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Volume 17, Number 1—January 2011

Volume 17, Number 1—January 2011   PDF Version [PDF - 5.09 MB - 171 pages]

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Public Health Implications of Cysticercosis Acquired in the United States PDF Version [PDF - 88 KB - 6 pages]
    F. J. Sorvillo et al.
        View Abstract

    Cysticercosis has emerged as a cause of severe neurologic disease in the United States that primarily affects immigrants from Latin America. Moreover, the relevance of cysticercosis as a public health problem has been highlighted by local transmission. We searched the biomedical literature for reports documenting cases of cysticercosis acquired in the United States. A total of 78 cases, principally neurocysticercosis, were reported from 12 states during 1954–2005. A confirmed or presumptive source of infection was identified among household members or close personal contacts of 16 (21%) case-patients. Several factors, including the severe, potentially fatal, nature of cysticercosis; its fecal–oral route of transmission; the considerable economic effect; the availability of a sensitive and specific serologic test for infection by adult Taenia solium tapeworms; and the demonstrated ability to find a probable source of infection among contacts, all provide a compelling rationale for implementation of public health control efforts.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sorvillo FJ, Wilkins PP, Shafir S, Eberhard M. Public Health Implications of Cysticercosis Acquired in the United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):1-6. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101210
    AMA Sorvillo FJ, Wilkins PP, Shafir S, et al. Public Health Implications of Cysticercosis Acquired in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):1-6. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101210.
    APA Sorvillo, F. J., Wilkins, P. P., Shafir, S., & Eberhard, M. (2011). Public Health Implications of Cysticercosis Acquired in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 1-6. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101210.

Research

  • Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Major Pathogens PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 9 pages]
    E. Scallan et al.
    View Summary

    Each year, 31 pathogens caused 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness, resulting in 55,961 hospitalizations and 1,351 deaths.

        View Abstract

    Estimates of foodborne illness can be used to direct food safety policy and interventions. We used data from active and passive surveillance and other sources to estimate that each year 31 major pathogens acquired in the United States caused 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness (90% credible interval [CrI] 6.6–12.7 million), 55,961 hospitalizations (90% CrI 39,534–75,741), and 1,351 deaths (90% CrI 712–2,268). Most (58%) illnesses were caused by norovirus, followed by nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. (11%), Clostridium perfringens (10%), and Campylobacter spp. (9%). Leading causes of hospitalization were nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. (35%), norovirus (26%), Campylobacter spp. (15%), and Toxoplasma gondii (8%). Leading causes of death were nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. (28%), T. gondii (24%), Listeria monocytogenes (19%), and norovirus (11%). These estimates cannot be compared with prior (1999) estimates to assess trends because different methods were used. Additional data and more refined methods can improve future estimates.

        Cite This Article
    EID Scallan E, Hoekstra RM, Angulo FJ, Tauxe RV, Widdowson M, Roy SL, et al. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Major Pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):7-15. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.P11101
    AMA Scallan E, Hoekstra RM, Angulo FJ, et al. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Major Pathogens. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):7-15. doi:10.3201/eid1701.P11101.
    APA Scallan, E., Hoekstra, R. M., Angulo, F. J., Tauxe, R. V., Widdowson, M., Roy, S. L....Griffin, P. M. (2011). Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Major Pathogens. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 7-15. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.P11101.
  • Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Unspecified Agents PDF Version [PDF - 216 KB - 7 pages]
    E. Scallan et al.
    View Summary

    Each year, unspecified agents caused an estimated 38.4 million episodes of illness, resulting in 71,878 hospitalizations and 1,686 deaths.

        View Abstract

    Each year, 31 major known pathogens acquired in the United States caused an estimated 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness. Additional episodes of illness were caused by unspecified agents, including known agents with insufficient data to estimate agent-specific illness, known agents not yet recognized as causing foodborne illness, substances known to be in food but of unproven pathogenicity, and unknown agents. To estimate these additional illnesses, we used data from surveys, hospital records, and death certificates to estimate illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths from acute gastroenteritis and subtracted illnesses caused by known gastroenteritis pathogens. If the proportions acquired by domestic foodborne transmission were similar to those for known gastroenteritis pathogens, then an estimated 38.4 million (90% credible interval [CrI] 19.8–61.2 million) episodes of domestically acquired foodborne illness were caused by unspecified agents, resulting in 71,878 hospitalizations (90% CrI 9,924–157,340) and 1,686 deaths (90% CrI 369–3,338).

        Cite This Article
    EID Scallan E, Griffin PM, Angulo FJ, Tauxe RV, Hoekstra RM. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Unspecified Agents. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):16-22. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.P21101
    AMA Scallan E, Griffin PM, Angulo FJ, et al. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Unspecified Agents. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):16-22. doi:10.3201/eid1701.P21101.
    APA Scallan, E., Griffin, P. M., Angulo, F. J., Tauxe, R. V., & Hoekstra, R. M. (2011). Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States—Unspecified Agents. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 16-22. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.P21101.
  • Completeness of Communicable Disease Reporting, North Carolina, USA, 1995–1997 and 2000–2006 PDF Version [PDF - 181 KB - 7 pages]
    E. E. Sickbert-Bennett et al.
        View Abstract

