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Volume 13, Number 1—January 2007

Research

Blood Transfusion and Spread of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Klaus Dietz*Comments to Author , Günter Raddatz*, Jonathan Wallis†, Norbert Müller‡, Inga Zerr§, Hans-Peter Duerr*, Hans Lefèvre¶, Erhard Seifried#, and Johannes Löwer**
Author affiliations: *University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; †Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; ‡University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; §University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; ¶DRK Blood Donor Service West, Hagen, Germany; #DRK Blood Donor Service Baden-Württemberg, Hessen, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; **Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Langen, Germany;

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Figure 2

Figure 2 - Absolute prevalence of infection for an incubation period of 16 (A) and 50 (B) years, for nonrecipients of blood transfusion (solid, black), recipients under the assumption of no infectivity (dashed, grey), of 100% infectivity without donor exclusion (dotted, black), and 100% infectivity with donor exclusion (solid, gray). The prevalence declines after the alimentary route of transmission is interrupted, i.e., after 10 years. Prevalence differs only slightly if the infection

Figure 2. Absolute prevalence of infection for an incubation period of 16 (A) and 50 (B) years, for nonrecipients of blood transfusion (solid, black), recipients under the assumption of no infectivity (dashed, grey), of 100% infectivity without donor exclusion (dotted, black), and 100% infectivity with donor exclusion (solid, gray). The prevalence declines after the alimentary route of transmission is interrupted, i.e., after 10 years. Prevalence differs only slightly if the infection probability of a transfusion from an infected donor is increased from 0% to 100%. Donor exclusion produces negligible reductions.

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