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Volume 17, Number 7—July 2011

Volume 17, Number 7—July 2011   PDF Version [PDF - 5.59 MB - 191 pages]

Synopses

  • Understanding the Cholera Epidemic, Haiti PDF Version [PDF - 413 KB - 8 pages]
    R. Piarroux et al.
        View Abstract

    After onset of a cholera epidemic in Haiti in mid-October 2010, a team of researchers from France and Haiti implemented field investigations and built a database of daily cases to facilitate identification of communes most affected. Several models were used to identify spatiotemporal clusters, assess relative risk associated with the epidemic’s spread, and investigate causes of its rapid expansion in Artibonite Department. Spatiotemporal analyses highlighted 5 significant clusters (p<0.001): 1 near Mirebalais (October 16–19) next to a United Nations camp with deficient sanitation, 1 along the Artibonite River (October 20–28), and 3 caused by the centrifugal epidemic spread during November. The regression model indicated that cholera more severely affected communes in the coastal plain (risk ratio 4.91) along the Artibonite River downstream of Mirebalais (risk ratio 4.60). Our findings strongly suggest that contamination of the Artibonite and 1 of its tributaries downstream from a military camp triggered the epidemic.

        Cite This Article
    EID Piarroux R, Barrais R, Faucher B, Haus R, Piarroux M, Gaudart J, et al. Understanding the Cholera Epidemic, Haiti. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1161-1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110059
    AMA Piarroux R, Barrais R, Faucher B, et al. Understanding the Cholera Epidemic, Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1161-1168. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110059.
    APA Piarroux, R., Barrais, R., Faucher, B., Haus, R., Piarroux, M., Gaudart, J....Raoult, D. (2011). Understanding the Cholera Epidemic, Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1161-1168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110059.
  • Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Argentina PDF Version [PDF - 264 KB - 4 pages]
    Y. Romer et al.
        View Abstract

    Rickettsia parkeri, a recently identified cause of spotted fever rickettsiosis in the United States, has been found in Amblyomma triste ticks in several countries of South America, including Argentina, where it is believed to cause disease in humans. We describe the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of 2 patients in Argentina with confirmed R. parkeri infection and 7 additional patients with suspected R. parkeri rickettsiosis identified at 1 hospital during 2004–2009. The frequency and character of clinical signs and symptoms among these 9 patients closely resembled those described for patients in the United States (presence of an inoculation eschar, maculopapular rash often associated with pustules or vesicles, infrequent gastrointestinal manifestations, and relatively benign clinical course). Many R. parkeri infections in South America are likely to be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, dengue, or leptospirosis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Romer Y, Seijo AC, Crudo F, Nicholson WL, Varela-Stokes A, Lash RR, et al. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Argentina. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1169-1173. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101857
    AMA Romer Y, Seijo AC, Crudo F, et al. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1169-1173. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101857.
    APA Romer, Y., Seijo, A. C., Crudo, F., Nicholson, W. L., Varela-Stokes, A., Lash, R. R....Paddock, C. D. (2011). Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1169-1173. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101857.
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Neurognathostomiasis, a Neglected Parasitosis of the Central Nervous System PDF Version [PDF - 323 KB - 7 pages]
    J. Katchanov et al.
        View Abstract

    Gnathostomiasis is a foodborne zoonotic helminthic infection caused by the third-stage larvae of Gnathostoma spp. nematodes. The most severe manifestation involves infection of the central nervous system, neurognathostomiasis. Although gnathostomiasis is endemic to Asia and Latin America, almost all neurognathostomiasis cases are reported from Thailand. Despite high rates of illness and death, neurognathostomiasis has received less attention than the more common cutaneous form of gnathostomiasis, possibly because of the apparent geographic confinement of the neurologic infection to 1 country. Recently, however, the disease has been reported in returned travelers in Europe. We reviewed the English-language literature on neurognathostomiasis and analyzed epidemiology and geographic distribution, mode of central nervous system invasion, pathophysiology, clinical features, neuroimaging data, and treatment options. On the basis of epidemiologic data, clinical signs, neuroimaging, and laboratory findings, we propose diagnostic criteria for neurognathostomiasis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Katchanov J, Sawanyawisuth K, Chotmongkol V, Nawa Y. Neurognathostomiasis, a Neglected Parasitosis of the Central Nervous System. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1174-1180. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101433
    AMA Katchanov J, Sawanyawisuth K, Chotmongkol V, et al. Neurognathostomiasis, a Neglected Parasitosis of the Central Nervous System. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1174-1180. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101433.
    APA Katchanov, J., Sawanyawisuth, K., Chotmongkol, V., & Nawa, Y. (2011). Neurognathostomiasis, a Neglected Parasitosis of the Central Nervous System. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1174-1180. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101433.