    Despite widespread use of communicable disease surveillance data to inform public health intervention and control measures, the reporting completeness of the notifiable disease surveillance system remains incompletely assessed. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive study of reporting completeness with an analysis of 53 diseases reported by 8 health care systems across North Carolina, USA, during 1995–1997 and 2000–2006. All patients who were assigned an International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis code for a state-required reportable communicable disease were matched to surveillance records. We used logistic regression techniques to estimate reporting completeness by disease, year, and health care system. The completeness of reporting varied among the health care systems from 2% to 30% and improved over time. Disease-specific reporting completeness proportions ranged from 0% to 82%, but were generally low even for diseases with great public health importance and opportunity for interventions.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sickbert-Bennett EE, Weber DJ, Poole C, MacDonald P, Maillard J. Completeness of Communicable Disease Reporting, North Carolina, USA, 1995–1997 and 2000–2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):23-29. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100660
    AMA Sickbert-Bennett EE, Weber DJ, Poole C, et al. Completeness of Communicable Disease Reporting, North Carolina, USA, 1995–1997 and 2000–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):23-29. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100660.
    APA Sickbert-Bennett, E. E., Weber, D. J., Poole, C., MacDonald, P., & Maillard, J. (2011). Completeness of Communicable Disease Reporting, North Carolina, USA, 1995–1997 and 2000–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 23-29. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100660.
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Hepatitis E Virus Infection without Reactivation in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients, France PDF Version [PDF - 207 KB - 8 pages]
    F. Legrand-Abravanel et al.
        View Abstract

    Infections with hepatitis E virus (HEV) in solid-organ transplant recipients can lead to chronic hepatitis. However, the incidence of de novo HEV infections after transplantation and risk for reactivation in patients with antibodies against HEV before transplantation are unknown. Pretransplant prevalence of these antibodies in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients at Toulouse University Hospital in France was 14.1%. We found no HEV reactivation among patients with antibodies against HEV at the first annual checkup or by measuring liver enzyme activities and HEV RNA. In contrast, we found 34 locally acquired HEV infections among patients with no antibodies against HEV, 47% of whom had a chronic infection, resulting in an incidence of 3.2/100 person-years. Independent risk factors for HEV infection were an age <52 years at transplantation and receiving a liver transplant. Effective prophylactic measures that include those for potential zoonotic infections should reduce the risk for HEV transmission in this population.

        Cite This Article
    EID Legrand-Abravanel F, Kamar N, Sandres-Saune K, Lhomme S, Mansuy J, Muscari F, et al. Hepatitis E Virus Infection without Reactivation in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):30-37. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100527
    AMA Legrand-Abravanel F, Kamar N, Sandres-Saune K, et al. Hepatitis E Virus Infection without Reactivation in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):30-37. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100527.
    APA Legrand-Abravanel, F., Kamar, N., Sandres-Saune, K., Lhomme, S., Mansuy, J., Muscari, F....Izopet, J. (2011). Hepatitis E Virus Infection without Reactivation in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 30-37. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100527.
  • Concurrent Conditions and Human Listeriosis, England, 1999–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 215 KB - 6 pages]
    P. Mook et al.
        View Abstract

    The epidemiology of listeriosis in England and Wales changed during 2001–2008; more patients >60 years of age had bacteremia than in previous years. To investigate these changes, we calculated risk for listeriosis by concurrent condition for non–pregnancy-associated listeriosis cases reported to the national surveillance system in England during 1999–2009. Conditions occurring with L. monocytogenes infection were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, and compared with appropriate hospital episode statistics inpatient denominator data to calculate incidence rates/million consultations. Malignancies (especially of the blood), kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, alcoholism, and age >60 years were associated with an increased risk for listeriosis. Physicians should consider a diagnosis of listeriosis when treating patients who have concurrent conditions. Providing cancer patients, who accounted for one third of cases, with food safety information might help limit additional cases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mook P, O’Brien SJ, Gillespie IA. Concurrent Conditions and Human Listeriosis, England, 1999–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):38-43. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101174
    AMA Mook P, O’Brien SJ, Gillespie IA. Concurrent Conditions and Human Listeriosis, England, 1999–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):38-43. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101174.
    APA Mook, P., O’Brien, S. J., & Gillespie, I. A. (2011). Concurrent Conditions and Human Listeriosis, England, 1999–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 38-43. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101174.
  • Genotyping Rotavirus RNA from Archived Rotavirus-Positive Rapid Test Strips PDF Version [PDF - 195 KB - 5 pages]
    L. M. Shulman et al.
        View Abstract

    Genotyping circulating rotaviruses before and after introduction of rotavirus vaccine is useful for evaluating vaccine-associated changes in genotype distribution. We determined frequency of rotavirus genotypes among 61 rotavirus-positive children hospitalized in Israel during the 2005–06 rotavirus season. Accurate molecular epidemiologic data were recovered from affinity-concentrated rotavirus immobilized in rotavirus-positive bands from air-dried, diagnostic rotavirus rapid test strips (dipstick) stored at room temperature from 1 week to 5 years. G genotypes were identical for 21 paired dipsticks and suspensions, whereas dipsticks or suspensions detected an additional G genotype in 2 samples. RNA sequences from 7 pairs were identical. Phylogenetic analysis suggested previously unreported G2 sublineages and G9 lineages. The ease with which dipsticks can be stored at local facilities and transported to central reference laboratories can reverse increasing difficulties in obtaining geographically representative stool samples and expand surveillance to regions lacking adequate laboratory facilities.

