duty of care. As experts anticipate the arrival of an avian influenza pandemic in humans, discussion of this matter is urgently needed.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sokol DK. Virulent Epidemics and Scope of Healthcare Workers' Duty of Care. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1238-1241. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060360
    AMA Sokol DK. Virulent Epidemics and Scope of Healthcare Workers' Duty of Care. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1238-1241. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060360.
    APA Sokol, D. K. (2006). Virulent Epidemics and Scope of Healthcare Workers' Duty of Care. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1238-1241. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060360.

Dispatches

  • Human and Canine Pulmonary Blastomycosis, North Carolina, 2001–2002 PDF Version [PDF - 182 KB - 3 pages]
    P. MacDonald et al.
        View Abstract

    We investigated a cluster of blastomycosis in 8 humans and 4 dogs in a rural North Carolina community. Delayed diagnosis, difficulty isolating Blastomyces dermatitidis in nature, and lack of a sensitive and specific test to assess exposure make outbreaks of this disease difficult to study.

        Cite This Article
    EID MacDonald P, Langley RL, Gerkin SR, Torok MR, MacCormack J. Human and Canine Pulmonary Blastomycosis, North Carolina, 2001–2002. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1242-1244. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050781
    AMA MacDonald P, Langley RL, Gerkin SR, et al. Human and Canine Pulmonary Blastomycosis, North Carolina, 2001–2002. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1242-1244. doi:10.3201/eid1208.050781.
    APA MacDonald, P., Langley, R. L., Gerkin, S. R., Torok, M. R., & MacCormack, J. (2006). Human and Canine Pulmonary Blastomycosis, North Carolina, 2001–2002. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1242-1244. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050781.
  • West Nile Virus Epizootiology, Central Red River Valley, North Dakota and Minnesota, 2002–2005 PDF Version [PDF - 74 KB - 3 pages]
    J. A. Bell et al.
        View Abstract

    West Nile virus (WNV) epizootiology was monitored from 2002 through 2005 in the area surrounding Grand Forks, North Dakota. Mosquitoes were tested for infection, and birds were surveyed for antibodies. In 2003, WNV was epidemic; in 2004, cool temperatures precluded WNV amplification; and in 2005, immunity in passerines decreased, but did not preclude, WNV amplification.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bell JA, Brewer CM, Mickelson NJ, Garman GW, Vaughan JA. West Nile Virus Epizootiology, Central Red River Valley, North Dakota and Minnesota, 2002–2005. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1245-1247. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060129
    AMA Bell JA, Brewer CM, Mickelson NJ, et al. West Nile Virus Epizootiology, Central Red River Valley, North Dakota and Minnesota, 2002–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1245-1247. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060129.
    APA Bell, J. A., Brewer, C. M., Mickelson, N. J., Garman, G. W., & Vaughan, J. A. (2006). West Nile Virus Epizootiology, Central Red River Valley, North Dakota and Minnesota, 2002–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1245-1247. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060129.
  • O'nyong-nyong Virus, Chad PDF Version [PDF - 125 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Bessaud et al.
        View Abstract

    We report the first laboratory-confirmed human infection with O'nyong-nyong virus in Chad. This virus was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a patient with evidence of a seroconversion to a virus related to Chikungunya virus. Genome sequence was partly determined, and phylogenetic studies were conducted.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bessaud M, Peyrefitte CN, Pastorino B, Gravier P, Tock F, Boete F, et al. O'nyong-nyong Virus, Chad. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1248-1250. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060199
    AMA Bessaud M, Peyrefitte CN, Pastorino B, et al. O'nyong-nyong Virus, Chad. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1248-1250. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060199.
    APA Bessaud, M., Peyrefitte, C. N., Pastorino, B., Gravier, P., Tock, F., Boete, F....Grandadam, M. (2006). O'nyong-nyong Virus, Chad. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1248-1250. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060199.
  • Human Bocavirus in French Children PDF Version [PDF - 86 KB - 3 pages]
    V. Foulongne et al.
        View Abstract