Research

  • Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010 PDF Version [PDF - 225 KB - 7 pages]
    J. E. Fielding et al.
        View Abstract

    To estimate effectiveness of seasonal trivalent and monovalent influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, we conducted a test-negative case–control study in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. Patients seen for influenza-like illness by general practitioners in a sentinel surveillance network during 2010 were tested for influenza; vaccination status was recorded. Case-patients had positive PCRs for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, and controls had negative influenza test results. Of 319 eligible patients, test results for 139 (44%) were pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positive. Adjusted effectiveness of seasonal vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was 79% (95% confidence interval 33%–93%); effectiveness of monovalent vaccine was 47% and not statistically significant. Vaccine effectiveness was higher among adults. Despite some limitations, this study indicates that the first seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to include the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain provided significant protection against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Fielding JE, Grant KA, Garcia K, Kelly HA. Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1181-1187. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101959
    AMA Fielding JE, Grant KA, Garcia K, et al. Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1181-1187. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101959.
    APA Fielding, J. E., Grant, K. A., Garcia, K., & Kelly, H. A. (2011). Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Australia, 2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1181-1187. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101959.
  • Transmission of Influenza on International Flights, May 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 305 KB - 7 pages]
    A. Foxwell et al.
        View Abstract

    Understanding the dynamics of influenza transmission on international flights is necessary for prioritizing public health response to pandemic incursions. A retrospective cohort study to ascertain in-flight transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza-like illness (ILI) was undertaken for 2 long-haul flights entering Australia during May 2009. Combined results, including survey responses from 319 (43%) of 738 passengers, showed that 13 (2%) had an ILI in flight and an ILI developed in 32 (5%) passengers during the first week post arrival. Passengers were at 3.6% increased risk of contracting pandemic (H1N1) 2009 if they sat in the same row as or within 2 rows of persons who were symptomatic preflight. A closer exposed zone (2 seats in front, 2 seats behind, and 2 seats either side) increased the risk for postflight disease to 7.7%. Efficiency of contact tracing without compromising the effectiveness of the public health intervention might be improved by limiting the exposed zone.

        Cite This Article
    EID Foxwell A, Roberts L, Lokuge K, Kelly PM. Transmission of Influenza on International Flights, May 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1188-1194. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101135
    AMA Foxwell A, Roberts L, Lokuge K, et al. Transmission of Influenza on International Flights, May 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1188-1194. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101135.
    APA Foxwell, A., Roberts, L., Lokuge, K., & Kelly, P. M. (2011). Transmission of Influenza on International Flights, May 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1188-1194. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101135.
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, United States, 1993–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 273 KB - 7 pages]
    A. MacNeil et al.
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    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe respiratory illness identified in 1993. Since its identification, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has obtained standardized information about and maintained a registry of all laboratory-confirmed HPS cases in the United States. During 1993–2009, a total of 510 HPS cases were identified. Case counts have varied from 11 to 48 per year (case-fatality rate 35%). However, there were no trends suggesting increasing or decreasing case counts or fatality rates. Although cases were reported in 30 states, most cases occurred in the western half of the country; annual case counts varied most in the southwestern United States. Increased hematocrits, leukocyte counts, and creatinine levels were more common in HPS case-patients who died. HPS is a severe disease with a high case-fatality rate, and cases continue to occur. The greatest potential for high annual HPS incidence exists in the southwestern United States.