        Cite This Article
    EID Shulman LM, Silberstein I, Alfandari J, Mendelson E. Genotyping Rotavirus RNA from Archived Rotavirus-Positive Rapid Test Strips. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):44-48. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101132
    AMA Shulman LM, Silberstein I, Alfandari J, et al. Genotyping Rotavirus RNA from Archived Rotavirus-Positive Rapid Test Strips. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):44-48. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101132.
    APA Shulman, L. M., Silberstein, I., Alfandari, J., & Mendelson, E. (2011). Genotyping Rotavirus RNA from Archived Rotavirus-Positive Rapid Test Strips. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 44-48. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101132.
  • Seroprevalence of African Swine Fever in Senegal, 2006 PDF Version [PDF - 173 KB - 6 pages]
    E. M. Etter et al.
        View Abstract

    In Senegal, during 2002–2007, 11 outbreaks of African swine fever (ASF) were reported to the World Organisation for Animal Health. Despite this, little was known of the epidemiology of ASF in the country. To determine the prevalence of ASF in Senegal in 2006, we tested serum specimens collected from a sample of pigs in the 3 main pig-farming regions for antibodies to ASF virus using an ELISA. Of 747 serum samples examined, 126 were positive for ASF, suggesting a prevalence of 16.9%. The estimated prevalences within each of the regions (Fatick, Kolda, and Ziguinchor) were 13.3%, 7.8%, and 22.1%, respectively, with statistical evidence to suggest that the prevalence in Ziguinchor was higher than in Fatick or Kolda. This regional difference is considered in relation to different farming systems and illegal trade with neighboring countries where the infection is endemic.

        Cite This Article
    EID Etter EM, Seck I, Grosbois V, Jori F, Blanco E, Vial L, et al. Seroprevalence of African Swine Fever in Senegal, 2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):49-54. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100896
    AMA Etter EM, Seck I, Grosbois V, et al. Seroprevalence of African Swine Fever in Senegal, 2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):49-54. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100896.
    APA Etter, E. M., Seck, I., Grosbois, V., Jori, F., Blanco, E., Vial, L....Roger, F. L. (2011). Seroprevalence of African Swine Fever in Senegal, 2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 49-54. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100896.
  • Molecular Typing of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein in Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies of Small Ruminants, France, 2002–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 326 KB - 9 pages]
    J. Vulin et al.
        View Abstract

    The agent that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) may be infecting small ruminants, which could have serious implications for human health. To distinguish BSE from scrapie and to examine the molecular characteristics of the protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres), we used a specifically designed Western blot method to test isolates from 648 sheep and 53 goats. During 2002–2009, classical non-Nor98 transmissible spongiform encephalopathy had been confirmed among ≈1.7 million small ruminants in France. Five sheep and 2 goats that showed a PrPres pattern consistent with BSE, or with the CH1641 experimental scrapie source, were identified. Later, bioassays confirmed infection by the BSE agent in 1 of the 2 goats. Western blot testing of the 6 other isolates showed an additional C-terminally cleaved PrPres product, with an unglycosylated band at ≈14 kDa, similar to that found in the CH1641 experimental scrapie isolate and different from the BSE isolate.

        Cite This Article
    EID Vulin J, Biacabe A, Cazeau G, Calavas D, Baron T. Molecular Typing of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein in Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies of Small Ruminants, France, 2002–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):55-63. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100891
    AMA Vulin J, Biacabe A, Cazeau G, et al. Molecular Typing of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein in Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies of Small Ruminants, France, 2002–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):55-63. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100891.
    APA Vulin, J., Biacabe, A., Cazeau, G., Calavas, D., & Baron, T. (2011). Molecular Typing of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein in Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies of Small Ruminants, France, 2002–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 55-63. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100891.
  • Endurance, Refuge, and Reemergence of Dengue Virus Type 2, Puerto Rico, 1986–2007 PDF Version [PDF - 744 KB - 8 pages]
    K. L. McElroy et al.
        View Abstract

    To study the evolution of dengue virus (DENV) serotype 2 in Puerto Rico, we examined the genetic composition and diversity of 160 DENV-2 genomes obtained through 22 consecutive years of sampling. A clade replacement took place in 1994–1997 during a period of high incidence of autochthonous DENV-2 and frequent, short-lived reintroductions of foreign DENV-2. This unique clade replacement was complete just before DENV-3 emerged. By temporally and geographically defining DENV-2 lineages, we describe a refuge of this virus through 4 years of low genome diversity. Our analyses may explain the long-term endurance of DENV-2 despite great epidemiologic changes in disease incidence and serotype distribution.

        Cite This Article
    EID McElroy KL, Santiago GA, Lennon NJ, Birren BW, Henn MR, Muñoz-Jordán JL, et al. Endurance, Refuge, and Reemergence of Dengue Virus Type 2, Puerto Rico, 1986–2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):64-71. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100961
    AMA McElroy KL, Santiago GA, Lennon NJ, et al. Endurance, Refuge, and Reemergence of Dengue Virus Type 2, Puerto Rico, 1986–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):64-71. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100961.
    APA McElroy, K. L., Santiago, G. A., Lennon, N. J., Birren, B. W., Henn, M. R., & Muñoz-Jordán, J. L. (2011). Endurance, Refuge, and Reemergence of Dengue Virus Type 2, Puerto Rico, 1986–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 64-71. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100961.

Dispatches

  • Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus in Wild Rodents in Winter, Finland, 2008–2009
    E. Tonteri et al.
        View Abstract

    Rodents might maintain tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in nature through latent persistent infections. During 2 subsequent winters, 2008 and 2009, in Finland, we detected RNA of European and Siberian subtypes of TBEV in Microtus agrestis and Myodes glareolus voles, respectively. Persistence in rodent reservoirs may contribute to virus overwintering.