    Human bocavirus (HBoV), a new member of the genus Bocavirus in the family Parvoviridae, has been recently associated with respiratory tract infections. We report the epidemiologic and clinical features observed from a 1-year retrospective study of HBoV infection in young children hospitalized with a respiratory tract infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Foulongne V, Olejnik Y, Perez V, Elaerts S, Rodière M, Segondy M, et al. Human Bocavirus in French Children. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1251-1253. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060213
    AMA Foulongne V, Olejnik Y, Perez V, et al. Human Bocavirus in French Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1251-1253. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060213.
    APA Foulongne, V., Olejnik, Y., Perez, V., Elaerts, S., Rodière, M., & Segondy, M. (2006). Human Bocavirus in French Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1251-1253. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060213.
  • Bocavirus Infection in Hospitalized Children, South Korea PDF Version [PDF - 207 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Chung et al.
        View Abstract

    This study presents the first evidence of human bocavirus infection in South Korean children. The virus was detected in 27 (8.0%) of 336 tested specimens, including 17 (7.5%) of 225 virus-negative specimens, collected from children with acute lower respiratory tract infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Chung J, Han T, Kim C, Kim S. Bocavirus Infection in Hospitalized Children, South Korea. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1254-1256. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060261
    AMA Chung J, Han T, Kim C, et al. Bocavirus Infection in Hospitalized Children, South Korea. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1254-1256. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060261.
    APA Chung, J., Han, T., Kim, C., & Kim, S. (2006). Bocavirus Infection in Hospitalized Children, South Korea. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1254-1256. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060261.
  • Changing Pattern of Visceral Leishmaniasis, United Kingdom, 1985-2004 PDF Version [PDF - 95 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Malik et al.
        View Abstract

    A 20-year (1985–2004) retrospective review of 39 patients with imported visceral leishmaniasis found that tourism to Mediterranean countries and HIV infection were associated with visceral leishmaniasis. Diagnosis was often delayed. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B has improved prognosis. Visceral leishmaniasis should be made a reportable disease.

        Cite This Article
    EID Malik A, John L, Bryceson A, Lockwood D. Changing Pattern of Visceral Leishmaniasis, United Kingdom, 1985-2004. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1257-1259. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050486
    AMA Malik A, John L, Bryceson A, et al. Changing Pattern of Visceral Leishmaniasis, United Kingdom, 1985-2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1257-1259. doi:10.3201/eid1208.050486.
    APA Malik, A., John, L., Bryceson, A., & Lockwood, D. (2006). Changing Pattern of Visceral Leishmaniasis, United Kingdom, 1985-2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1257-1259. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050486.
  • Mental Status after West Nile Virus Infection PDF Version [PDF - 121 KB - 3 pages]
    K. Y. Haaland et al.
        View Abstract

    Mental status after acute West Nile virus infection has not been examined objectively. We compared Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status scores of 116 patients with West Nile fever or West Nile neuroinvasive disease. Mental status was poorer and cognitive complaints more frequent with West Nile neuroinvasive disease (p = 0.005).

        Cite This Article
    EID Haaland KY, Sadek J, Pergam SA, Echevarria LA, Davis LE, Goade D, et al. Mental Status after West Nile Virus Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1260-1262. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060097
    AMA Haaland KY, Sadek J, Pergam SA, et al. Mental Status after West Nile Virus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1260-1262. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060097.
    APA Haaland, K. Y., Sadek, J., Pergam, S. A., Echevarria, L. A., Davis, L. E., Goade, D....Ettestad, P. (2006). Mental Status after West Nile Virus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1260-1262. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060097.
  • Human Metapneumovirus, Australia, 2001–2004 PDF Version [PDF - 212 KB - 4 pages]
    T. P. Sloots et al.
        View Abstract

    We examined 10,025 respiratory samples collected for 4 years (2001–2004) and found a 7.1% average annual incidence of human metapneumovirus. The epidemic peak of infection was late winter to spring, and genotyping showed a change in predominant viral genotype in 3 of the 4 years.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sloots TP, Mackay IM, Bialasiewicz S, Jacob KC, McQueen E, Harnett GB, et al. Human Metapneumovirus, Australia, 2001–2004. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1263-1266. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051239
    AMA Sloots TP, Mackay IM, Bialasiewicz S, et al. Human Metapneumovirus, Australia, 2001–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1263-1266. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051239.
    APA Sloots, T. P., Mackay, I. M., Bialasiewicz, S., Jacob, K. C., McQueen, E., Harnett, G. B....Nissen, M. D. (2006). Human Metapneumovirus, Australia, 2001–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1263-1266. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051239.
  • Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Children, Taiwan PDF Version [PDF - 115 KB - 4 pages]
    W. Lo et al.
        View Abstract

    Highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is common worldwide. Using antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, exotoxin profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing, we provide evidence that supports the relationship between nasal strains of PVL-positive MRSA and community-acquired disease.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lo W, Lin W, Tseng M, Wang S, Chu M, Wang C, et al. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Children, Taiwan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1267-1270. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051570
    AMA Lo W, Lin W, Tseng M, et al. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Children, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1267-1270. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051570.
    APA Lo, W., Lin, W., Tseng, M., Wang, S., Chu, M., & Wang, C. (2006). Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Children, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1267-1270. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051570.
  • Incubation Period of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome PDF Version [PDF - 184 KB - 3 pages]
    P. A. Vial et al.
        View Abstract

    The potential incubation period from exposure to onset of symptoms was 7–39 days (median 18 days) in 20 patients with a defined period of exposure to Andes virus in a high-risk area. This period was 14–32 days (median 18 days) in 11 patients with exposure for <48 hours.

        Cite This Article
    EID Vial PA, Valdivieso F, Mertz G, Castillo C, Belmar E, Delgado I, et al. Incubation Period of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1271-1273. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051127
    AMA Vial PA, Valdivieso F, Mertz G, et al. Incubation Period of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1271-1273. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051127.
    APA Vial, P. A., Valdivieso, F., Mertz, G., Castillo, C., Belmar, E., Delgado, I....Ferrés, M. (2006). Incubation Period of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1271-1273. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051127.
  • Bat-associated Rabies Virus in Skunks PDF Version [PDF - 187 KB - 4 pages]
    M. J. Leslie et al.
        View Abstract

    Rabies was undetected in terrestrial wildlife of northern Arizona until 2001, when rabies was diagnosed in 19 rabid skunks in Flagstaff. Laboratory analyses showed causative rabies viruses associated with bats, which indicated cross-species transmission of unprecedented magnitude. Public health infrastructure must be maintained to address emerging zoonotic diseases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Leslie MJ, Messenger S, Rohde RE, Smith J, Cheshier R, Hanlon C, et al. Bat-associated Rabies Virus in Skunks. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1274-1277. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051526
    AMA Leslie MJ, Messenger S, Rohde RE, et al. Bat-associated Rabies Virus in Skunks. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1274-1277. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051526.
    APA Leslie, M. J., Messenger, S., Rohde, R. E., Smith, J., Cheshier, R., Hanlon, C....Rupprecht, C. E. (2006). Bat-associated Rabies Virus in Skunks. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1274-1277. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051526.
  • Fecal Viral Load and Norovirus-associated Gastroenteritis PDF Version [PDF - 88 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Chan et al.
        View Abstract

    We report the median cDNA viral load of norovirus genogroup II is >100-fold higher than that of genogroup I in the fecal specimens of patients with norovirus-associated gastroenteritis. We speculate that increased cDNA viral load accounts for the higher transmissibility of genogroup II strains through the fecal-oral route.

        Cite This Article
    EID Chan M, Sung J, Lam R, Chan P, Lee N, Lai R, et al. Fecal Viral Load and Norovirus-associated Gastroenteritis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1278-1280. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060081
    AMA Chan M, Sung J, Lam R, et al. Fecal Viral Load and Norovirus-associated Gastroenteritis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1278-1280. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060081.
    APA Chan, M., Sung, J., Lam, R., Chan, P., Lee, N., Lai, R....Leung, W. K. (2006). Fecal Viral Load and Norovirus-associated Gastroenteritis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1278-1280. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060081.
  • Rickettsia felis in Xenopsylla cheopis, Java, Indonesia PDF Version [PDF - 74 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Jiang et al.
        View Abstract

    Rickettsia typhi and R. felis, etiologic agents of murine typhus and fleaborne spotted fever, respectively, were detected in Oriental rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from rodents and shrews in Java, Indonesia. We describe the first evidence of R. felis in Indonesia and naturally occurring R. felis in Oriental rat fleas.