        Cite This Article
    EID MacNeil A, Ksiazek TG, Rollin PE. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, United States, 1993–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1195-1201. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101306
    AMA MacNeil A, Ksiazek TG, Rollin PE. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, United States, 1993–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1195-1201. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101306.
    APA MacNeil, A., Ksiazek, T. G., & Rollin, P. E. (2011). Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, United States, 1993–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1195-1201. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101306.
  • Hansen Disease among Micronesian and Marshallese Persons Living in the United States PDF Version [PDF - 516 KB - 7 pages]
    P. Woodall et al.
        View Abstract

    An increasing proportion of Hansen disease cases in the United States occurs among migrants from the Micronesian region, where leprosy prevalence is high. We abstracted surveillance and clinical records of the National Hansen’s Disease Program to determine geographic, demographic, and clinical patterns. Since 2004, 13% of US cases have occurred in this migrant population. Although Hawaii reported the most cases, reports have increased in the central and southern states. Multibacillary disease in men predominates on the US mainland. Of 49 patients for whom clinical data were available, 37 (75%) had leprosy reaction, neuropathy, or other complications; 17 (37%) of 46 completed treatment. Comparison of data from the US mainland with Hawaii and country-of-origin suggests under-detection of cases in pediatric and female patients and with paucibacillary disease in the United States. Increased case finding and management, and avoidance of leprosy-labeled stigma, is needed for this population.

        Cite This Article
    EID Woodall P, Scollard DM, Rajan L. Hansen Disease among Micronesian and Marshallese Persons Living in the United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1202-1208. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102036
    AMA Woodall P, Scollard DM, Rajan L. Hansen Disease among Micronesian and Marshallese Persons Living in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1202-1208. doi:10.3201/eid1707.102036.
    APA Woodall, P., Scollard, D. M., & Rajan, L. (2011). Hansen Disease among Micronesian and Marshallese Persons Living in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1202-1208. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102036.
  • Epidemiology and Control of Legionellosis, Singapore PDF Version [PDF - 234 KB - 7 pages]
    M. C. Lam et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine trends and clinical and epidemiologic features of legionellosis in Singapore, we studied cases reported during 2000–2009. During this period, 238 indigenous and 33 imported cases of legionellosis were reported. Cases were reported individually and sporadically throughout each year. Although the annual incidence of indigenous cases had decreased from 0.46 cases per 100,000 population in 2003 to 0.16 cases per 100,000 in 2009, the proportion of imported cases increased correspondingly from 6.2% during 2000–2004 to 27.3% during 2005–2009 (p<0.0005). The prevalence of Legionella bacteria in cooling towers and water fountains was stable (range 12.1%–15.3%) during 2004–August 2008.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lam MC, Ang L, Tan AL, James L, Goh K. Epidemiology and Control of Legionellosis, Singapore. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1209-1215. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101509
    AMA Lam MC, Ang L, Tan AL, et al. Epidemiology and Control of Legionellosis, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1209-1215. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101509.
    APA Lam, M. C., Ang, L., Tan, A. L., James, L., & Goh, K. (2011). Epidemiology and Control of Legionellosis, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1209-1215. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101509.
  • Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Genes of Escherichia coli in Chicken Meat and Humans, the Netherlands PDF Version [PDF - 525 KB - 7 pages]
    I. Overdevest et al.
        View Abstract

    We determined the prevalence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes of Enterobacteriaceae in retail chicken meat and humans in the Netherlands. Raw meat samples were obtained, and simultaneous cross-sectional surveys of fecal carriage were performed in 4 hospitals in the same area. Human blood cultures from these hospitals that contained ESBL genes were included. A high prevalence of ESBL genes was found in chicken meat (79.8%). Genetic analysis showed that the predominant ESBL genes in chicken meat and human rectal swab specimens were identical. These genes were also frequently found in human blood culture isolates. Typing results of Escherichia coli strains showed a high degree of similarity with strains from meat and humans. These findings suggest that the abundant presence of ESBL genes in the food chain may have a profound effect on future treatment options for a wide range of infections caused by gram-negative bacteria.