        Cite This Article
    EID Tonteri E, Jääskeläinen AE, Tikkakoski T, Voutilainen L, Niemimaa J, Henttonen H, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus in Wild Rodents in Winter, Finland, 2008–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):72-75. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100051
    AMA Tonteri E, Jääskeläinen AE, Tikkakoski T, et al. Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus in Wild Rodents in Winter, Finland, 2008–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):72-75. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100051.
    APA Tonteri, E., Jääskeläinen, A. E., Tikkakoski, T., Voutilainen, L., Niemimaa, J., Henttonen, H....Vapalahti, O. (2011). Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus in Wild Rodents in Winter, Finland, 2008–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 72-75. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100051.
  • Serologic Status for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Taiwan
    D. T. Huang et al.
        View Abstract

    We studied preexisting immunity to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in persons in Taiwan. A total of 18 (36%) of 50 elderly adults in Taiwan born before 1935 had protective antibodies against currently circulating pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. Seasonal influenza vaccines induced antibodies that did not protect against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Huang DT, Shao P, Huang K, Lu C, Wang J, Shih S, et al. Serologic Status for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Taiwan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):76-78. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100014
    AMA Huang DT, Shao P, Huang K, et al. Serologic Status for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):76-78. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100014.
    APA Huang, D. T., Shao, P., Huang, K., Lu, C., Wang, J., Shih, S....Huang, L. (2011). Serologic Status for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Taiwan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 76-78. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100014.
  • Serodiagnosis of Primary Infections with Human Parvovirus 4, Finland PDF Version [PDF - 371 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Lahtinen et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine the prevalence of parvovirus 4 infection and its clinical and sociodemographic correlations in Finland, we used virus-like particle–based serodiagnostic procedures (immunoglobulin [Ig] G, IgM, and IgG avidity) and PCR. We found 2 persons with parvovirus 4 primary infection who had mild or asymptomatic clinical features among hepatitis C virus–infected injection drug users.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lahtinen A, Kivelä P, Hedman L, Kumar A, Kantele A, Lappalainen M, et al. Serodiagnosis of Primary Infections with Human Parvovirus 4, Finland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):79-82. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100750
    AMA Lahtinen A, Kivelä P, Hedman L, et al. Serodiagnosis of Primary Infections with Human Parvovirus 4, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):79-82. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100750.
    APA Lahtinen, A., Kivelä, P., Hedman, L., Kumar, A., Kantele, A., Lappalainen, M....Hedman, K. (2011). Serodiagnosis of Primary Infections with Human Parvovirus 4, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 79-82. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100750.
  • Identification of Rickettsial Infections by Using Cutaneous Swab Specimens and PCR PDF Version [PDF - 336 KB - 4 pages]
    Y. Bechah et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine the usefulness of noninvasive cutaneous swab specimens for detecting rickettsiae, we tested skin eschars from 6 guinea pigs and from 9 humans. Specimens from eschars in guinea pigs were positive for rickettsiae as long as lesions were present. Optimal storage temperature for specimens was 4°C for 3 days.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bechah Y, Socolovschi C, Raoult D. Identification of Rickettsial Infections by Using Cutaneous Swab Specimens and PCR. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):83-86. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100854
    AMA Bechah Y, Socolovschi C, Raoult D. Identification of Rickettsial Infections by Using Cutaneous Swab Specimens and PCR. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):83-86. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100854.
    APA Bechah, Y., Socolovschi, C., & Raoult, D. (2011). Identification of Rickettsial Infections by Using Cutaneous Swab Specimens and PCR. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 83-86. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100854.
  • Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak at Camp for Children with Hematologic and Oncologic Conditions PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 3 pages]
    C. Morrison et al.
        View Abstract

    An outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 occurred among campers and staff at a summer camp attended by children with hematologic and oncologic conditions. The overall attack rate was 36% and was highest among children and adolescents (43%), persons with cancer (48%), and persons with sickle cell disease (82%).

        Cite This Article
    EID Morrison C, Maurtua-Neumann P, Myint MT, Drury SS, Bégué RE. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak at Camp for Children with Hematologic and Oncologic Conditions. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):87-89. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.091499
    AMA Morrison C, Maurtua-Neumann P, Myint MT, et al. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak at Camp for Children with Hematologic and Oncologic Conditions. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):87-89. doi:10.3201/eid1701.091499.
    APA Morrison, C., Maurtua-Neumann, P., Myint, M. T., Drury, S. S., & Bégué, R. E. (2011). Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak at Camp for Children with Hematologic and Oncologic Conditions. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 87-89. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.091499.
  • Reducing Baylisascaris procyonis Roundworm Larvae in Raccoon Latrines PDF Version [PDF - 358 KB - 4 pages]
    K. Page et al.
        View Abstract

    Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms, a parasite of raccoons, can infect humans, sometimes fatally. Parasite eggs can remain viable in raccoon latrines for years. To develop a management technique for parasite eggs, we tested anthelmintic baiting. The prevalence of eggs decreased at latrines, and larval infections decreased among intermediate hosts, indicating that baiting is effective.

