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Volume 17, Number 7—July 2011

CME ACTIVITY - Synopsis

Neurognathostomiasis, a Neglected Parasitosis of the Central Nervous System

Juri Katchanov, Kittisak Sawanyawisuth, Verajit Chotmongkol, and Yukifumi NawaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand (J. Katchanov, Y. Nawa); Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand (K. Sawanyawisuth, V. Chotmongkol)

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Figure 2

Images of the brains of patients with cerebral gnathostomiasis. A) Axial T1-weighted image showing small hemorrhage in the right basal ganglia (arrow). B) Sagittal T2-weighted images showing diffuse cord enlargement with longitudinal T2 hyperintensity (arrows). C) Axial T1-weighted image showing a hemorrhagic track in the tegmentum of the pons (arrow). D) Coronal T1-weighted postgadolinium image, showing the longitudinal extension of the same hemorrhagic track as in panel C (arrows). Images from

Figure 2. Images of the brains of patients with cerebral gnathostomiasis. A) Axial T1-weighted image showing small hemorrhage in the right basal ganglia (arrow). B) Sagittal T2-weighted images showing diffuse cord enlargement with longitudinal T2 hyperintensity (arrows). C) Axial T1-weighted image showing a hemorrhagic track in the tegmentum of the pons (arrow). D) Coronal T1-weighted postgadolinium image, showing the longitudinal extension of the same hemorrhagic track as in panel C (arrows). Images from K. Sawanyawisuth et al. (11), used with permission.

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