        Cite This Article
    EID Overdevest I, Willemsen I, Rijnsburger M, Eustace A, Xu L, Hawkey PM, et al. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Genes of Escherichia coli in Chicken Meat and Humans, the Netherlands. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1216-1222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110209
    AMA Overdevest I, Willemsen I, Rijnsburger M, et al. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Genes of Escherichia coli in Chicken Meat and Humans, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1216-1222. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110209.
    APA Overdevest, I., Willemsen, I., Rijnsburger, M., Eustace, A., Xu, L., Hawkey, P. M....Kluytmans, J. (2011). Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Genes of Escherichia coli in Chicken Meat and Humans, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1216-1222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110209.
  • Asian Lineage of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus, Africa PDF Version [PDF - 345 KB - 9 pages]
    O. Kwiatek et al.
        View Abstract

    Interest in peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) has been stimulated by recent changes in its host and geographic distribution. For this study, biological specimens were collected from camels, sheep, and goats clinically suspected of having PPRV infection in Sudan during 2000–2009 and from sheep soon after the first reported outbreaks in Morocco in 2008. Reverse transcription PCR analysis confirmed the wide distribution of PPRV throughout Sudan and spread of the virus in Morocco. Molecular typing of 32 samples positive for PPRV provided strong evidence of the introduction and broad spread of Asian lineage IV. This lineage was defined further by 2 subclusters; one consisted of camel and goat isolates and some of the sheep isolates, while the other contained only sheep isolates, a finding with suggests a genetic bias according to the host. This study provides evidence of the recent spread of PPRV lineage IV in Africa.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kwiatek O, Ali YH, Saeed IK, Khalafalla AI, Mohamed OI, Abu Obeida A, et al. Asian Lineage of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus, Africa. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1223-1231. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101216
    AMA Kwiatek O, Ali YH, Saeed IK, et al. Asian Lineage of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus, Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1223-1231. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101216.
    APA Kwiatek, O., Ali, Y. H., Saeed, I. K., Khalafalla, A. I., Mohamed, O. I., Abu Obeida, A....Libeau, G. (2011). Asian Lineage of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus, Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1223-1231. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101216.
  • Co-infections of Plasmodium knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax among Humans and Anopheles dirus Mosquitoes, Southern Vietnam PDF Version [PDF - 369 KB - 8 pages]
    R. P. Marchand et al.
        View Abstract

    A single Anopheles dirus mosquito carrying sporozoites of Plasmodium knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax was recently discovered in Khanh Phu, southern Vietnam. Further sampling of humans and mosquitoes in this area during 2009–2010 showed P. knowlesi infections in 32 (26%) persons with malaria (n = 125) and in 31 (43%) sporozoite-positive An. dirus mosquitoes (n = 73). Co-infections of P. knowlesi and P. vivax were predominant in mosquitoes and humans, while single P. knowlesi infections were found only in mosquitoes. P. knowlesi–co-infected patients were largely asymptomatic and were concentrated among ethnic minority families who commonly spend nights in the forest. P. knowlesi carriers were significantly younger than those infected with other malaria parasite species. These results imply that even if human malaria could be eliminated, forests that harbor An. dirus mosquitoes and macaque monkeys will remain a reservoir for the zoonotic transmission of P. knowlesi.

        Cite This Article
    EID Marchand RP, Culleton R, Maeno Y, Quang NT, Nakazawa S. Co-infections of Plasmodium knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax among Humans and Anopheles dirus Mosquitoes, Southern Vietnam. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1232-1239. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101551
    AMA Marchand RP, Culleton R, Maeno Y, et al. Co-infections of Plasmodium knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax among Humans and Anopheles dirus Mosquitoes, Southern Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1232-1239. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101551.
    APA Marchand, R. P., Culleton, R., Maeno, Y., Quang, N. T., & Nakazawa, S. (2011). Co-infections of Plasmodium knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax among Humans and Anopheles dirus Mosquitoes, Southern Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1232-1239. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101551.
  • Epidemiology of Influenza-like Illness during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, New South Wales, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 298 KB - 8 pages]
    D. J. Muscatello et al.
        View Abstract

    To rapidly describe the epidemiology of influenza-like illness (ILI) during the 2009 winter epidemic of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in New South Wales, Australia, we used results of a continuous population health survey. During July–September 2009, ILI was experienced by 23% of the population. Among these persons, 51% were unable to undertake normal duties for <3 days, 55% sought care at a general practice, and 5% went to a hospital. Factors independently associated with ILI were younger age, daily smoking, and obesity. Effectiveness of prepandemic seasonal vaccine was ≈20%. The high prevalence of risk factors associated with a substantially increased risk for ILI deserves greater recognition.