        Cite This Article
    EID Page K, Beasley JC, Olson ZH, Smyser TJ, Downey M, Kellner KF, et al. Reducing Baylisascaris procyonis Roundworm Larvae in Raccoon Latrines. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):90-93. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100876
    AMA Page K, Beasley JC, Olson ZH, et al. Reducing Baylisascaris procyonis Roundworm Larvae in Raccoon Latrines. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):90-93. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100876.
    APA Page, K., Beasley, J. C., Olson, Z. H., Smyser, T. J., Downey, M., Kellner, K. F....Rhodes, O. E. (2011). Reducing Baylisascaris procyonis Roundworm Larvae in Raccoon Latrines. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 90-93. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100876.
  • Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories PDF Version [PDF - 238 KB - 3 pages]
    R. Kattan et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes, we analyzed isolates from blood cultures of sick children residing in the West Bank before initiation of pneumococcal vaccination. Of 120 serotypes isolated, 50.8%, 73.3%, and 80.8% of the bacteremia cases could have been prevented by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotype 14 was the most drug-resistant serotype isolated.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kattan R, Abu Rayyan A, Zheiman I, Idkeidek S, Baraghithi S, Rishmawi N, et al. Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):94-96. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100886
    AMA Kattan R, Abu Rayyan A, Zheiman I, et al. Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):94-96. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100886.
    APA Kattan, R., Abu Rayyan, A., Zheiman, I., Idkeidek, S., Baraghithi, S., Rishmawi, N....Hindiyeh, M. Y. (2011). Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 94-96. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100886.
  • CTX-M–producing Non-Typhi Salmonella spp. Isolated from Humans, United States PDF Version [PDF - 218 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Sjölund-Karlsson et al.
        View Abstract

    CTX-M–type β-lactamases are increasing among US Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Of 2,165 non-Typhi Salmonella isolates submitted in 2007 to the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System, 100 (4.6%) displayed elevated MICs (>2 mg/L) of ceftriaxone or ceftiofur. Three isolates (serotypes Typhimurium, Concord, and I 4,5,12:i:–) contained blaCTX-M-5, blaCTX-M-15, and blaCTX-M-55/57, respectively.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sjölund-Karlsson M, Howie R, Krueger A, Rickert R, Pecic G, Lupoli K, et al. CTX-M–producing Non-Typhi Salmonella spp. Isolated from Humans, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):97-99. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100511
    AMA Sjölund-Karlsson M, Howie R, Krueger A, et al. CTX-M–producing Non-Typhi Salmonella spp. Isolated from Humans, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):97-99. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100511.
    APA Sjölund-Karlsson, M., Howie, R., Krueger, A., Rickert, R., Pecic, G., Lupoli, K....Whichard, J. M. (2011). CTX-M–producing Non-Typhi Salmonella spp. Isolated from Humans, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 97-99. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100511.
  • Emergence of Rickettsia africae, Oceania PDF Version [PDF - 273 KB - 3 pages]
    C. Eldin et al.
        View Abstract

    We detected Rickettsia africae, the agent of African tick-bite fever (ATBF), by amplification of fragments of gltA, ompA, and ompB genes from 3 specimens of Amblyomma loculosum ticks collected from humans and birds in New Caledonia. Clinicians who treat persons in this region should be on alert for ATBF.

        Cite This Article
    EID Eldin C, Mediannikov O, Davoust B, Cabre O, Barré N, Raoult D, et al. Emergence of Rickettsia africae, Oceania. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):100-102. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101081
    AMA Eldin C, Mediannikov O, Davoust B, et al. Emergence of Rickettsia africae, Oceania. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):100-102. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101081.
    APA Eldin, C., Mediannikov, O., Davoust, B., Cabre, O., Barré, N., Raoult, D....Parola, P. (2011). Emergence of Rickettsia africae, Oceania. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 100-102. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101081.
  • New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, Canada PDF Version [PDF - 240 KB - 4 pages]
    M. R. Mulvey et al.
        View Abstract

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli isolates harboring New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) were isolated from a patient who had returned to Canada from India. The NDM-1 gene was found on closely related incompatibility group A/C type plasmids. The occurrence of NDM-1 in North America is a major public health concern.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mulvey MR, Grant JM, Plewes K, Roscoe D, Boyd DA. New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):103-106. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101358
    AMA Mulvey MR, Grant JM, Plewes K, et al. New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):103-106. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101358.
    APA Mulvey, M. R., Grant, J. M., Plewes, K., Roscoe, D., & Boyd, D. A. (2011). New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 103-106. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101358.
  • Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Infection in Early Pregnancy and Second Trimester Fetal Demise PDF Version [PDF - 321 KB - 3 pages]
    R. W. Lieberman et al.
        View Abstract

    A second trimester fetal demise followed influenza-like illness in early pregnancy. Influenza A virus (H1N1) was identified in maternal and fetal tissue, confirming transplacental passage. These findings suggested a causal relationship between early exposure and fetal demise. Management of future influenza outbreaks should include evaluation of products of conception associated with fetal loss.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lieberman RW, Bagdasarian N, Thomas D, Van De Ven C. Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Infection in Early Pregnancy and Second Trimester Fetal Demise. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):107-109. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.091895
    AMA Lieberman RW, Bagdasarian N, Thomas D, et al. Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Infection in Early Pregnancy and Second Trimester Fetal Demise. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):107-109. doi:10.3201/eid1701.091895.
    APA Lieberman, R. W., Bagdasarian, N., Thomas, D., & Van De Ven, C. (2011). Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Infection in Early Pregnancy and Second Trimester Fetal Demise. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 107-109. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.091895.
  • Possible Interruption of Measles Virus Transmission, Uganda, 2006–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 386 KB - 4 pages]
    F. N. Baliraine et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine what measles virus genotype(s) circulated in Uganda after strategic interventions aimed at controlling/eliminating measles, we examined samples obtained during 2006–2009 and found only genotype B3.1, which had not been previously detected. Kenya was the likely source, but other countries cannot be excluded.