        Cite This Article
    EID Jiang J, Soeatmadji DW, Henry KM, Ratiwayanto S, Bangs MJ, Richards A, et al. Rickettsia felis in Xenopsylla cheopis, Java, Indonesia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1281-1283. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060327
    AMA Jiang J, Soeatmadji DW, Henry KM, et al. Rickettsia felis in Xenopsylla cheopis, Java, Indonesia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1281-1283. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060327.
    APA Jiang, J., Soeatmadji, D. W., Henry, K. M., Ratiwayanto, S., Bangs, M. J., & Richards, A. (2006). Rickettsia felis in Xenopsylla cheopis, Java, Indonesia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1281-1283. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060327.
  • Avian Influenza among Waterfowl Hunters and Wildlife Professionals PDF Version [PDF - 92 KB - 3 pages]
    J. S. Gill et al.
        View Abstract

    We report serologic evidence of avian influenza infection in 1 duck hunter and 2 wildlife professionals with extensive histories of wild waterfowl and game bird exposure. Two laboratory methods showed evidence of past infection with influenza A/H11N9, a less common virus strain in wild ducks, in these 3 persons.

        Cite This Article
    EID Gill JS, Webby RJ, Gilchrist M, Gray GC. Avian Influenza among Waterfowl Hunters and Wildlife Professionals. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1284-1286. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060492
    AMA Gill JS, Webby RJ, Gilchrist M, et al. Avian Influenza among Waterfowl Hunters and Wildlife Professionals. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1284-1286. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060492.
    APA Gill, J. S., Webby, R. J., Gilchrist, M., & Gray, G. C. (2006). Avian Influenza among Waterfowl Hunters and Wildlife Professionals. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1284-1286. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060492.
  • OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza PDF Version [PDF - 112 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Edwards
        View Abstract

    OFFLU is the name of the network of avian influenza expertise inaugurated jointly in 2005 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Organisation for Animal Health. Achievements and constraints to date and plans for the future are described.

        Cite This Article
    EID Edwards S. OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1287-1288. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060380
    AMA Edwards S. OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1287-1288. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060380.
    APA Edwards, S. (2006). OFFLU Network on Avian Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1287-1288. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060380.

Another Dimension

  • Grandmother Speaks of the Old Country PDF Version [PDF - 11 KB - 1 page]
    L. Haskins
            Cite This Article
    EID Haskins L. Grandmother Speaks of the Old Country. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1202. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.AD1208
    AMA Haskins L. Grandmother Speaks of the Old Country. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1202. doi:10.3201/eid1208.AD1208.
    APA Haskins, L. (2006). Grandmother Speaks of the Old Country. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1202. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.AD1208.