        Cite This Article
    EID Muscatello DJ, Barr M, Thackway SV, MacIntyre C. Epidemiology of Influenza-like Illness during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, New South Wales, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1240-1247. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101173
    AMA Muscatello DJ, Barr M, Thackway SV, et al. Epidemiology of Influenza-like Illness during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, New South Wales, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1240-1247. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101173.
    APA Muscatello, D. J., Barr, M., Thackway, S. V., & MacIntyre, C. (2011). Epidemiology of Influenza-like Illness during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, New South Wales, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1240-1247. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101173.
  • Severe Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia PDF Version [PDF - 288 KB - 8 pages]
    T. William et al.
        View Abstract

    The simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi causes severe human malaria; the optimal treatment remains unknown. We describe the clinical features, disease spectrum, and response to antimalarial chemotherapy, including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate, in patients with P. knowlesi malaria diagnosed by PCR during December 2007–November 2009 at a tertiary care hospital in Sabah, Malaysia. Fifty-six patients had PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi monoinfection and clinical records available for review. Twenty-two (39%) had severe malaria; of these, 6 (27%) died. Thirteen (59%) had respiratory distress; 12 (55%), acute renal failure; and 12, shock. None experienced coma. Patients with uncomplicated disease received chloroquine, quinine, or artemether-lumefantrine, and those with severe disease received intravenous quinine or artesunate. Parasite clearance times were 1–2 days shorter with either artemether-lumefantrine or artesunate treatment. P. knowlesi is a major cause of severe and fatal malaria in Sabah. Artemisinin derivatives rapidly clear parasitemia and are efficacious in treating uncomplicated and severe knowlesi malaria.

        Cite This Article
    EID William T, Menon J, Rajahram GS, Chan L, Ma G, Donaldson S, et al. Severe Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1248-1255. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101017
    AMA William T, Menon J, Rajahram GS, et al. Severe Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1248-1255. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101017.
    APA William, T., Menon, J., Rajahram, G. S., Chan, L., Ma, G., Donaldson, S....Yeo, T. (2011). Severe Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1248-1255. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101017.

Dispatches

  • Age as Risk Factor for Death from Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Chile PDF Version [PDF - 155 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Dabanch et al.
        View Abstract

    Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 affected Chile during the winter of 2009. The hospitalization rate was 0.56% overall and 3.47% for persons >60 years of age at risk for severe disease and death independent of concurrent conditions. Age >60 years was the major risk factor for death from pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

        Cite This Article
    EID Dabanch J, Perret C, Nájera M, González C, Guerrero A, Olea A, et al. Age as Risk Factor for Death from Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Chile. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1256-1258. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101398
    AMA Dabanch J, Perret C, Nájera M, et al. Age as Risk Factor for Death from Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Chile. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1256-1258. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101398.
    APA Dabanch, J., Perret, C., Nájera, M., González, C., Guerrero, A., Olea, A....Vega, J. (2011). Age as Risk Factor for Death from Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Chile. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1256-1258. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101398.
  • Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia PDF Version [PDF - 183 KB - 4 pages]
    B. E. Ferro et al.
        View Abstract

    Using spoligotyping, we identified 13 genotypes and 17 orphan types among 160 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. The Beijing genotype represented 15.6% of the isolates and was correlated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, female sex of the patients, and residence in Buenaventura and may represent a new public health threat.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ferro BE, Nieto LM, Rozo JC, Forero L, van Soolingen D. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1259-1262. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101797
    AMA Ferro BE, Nieto LM, Rozo JC, et al. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1259-1262. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101797.
    APA Ferro, B. E., Nieto, L. M., Rozo, J. C., Forero, L., & van Soolingen, D. (2011). Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1259-1262. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101797.
  • Visceral Larva Migrans in Immigrants from Latin America PDF Version [PDF - 152 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Turrientes et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine whether increased migration is associated with an increase in incidence of toxocariasis (visceral larva migrans), we analyzed clinical data obtained from immigrants from Latin America. Although infection with Toxocara sp. roundworm larvae is distributed worldwide, seroprevalence is highest in tropical and subtropical areas.