        Cite This Article
    EID Baliraine FN, Bwogi J, Bukenya H, Seguya R, Kabaliisa T, Kisakye A, et al. Possible Interruption of Measles Virus Transmission, Uganda, 2006–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):110-113. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100753
    AMA Baliraine FN, Bwogi J, Bukenya H, et al. Possible Interruption of Measles Virus Transmission, Uganda, 2006–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):110-113. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100753.
    APA Baliraine, F. N., Bwogi, J., Bukenya, H., Seguya, R., Kabaliisa, T., Kisakye, A....Smit, S. B. (2011). Possible Interruption of Measles Virus Transmission, Uganda, 2006–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 110-113. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100753.
  • Babesiosis in Immunocompetent Patients, Europe PDF Version [PDF - 229 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Martinot et al.
        View Abstract

    We report 2 cases of babesiosis in immunocompetent patients in France. A severe influenza-like disease developed in both patients 2 weeks after they had been bitten by ticks. Diagnosis was obtained from blood smears, and Babesia divergens was identified by PCR in 1 case. Babesiosis in Europe occurs in healthy patients, not only in splenectomized patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Martinot M, Zadeh MM, Hansmann Y, Grawey I, Christmann D, Aguillon S, et al. Babesiosis in Immunocompetent Patients, Europe. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):114-116. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100737
    AMA Martinot M, Zadeh MM, Hansmann Y, et al. Babesiosis in Immunocompetent Patients, Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):114-116. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100737.
    APA Martinot, M., Zadeh, M. M., Hansmann, Y., Grawey, I., Christmann, D., Aguillon, S....De Briel, D. (2011). Babesiosis in Immunocompetent Patients, Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 114-116. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100737.
  • Echinostoma revolutum Infection in Children, Pursat Province, Cambodia PDF Version [PDF - 258 KB - 3 pages]
    W. Sohn et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine the prevalence of helminthic infections in Pursat Province, Cambodia, we tested fecal specimens from 471 children, 10–14 years of age, in June 2007. The prevalence of infection with echinostome flukes ranged from 7.5% to 22.4% in 4 schools surveyed. Adult worms were identified as Echinostoma revolutum.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sohn W, Chai J, Yong T, Eom KS, Yoon C, Sinuon M, et al. Echinostoma revolutum Infection in Children, Pursat Province, Cambodia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):117-119. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100920
    AMA Sohn W, Chai J, Yong T, et al. Echinostoma revolutum Infection in Children, Pursat Province, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):117-119. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100920.
    APA Sohn, W., Chai, J., Yong, T., Eom, K. S., Yoon, C., Sinuon, M....Lee, S. (2011). Echinostoma revolutum Infection in Children, Pursat Province, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 117-119. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100920.
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae in Urinary Tracts of Children with Chronic Kidney Disease PDF Version [PDF - 190 KB - 3 pages]
    I. Burckhardt and S. Zimmermann
        View Abstract

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is not commonly considered an agent of urinary tract infections. We report 3 children with urinary tract abnormalities who had high numbers of S. pneumoniae in their urine (>104 CFU/mL) and varying clinical symptoms.

        Cite This Article
    EID Burckhardt I, Zimmermann S. Streptococcus pneumoniae in Urinary Tracts of Children with Chronic Kidney Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):120-122. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100895
    AMA Burckhardt I, Zimmermann S. Streptococcus pneumoniae in Urinary Tracts of Children with Chronic Kidney Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):120-122. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100895.
    APA Burckhardt, I., & Zimmermann, S. (2011). Streptococcus pneumoniae in Urinary Tracts of Children with Chronic Kidney Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 120-122. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100895.
  • Foreign Travel and Decreased Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Infections PDF Version [PDF - 214 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Al-Mashhadani et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance patterns, we characterized nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica strains isolated in Liverpool, UK, January 2003 through December 2009. Decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was found in 103 (20.9%) of 492 isolates. The lower susceptibility was associated with ciprofloxacin treatment failures and with particular serovars and phage types often acquired during foreign travel.

        Cite This Article
    EID Al-Mashhadani M, Hewson R, Vivancos R, Keenan A, Beeching NJ, Wain J, et al. Foreign Travel and Decreased Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Infections. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):123-125. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100999
    AMA Al-Mashhadani M, Hewson R, Vivancos R, et al. Foreign Travel and Decreased Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):123-125. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100999.
    APA Al-Mashhadani, M., Hewson, R., Vivancos, R., Keenan, A., Beeching, N. J., Wain, J....Parry, C. M. (2011). Foreign Travel and Decreased Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 123-125. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100999.

Commentaries

  • How Safe Is Our Food? PDF Version [PDF - 228 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Morris
            Cite This Article
    EID Morris J. How Safe Is Our Food?. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):126-128. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101821
    AMA Morris J. How Safe Is Our Food?. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):126-128. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101821.
    APA Morris, J. (2011). How Safe Is Our Food?. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 126-128. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101821.