Letters

  • Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, Italy PDF Version [PDF - 22 KB - 1 page]
    A. Cawthorne et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cawthorne A, Galetta P, Massari M, Dionisi A, Filetici E, Luzzi I, et al. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1289. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050968
    AMA Cawthorne A, Galetta P, Massari M, et al. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1289. doi:10.3201/eid1208.050968.
    APA Cawthorne, A., Galetta, P., Massari, M., Dionisi, A., Filetici, E., & Luzzi, I. (2006). Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1289. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.050968.
  • Echovirus 13 Aseptic Meningitis, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 32 KB - 3 pages]
    C. I. Kmetzsch et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Kmetzsch CI, Balkie E, Monteiro A, Costa EV, dos Santos G, da Silva EE, et al. Echovirus 13 Aseptic Meningitis, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1289-1291. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051317
    AMA Kmetzsch CI, Balkie E, Monteiro A, et al. Echovirus 13 Aseptic Meningitis, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1289-1291. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051317.
    APA Kmetzsch, C. I., Balkie, E., Monteiro, A., Costa, E. V., dos Santos, G., & da Silva, E. E. (2006). Echovirus 13 Aseptic Meningitis, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1289-1291. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051317.
  • Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Group A Streptococcal Infection PDF Version [PDF - 17 KB - 1 page]
    D. M. Aronoff and Z. D. Mulla
            Cite This Article
    EID Aronoff DM, Mulla ZD. Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Group A Streptococcal Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1291-129. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051067
    AMA Aronoff DM, Mulla ZD. Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Group A Streptococcal Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1291-129. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051067.
    APA Aronoff, D. M., & Mulla, Z. D. (2006). Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Group A Streptococcal Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1291-129. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051067.
  • Detecting Clostridium botulinum PDF Version [PDF - 18 KB - 1 page]
    J. Karner and F. Allerberger
            Cite This Article
    EID Karner J, Allerberger F. Detecting Clostridium botulinum. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1292. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051364
    AMA Karner J, Allerberger F. Detecting Clostridium botulinum. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1292. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051364.
    APA Karner, J., & Allerberger, F. (2006). Detecting Clostridium botulinum. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1292. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051364.
  • Echinococcus multilocularis in Dogs, Japan PDF Version [PDF - 47 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Morishima et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Morishima Y, Sugiyama H, Arakawa K, Kawanaka M. Echinococcus multilocularis in Dogs, Japan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1292-1294. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051241
    AMA Morishima Y, Sugiyama H, Arakawa K, et al. Echinococcus multilocularis in Dogs, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1292-1294. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051241.
    APA Morishima, Y., Sugiyama, H., Arakawa, K., & Kawanaka, M. (2006). Echinococcus multilocularis in Dogs, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1292-1294. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051241.
  • New World Hantavirus in Humans, French Guiana PDF Version [PDF - 36 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Matheus et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Matheus S, Meynard J, Rollin PE, Maubert B, Morvan J. New World Hantavirus in Humans, French Guiana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1294-1295. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051619
    AMA Matheus S, Meynard J, Rollin PE, et al. New World Hantavirus in Humans, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1294-1295. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051619.
    APA Matheus, S., Meynard, J., Rollin, P. E., Maubert, B., & Morvan, J. (2006). New World Hantavirus in Humans, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1294-1295. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051619.
  • Qinghai-like H5N1 from Domestic Cats, Northern Iraq PDF Version [PDF - 53 KB - 3 pages]
    S. L. Yingst et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Yingst SL, Saad MD, Felt SA. Qinghai-like H5N1 from Domestic Cats, Northern Iraq. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1295-1297. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060264
    AMA Yingst SL, Saad MD, Felt SA. Qinghai-like H5N1 from Domestic Cats, Northern Iraq. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1295-1297. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060264.
    APA Yingst, S. L., Saad, M. D., & Felt, S. A. (2006). Qinghai-like H5N1 from Domestic Cats, Northern Iraq. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1295-1297. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060264.
  • Classifying Escherichia coli PDF Version [PDF - 50 KB - 3 pages]
    D. M. Girão et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Girão DM, Girão V, Irino K, Gomes TA. Classifying Escherichia coli. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1297-1299. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051654
    AMA Girão DM, Girão V, Irino K, et al. Classifying Escherichia coli. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1297-1299. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051654.
    APA Girão, D. M., Girão, V., Irino, K., & Gomes, T. A. (2006). Classifying Escherichia coli. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1297-1299. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051654.
  • Toscana Virus RNA in Sergentomyia minuta Flies PDF Version [PDF - 79 KB - 2 pages]
    R. Charrel et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Charrel R, Izri A, Temmam S, de Lamballerie X, Parola P. Toscana Virus RNA in Sergentomyia minuta Flies. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1299-1300. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060345
    AMA Charrel R, Izri A, Temmam S, et al. Toscana Virus RNA in Sergentomyia minuta Flies. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1299-1300. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060345.
    APA Charrel, R., Izri, A., Temmam, S., de Lamballerie, X., & Parola, P. (2006). Toscana Virus RNA in Sergentomyia minuta Flies. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1299-1300. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060345.
  • Rat-bite Fever, Canada PDF Version [PDF - 27 KB - 2 pages]
    M. E. Schachter et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Schachter ME, Wilcox L, Rau N, Yamamura D, Brown S, Lee CH, et al. Rat-bite Fever, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1301-1302. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060044
    AMA Schachter ME, Wilcox L, Rau N, et al. Rat-bite Fever, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1301-1302. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060044.
    APA Schachter, M. E., Wilcox, L., Rau, N., Yamamura, D., Brown, S., & Lee, C. H. (2006). Rat-bite Fever, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1301-1302. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060044.
  • Cutaneous Injury and Vibrio vulnificus Infection PDF Version [PDF - 28 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Chung et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chung P, Chuang S, Tsang T, Wai-man L, Yung R, Lo J, et al. Cutaneous Injury and Vibrio vulnificus Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1302-1303. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051495
    AMA Chung P, Chuang S, Tsang T, et al. Cutaneous Injury and Vibrio vulnificus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1302-1303. doi:10.3201/eid1208.051495.
    APA Chung, P., Chuang, S., Tsang, T., Wai-man, L., Yung, R., & Lo, J. (2006). Cutaneous Injury and Vibrio vulnificus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1302-1303. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.051495.
  • Neorickettsia helminthoeca in Dog, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 89 KB - 3 pages]
    S. A. Headley et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Headley SA, Scorpio DG, Barat NC, Vidotto O, Dumler J. Neorickettsia helminthoeca in Dog, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1303-1305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060130
    AMA Headley SA, Scorpio DG, Barat NC, et al. Neorickettsia helminthoeca in Dog, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1303-1305. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060130.
    APA Headley, S. A., Scorpio, D. G., Barat, N. C., Vidotto, O., & Dumler, J. (2006). Neorickettsia helminthoeca in Dog, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1303-1305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060130.