        Cite This Article
    EID Turrientes M, Pérez de Ayala A, Norman FF, Navarro M, Pérez-Molina J, Rodriquez-Ferrer M, et al. Visceral Larva Migrans in Immigrants from Latin America. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1263-1265. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101204
    AMA Turrientes M, Pérez de Ayala A, Norman FF, et al. Visceral Larva Migrans in Immigrants from Latin America. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1263-1265. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101204.
    APA Turrientes, M., Pérez de Ayala, A., Norman, F. F., Navarro, M., Pérez-Molina, J., Rodriquez-Ferrer, M....López-Vélez, R. (2011). Visceral Larva Migrans in Immigrants from Latin America. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1263-1265. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101204.
  • Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt PDF Version [PDF - 171 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Kandeel et al.
        View Abstract

    In Egypt, vaccination against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was required of pilgrims departing for the 2009 Hajj. A survey of 551 pilgrims as they returned to Egypt found 542 (98.1% [weighted]) reported receiving the vaccine; 6 (1.0% [weighted]) were infected with influenza virus A (H3N2) but none with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kandeel A, Deming M, Abdel Kereem E, El-Refay S, Afifi S, Abukela M, et al. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1266-1268. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101484
    AMA Kandeel A, Deming M, Abdel Kereem E, et al. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1266-1268. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101484.
    APA Kandeel, A., Deming, M., Abdel Kereem, E., El-Refay, S., Afifi, S., Abukela, M....El-Gabaly, H. (2011). Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1266-1268. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101484.
  • Bartonella spp. in Bats, Guatemala PDF Version [PDF - 509 KB - 4 pages]
    Y. Bai et al.
        View Abstract

    To better understand the role of bats as reservoirs of Bartonella spp., we estimated Bartonella spp. prevalence and genetic diversity in bats in Guatemala during 2009. We found prevalence of 33% and identified 21 genetic variants of 13 phylogroups. Vampire bat–associated Bartonella spp. may cause undiagnosed illnesses in humans.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bai Y, Kosoy MY, Recuenco S, Alvarez D, Moran D, Turmelle A, et al. Bartonella spp. in Bats, Guatemala. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1269-1272. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101867
    AMA Bai Y, Kosoy MY, Recuenco S, et al. Bartonella spp. in Bats, Guatemala. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1269-1272. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101867.
    APA Bai, Y., Kosoy, M. Y., Recuenco, S., Alvarez, D., Moran, D., Turmelle, A....Rupprecht, C. E. (2011). Bartonella spp. in Bats, Guatemala. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1269-1272. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101867.
  • Clonal Genotype of Geomyces destructans among Bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA PDF Version [PDF - 363 KB - 4 pages]
    S. S. Rajkumar et al.
        View Abstract

    The dispersal mechanism of Geomyces destructans, which causes geomycosis (white nose syndrome) in hibernating bats, remains unknown. Multiple gene genealogic analyses were conducted on 16 fungal isolates from diverse sites in New York State during 2008–2010. The results are consistent with the clonal dispersal of a single G. destructans genotype.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rajkumar SS, Li X, Rudd RJ, Okoniewski JC, Xu J, Chaturvedi S, et al. Clonal Genotype of Geomyces destructans among Bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1273-1276. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102056
    AMA Rajkumar SS, Li X, Rudd RJ, et al. Clonal Genotype of Geomyces destructans among Bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1273-1276. doi:10.3201/eid1707.102056.
    APA Rajkumar, S. S., Li, X., Rudd, R. J., Okoniewski, J. C., Xu, J., Chaturvedi, S....Chaturvedi, V. (2011). Clonal Genotype of Geomyces destructans among Bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1273-1276. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102056.
  • Plasmodium vivax Malaria among Military Personnel, French Guiana, 1998–2008 PDF Version [PDF - 188 KB - 3 pages]
    B. Queyriaux et al.
        View Abstract

    We obtained health surveillance epidemiologic data on malaria among French military personnel deployed to French Guiana during 1998–2008. Incidence of Plasmodium vivax malaria increased and that of P. falciparum remained stable. This new epidemiologic situation has led to modification of malaria treatment for deployed military personnel.