Letters

  • Emergence of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase, Austria PDF Version [PDF - 179 KB - 2 pages]
    G. Zarfel et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Zarfel G, Hoenigl M, Leitner E, Salzer H, Feierl G, Masoud L, et al. Emergence of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase, Austria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):129-130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101331
    AMA Zarfel G, Hoenigl M, Leitner E, et al. Emergence of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase, Austria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):129-130. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101331.
    APA Zarfel, G., Hoenigl, M., Leitner, E., Salzer, H., Feierl, G., Masoud, L....Grisold, A. J. (2011). Emergence of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase, Austria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 129-130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101331.
  • Carbapenemases in Enterobacteria, Hong Kong, China, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 207 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Chu et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chu Y, Tung VW, Cheung TK, Chu M, Cheng N, Lai C, et al. Carbapenemases in Enterobacteria, Hong Kong, China, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):130-132. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101443
    AMA Chu Y, Tung VW, Cheung TK, et al. Carbapenemases in Enterobacteria, Hong Kong, China, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):130-132. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101443.
    APA Chu, Y., Tung, V. W., Cheung, T. K., Chu, M., Cheng, N., Lai, C....Lo, J. Y. (2011). Carbapenemases in Enterobacteria, Hong Kong, China, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 130-132. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101443.
  • Change in Age Pattern of Persons with Dengue, Northeastern Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 177 KB - 3 pages]
    L. P. Cavalcanti et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cavalcanti LP, Vilar D, Souza-Santos R, Teixeira MG. Change in Age Pattern of Persons with Dengue, Northeastern Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):132-134. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100321
    AMA Cavalcanti LP, Vilar D, Souza-Santos R, et al. Change in Age Pattern of Persons with Dengue, Northeastern Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):132-134. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100321.
    APA Cavalcanti, L. P., Vilar, D., Souza-Santos, R., & Teixeira, M. G. (2011). Change in Age Pattern of Persons with Dengue, Northeastern Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 132-134. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100321.
  • Apophysomyces variabilis Infections in Humans PDF Version [PDF - 177 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Guarro et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Guarro J, Chander J, Alvarez E, Stchigel AM, Robin K, Dalal U, et al. Apophysomyces variabilis Infections in Humans. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):134-135. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101139
    AMA Guarro J, Chander J, Alvarez E, et al. Apophysomyces variabilis Infections in Humans. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):134-135. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101139.
    APA Guarro, J., Chander, J., Alvarez, E., Stchigel, A. M., Robin, K., Dalal, U....Cano, J. F. (2011). Apophysomyces variabilis Infections in Humans. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 134-135. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101139.
  • Fatal Vibrio vulnificus Infection Associated with Eating Raw Oysters, New Caledonia PDF Version [PDF - 183 KB - 2 pages]
    C. Cazorla et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cazorla C, Guigon A, Noel M, Quilici M, Lacassin F. Fatal Vibrio vulnificus Infection Associated with Eating Raw Oysters, New Caledonia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):136-137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100603
    AMA Cazorla C, Guigon A, Noel M, et al. Fatal Vibrio vulnificus Infection Associated with Eating Raw Oysters, New Caledonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):136-137. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100603.
    APA Cazorla, C., Guigon, A., Noel, M., Quilici, M., & Lacassin, F. (2011). Fatal Vibrio vulnificus Infection Associated with Eating Raw Oysters, New Caledonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 136-137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100603.
  • Empyema caused by MRSA ST398 with Atypical Resistance Profile, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 187 KB - 3 pages]
    C. Lozano et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lozano C, Aspiroz C, Ezpeleta AI, Gómez-Sanz E, Zarazaga M, Torres C, et al. Empyema caused by MRSA ST398 with Atypical Resistance Profile, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):138-140. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100307
    AMA Lozano C, Aspiroz C, Ezpeleta AI, et al. Empyema caused by MRSA ST398 with Atypical Resistance Profile, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):138-140. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100307.
    APA Lozano, C., Aspiroz, C., Ezpeleta, A. I., Gómez-Sanz, E., Zarazaga, M., & Torres, C. (2011). Empyema caused by MRSA ST398 with Atypical Resistance Profile, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 138-140. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100307.
  • Intensive Care Unit Admission for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Reunion Island, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 166 KB - 2 pages]
    B. Gaüzère et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Gaüzère B, Malvy D, Filleul L, Ramful D, Jaffar-Bandjee M, El Bock M, et al. Intensive Care Unit Admission for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Reunion Island, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):140-141. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100467
    AMA Gaüzère B, Malvy D, Filleul L, et al. Intensive Care Unit Admission for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Reunion Island, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):140-141. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100467.
    APA Gaüzère, B., Malvy, D., Filleul, L., Ramful, D., Jaffar-Bandjee, M., El Bock, M....Vandroux, D. (2011). Intensive Care Unit Admission for Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Reunion Island, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 140-141. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100467.
  • Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Northeastern Greece PDF Version [PDF - 233 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Papa et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Papa A, Tzala E, Maltezou HC. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Northeastern Greece. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):141-143. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100073
    AMA Papa A, Tzala E, Maltezou HC. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Northeastern Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):141-143. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100073.
    APA Papa, A., Tzala, E., & Maltezou, H. C. (2011). Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Northeastern Greece. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 141-143. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100073.
  • Class D OXA-48 Carbapenemase in Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteria, Senegal PDF Version [PDF - 192 KB - 2 pages]
    O. Moquet et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Moquet O, Bouchiat C, Kinana A, Seck A, Arouna O, Bercion R, et al. Class D OXA-48 Carbapenemase in Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteria, Senegal. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):143-144. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100244
    AMA Moquet O, Bouchiat C, Kinana A, et al. Class D OXA-48 Carbapenemase in Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteria, Senegal. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):143-144. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100244.
    APA Moquet, O., Bouchiat, C., Kinana, A., Seck, A., Arouna, O., Bercion, R....Garin, B. (2011). Class D OXA-48 Carbapenemase in Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteria, Senegal. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 143-144. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100244.