Books and Media

  • Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Animals and Humans, 2nd Edition PDF Version [PDF - 16 KB - 1 page]
    M. V. Palmer
            Cite This Article
    EID Palmer MV. Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Animals and Humans, 2nd Edition. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1306. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060526
    AMA Palmer MV. Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Animals and Humans, 2nd Edition. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1306. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060526.
    APA Palmer, M. V. (2006). Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Animals and Humans, 2nd Edition. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1306. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060526.
  • Evolution of Microbial Pathogens PDF Version [PDF - 21 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Xu
            Cite This Article
    EID Xu J. Evolution of Microbial Pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1306-1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060579
    AMA Xu J. Evolution of Microbial Pathogens. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1306-1307. doi:10.3201/eid1208.060579.
    APA Xu, J. (2006). Evolution of Microbial Pathogens. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1306-1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.060579.

About the Cover

  • Art, Science, and Life’s Enigmas PDF Version [PDF - 60 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. Art, Science, and Life’s Enigmas. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1308-1309. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.AC1208
    AMA Potter P. Art, Science, and Life’s Enigmas. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1308-1309. doi:10.3201/eid1208.AC1208.
    APA Potter, P. (2006). Art, Science, and Life’s Enigmas. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1308-1309. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.AC1208.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: O’nyong-nyong virus PDF Version [PDF - 64 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Etymologia: O’nyong-nyong virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1250. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.ET1208
    AMA Etymologia: O’nyong-nyong virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1250. doi:10.3201/eid1208.ET1208.
    APA (2006). Etymologia: O’nyong-nyong virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1250. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.ET1208.

Conference Summaries

Corrections

  • Correction, Vol. 12, No. 4 PDF Version [PDF - 16 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Correction, Vol. 12, No. 4. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C11208
    AMA Correction, Vol. 12, No. 4. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1305. doi:10.3201/eid1208.C11208.
    APA (2006). Correction, Vol. 12, No. 4. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C11208.
  • Correction: Vol. 12, No. 6 PDF Version [PDF - 12 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Correction: Vol. 12, No. 6. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C21208
    AMA Correction: Vol. 12, No. 6. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1307. doi:10.3201/eid1208.C21208.
    APA (2006). Correction: Vol. 12, No. 6. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C21208.
  • Correction: Vol. 12 No. 7 PDF Version [PDF - 12 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Correction: Vol. 12 No. 7. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C31208
    AMA Correction: Vol. 12 No. 7. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1307. doi:10.3201/eid1208.C31208.
    APA (2006). Correction: Vol. 12 No. 7. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C31208.
  • Correction: Vol. 12, No. 7 PDF Version [PDF - 12 KB - 1 page]
            Cite This Article
    EID Correction: Vol. 12, No. 7. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(8):1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C41208
    AMA Correction: Vol. 12, No. 7. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(8):1307. doi:10.3201/eid1208.C41208.
    APA (2006). Correction: Vol. 12, No. 7. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(8), 1307. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1208.C41208.
TOP