        Cite This Article
    EID Queyriaux B, Texier G, Ollivier L, Galoisy-Guibal L, Michel R, Meynard J, et al. Plasmodium vivax Malaria among Military Personnel, French Guiana, 1998–2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1280-1282. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100009
    AMA Queyriaux B, Texier G, Ollivier L, et al. Plasmodium vivax Malaria among Military Personnel, French Guiana, 1998–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1280-1282. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100009.
    APA Queyriaux, B., Texier, G., Ollivier, L., Galoisy-Guibal, L., Michel, R., Meynard, J....Deparis, X. (2011). Plasmodium vivax Malaria among Military Personnel, French Guiana, 1998–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1280-1282. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100009.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei in Unchlorinated Domestic Bore Water, Tropical Northern Australia PDF Version [PDF - 200 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Mayo et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine whether unchlorinated bore water in northern Australia contained Burkholderia pseudomallei organisms, we sampled 55 bores; 18 (33%) were culture positive. Multilocus sequence typing identified 15 sequence types. The B. pseudomallei sequence type from 1 water sample matched a clinical isolate from a resident with melioidosis on the same property.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mayo M, Kaestli M, Harrington G, Cheng AC, Ward L, Karp D, et al. Burkholderia pseudomallei in Unchlorinated Domestic Bore Water, Tropical Northern Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1283-1285. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100614
    AMA Mayo M, Kaestli M, Harrington G, et al. Burkholderia pseudomallei in Unchlorinated Domestic Bore Water, Tropical Northern Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1283-1285. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100614.
    APA Mayo, M., Kaestli, M., Harrington, G., Cheng, A. C., Ward, L., Karp, D....Currie, B. J. (2011). Burkholderia pseudomallei in Unchlorinated Domestic Bore Water, Tropical Northern Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1283-1285. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100614.
  • Epidemiology and Investigation of Melioidosis, Southern Arizona PDF Version [PDF - 285 KB - 3 pages]
    T. Stewart et al.
        View Abstract

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a bacterium endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, but it has not been found to occur endemically in the United States. We report an ostensibly autochthonous case of melioidosis in the United States. Despite an extensive investigation, the source of exposure was not identified.

        Cite This Article
    EID Stewart T, Engelthaler DM, Blaney DD, Tuanyok A, Wangsness E, Smith TL, et al. Epidemiology and Investigation of Melioidosis, Southern Arizona. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1286-1288. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100661
    AMA Stewart T, Engelthaler DM, Blaney DD, et al. Epidemiology and Investigation of Melioidosis, Southern Arizona. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1286-1288. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100661.
    APA Stewart, T., Engelthaler, D. M., Blaney, D. D., Tuanyok, A., Wangsness, E., Smith, T. L....Sunenshine, R. (2011). Epidemiology and Investigation of Melioidosis, Southern Arizona. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1286-1288. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100661.
  • Melioidosis, Phnom Penh, Cambodia PDF Version [PDF - 204 KB - 4 pages]
    E. Vlieghe et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe 58 adult patients with melioidosis in Cambodia (2007–2010). Diabetes was the main risk factor (59%); 67% of infections occurred during the rainy season. Bloodstream infection was present in 67% of patients, which represents 12% of all bloodstream infections. The case-fatality rate was 52% and associated with inappropriate empiric treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Vlieghe E, Kruy L, De Smet B, Kham C, Veng CH, Phe T, et al. Melioidosis, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1289-1292. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101069
    AMA Vlieghe E, Kruy L, De Smet B, et al. Melioidosis, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1289-1292. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101069.
    APA Vlieghe, E., Kruy, L., De Smet, B., Kham, C., Veng, C. H., Phe, T....Jacobs, J. (2011). Melioidosis, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1289-1292. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101069.
  • Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs PDF Version [PDF - 226 KB - 3 pages]
    S. C. Shafir et al.
        View Abstract

    Infection with Baylisascaris procyonis roundworms is rare but often fatal and typically affects children. We attempted to determine parameters of viability and methods of inactivating the eggs of these roundworms. Loss of viability resulted when eggs were heated to 62°C or desiccated for 7 months but not when frozen at –15°C for 6 months.