  • Identification of Legionella feeleii Cellulitis PDF Version [PDF - 208 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Loridant et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Loridant S, Lagier J, La Scola B. Identification of Legionella feeleii Cellulitis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):145-146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101346
    AMA Loridant S, Lagier J, La Scola B. Identification of Legionella feeleii Cellulitis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):145-146. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101346.
    APA Loridant, S., Lagier, J., & La Scola, B. (2011). Identification of Legionella feeleii Cellulitis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 145-146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101346.
  • Sparganosis, Henan Province, Central China PDF Version [PDF - 193 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Cui et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cui J, Lin XM, Zhang HW, Xu BL, Wang ZQ. Sparganosis, Henan Province, Central China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):146-147. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101095
    AMA Cui J, Lin XM, Zhang HW, et al. Sparganosis, Henan Province, Central China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):146-147. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101095.
    APA Cui, J., Lin, X. M., Zhang, H. W., Xu, B. L., & Wang, Z. Q. (2011). Sparganosis, Henan Province, Central China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 146-147. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101095.
  • Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Japan PDF Version [PDF - 213 KB - 2 pages]
    M. Ohnishi et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ohnishi M, Saika T, Hoshina S, Iwasaku K, Nakayama S, Watanabe H, et al. Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Japan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):148-149. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100397
    AMA Ohnishi M, Saika T, Hoshina S, et al. Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):148-149. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100397.
    APA Ohnishi, M., Saika, T., Hoshina, S., Iwasaku, K., Nakayama, S., Watanabe, H....Kitawaki, J. (2011). Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 148-149. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100397.
  • Role of National Travel Health Network and Centre Website during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 177 KB - 2 pages]
    N. L. Boddington et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Boddington NL, Bryant N, Hill DR. Role of National Travel Health Network and Centre Website during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):149-150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100486
    AMA Boddington NL, Bryant N, Hill DR. Role of National Travel Health Network and Centre Website during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):149-150. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100486.
    APA Boddington, N. L., Bryant, N., & Hill, D. R. (2011). Role of National Travel Health Network and Centre Website during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 149-150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100486.
  • Zoonotic Cryptosporidiosis from Petting Farms, England and Wales, 1992–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 193 KB - 2 pages]
    F. J. Gormley et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Gormley FJ, Little CL, Chalmers RM, Rawal N, Adak GK. Zoonotic Cryptosporidiosis from Petting Farms, England and Wales, 1992–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):151-152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100902
    AMA Gormley FJ, Little CL, Chalmers RM, et al. Zoonotic Cryptosporidiosis from Petting Farms, England and Wales, 1992–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):151-152. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100902.
    APA Gormley, F. J., Little, C. L., Chalmers, R. M., Rawal, N., & Adak, G. K. (2011). Zoonotic Cryptosporidiosis from Petting Farms, England and Wales, 1992–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 151-152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100902.
  • Buruli Ulcer Prevalence and Altitude, Benin PDF Version [PDF - 159 KB - 2 pages]
    G. E. Sopoh et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Sopoh GE, Johnson RC, Anagonou SY, Barogui YT, Dossou AD, Houézo JG, et al. Buruli Ulcer Prevalence and Altitude, Benin. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):153-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100644
    AMA Sopoh GE, Johnson RC, Anagonou SY, et al. Buruli Ulcer Prevalence and Altitude, Benin. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):153-154. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100644.
    APA Sopoh, G. E., Johnson, R. C., Anagonou, S. Y., Barogui, Y. T., Dossou, A. D., Houézo, J. G....Portaels, F. (2011). Buruli Ulcer Prevalence and Altitude, Benin. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 153-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100644.
  • Vibrio cholerae O1 in 2 Coastal Villages, Papua New Guinea PDF Version [PDF - 186 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Rosewell et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Rosewell A, Dagina R, Murhekar M, Ropa B, Posanai E, Dutta SR, et al. Vibrio cholerae O1 in 2 Coastal Villages, Papua New Guinea. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):154-156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100993
    AMA Rosewell A, Dagina R, Murhekar M, et al. Vibrio cholerae O1 in 2 Coastal Villages, Papua New Guinea. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):154-156. doi:10.3201/eid1701.100993.
    APA Rosewell, A., Dagina, R., Murhekar, M., Ropa, B., Posanai, E., Dutta, S. R....MacIntyre, C. (2011). Vibrio cholerae O1 in 2 Coastal Villages, Papua New Guinea. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 154-156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.100993.
  • Clostridium sphenoides Bloodstream Infection in Man PDF Version [PDF - 290 KB - 4 pages]
    T. Kelesidis and S. Tsiodras
            Cite This Article
    EID Kelesidis T, Tsiodras S. Clostridium sphenoides Bloodstream Infection in Man. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):156-159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101029
    AMA Kelesidis T, Tsiodras S. Clostridium sphenoides Bloodstream Infection in Man. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):156-159. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101029.
    APA Kelesidis, T., & Tsiodras, S. (2011). Clostridium sphenoides Bloodstream Infection in Man. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 156-159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101029.

Books and Media

  • Cholera: The Biography PDF Version [PDF - 182 KB - 1 page]
    K. S. Hagen
            Cite This Article
    EID Hagen KS. Cholera: The Biography. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101580
    AMA Hagen KS. Cholera: The Biography. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):159. doi:10.3201/eid1701.101580.
    APA Hagen, K. S. (2011). Cholera: The Biography. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.101580.

About the Cover

  • Manna to Gall PDF Version [PDF - 232 KB - 1 page]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. Manna to Gall. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.AC1701
    AMA Potter P. Manna to Gall. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):160. doi:10.3201/eid1701.AC1701.
    APA Potter, P. (2011). Manna to Gall. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.AC1701.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Vibrio vulnificus PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 1 page]
    N. Männikkö
            Cite This Article
    EID Männikkö N. Etymologia: Vibrio vulnificus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(1):137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.ET1701
    AMA Männikkö N. Etymologia: Vibrio vulnificus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):137. doi:10.3201/eid1701.ET1701.
    APA Männikkö, N. (2011). Etymologia: Vibrio vulnificus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(1), 137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.ET1701.
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