        Cite This Article
    EID Shafir SC, Sorvillo FJ, Sorvillo T, Eberhard ML. Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1293-1295. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101774
    AMA Shafir SC, Sorvillo FJ, Sorvillo T, et al. Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1293-1295. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101774.
    APA Shafir, S. C., Sorvillo, F. J., Sorvillo, T., & Eberhard, M. L. (2011). Viability of Baylisascaris procyonis Eggs. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1293-1295. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101774.
  • Melioidosis Acquired by Traveler to Nigeria PDF Version [PDF - 257 KB - 3 pages]
    A. P. Salam et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe melioidosis associated with travel to Nigeria in a woman with diabetes, a major predisposing factor for this infection. With the prevalence of diabetes projected to increase dramatically in many developing countries, the global reach of melioidosis may expand.

        Cite This Article
    EID Salam AP, Khan N, Malnick H, Kenna DT, Dance D, Klein JL, et al. Melioidosis Acquired by Traveler to Nigeria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1296-1298. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110502
    AMA Salam AP, Khan N, Malnick H, et al. Melioidosis Acquired by Traveler to Nigeria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1296-1298. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110502.
    APA Salam, A. P., Khan, N., Malnick, H., Kenna, D. T., Dance, D., & Klein, J. L. (2011). Melioidosis Acquired by Traveler to Nigeria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1296-1298. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110502.
  • Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain PDF Version [PDF - 245 KB - 3 pages]
    U. Wernery et al.
        View Abstract

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wernery U, Wernery R, Joseph M, Al-Salloom F, Johnson B, Kinne J, et al. Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1277-1279. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110222
    AMA Wernery U, Wernery R, Joseph M, et al. Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1277-1279. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110222.
    APA Wernery, U., Wernery, R., Joseph, M., Al-Salloom, F., Johnson, B., Kinne, J....Scholz, H. C. (2011). Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1277-1279. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110222.

Commentaries

  • Implications of the Introduction of Cholera to Haiti PDF Version [PDF - 116 KB - 2 pages]
    S. F. Dowell and C. R. Braden
            Cite This Article
    EID Dowell SF, Braden CR. Implications of the Introduction of Cholera to Haiti. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1299-1300. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110625
    AMA Dowell SF, Braden CR. Implications of the Introduction of Cholera to Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1299-1300. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110625.
    APA Dowell, S. F., & Braden, C. R. (2011). Implications of the Introduction of Cholera to Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1299-1300. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110625.

Letters

  • Trichostrongylus colubriformis Nematode Infections in Humans, France PDF Version [PDF - 237 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Lattès et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lattès S, Ferté H, Delaunay P, Depaquit J, Vassallo M, Vittier M, et al. Trichostrongylus colubriformis Nematode Infections in Humans, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1301-1302. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101519
    AMA Lattès S, Ferté H, Delaunay P, et al. Trichostrongylus colubriformis Nematode Infections in Humans, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1301-1302. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101519.
    APA Lattès, S., Ferté, H., Delaunay, P., Depaquit, J., Vassallo, M., Vittier, M....Marty, P. (2011). Trichostrongylus colubriformis Nematode Infections in Humans, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1301-1302. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101519.
  • Adult Opisthorchis viverrini Flukes in Humans, Takeo, Cambodia PDF Version [PDF - 213 KB - 3 pages]
    W. Sohn et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Sohn W, Shin E, Yong T, Eom KS, Jeong H, Sinuon M, et al. Adult Opisthorchis viverrini Flukes in Humans, Takeo, Cambodia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1302-1304. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102071
    AMA Sohn W, Shin E, Yong T, et al. Adult Opisthorchis viverrini Flukes in Humans, Takeo, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1302-1304. doi:10.3201/eid1707.102071.
    APA Sohn, W., Shin, E., Yong, T., Eom, K. S., Jeong, H., Sinuon, M....Chai, J. (2011). Adult Opisthorchis viverrini Flukes in Humans, Takeo, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1302-1304. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102071.
  • Easy Test for Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post–Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis PDF Version [PDF - 202 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Saha et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Saha S, Goswami R, Pramanik N, Guha SK, Saha B, Rahman M, et al. Easy Test for Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post–Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1304-1306. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100801
    AMA Saha S, Goswami R, Pramanik N, et al. Easy Test for Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post–Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1304-1306. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100801.
    APA Saha, S., Goswami, R., Pramanik, N., Guha, S. K., Saha, B., Rahman, M....Ali, N. (2011). Easy Test for Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post–Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1304-1306. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100801.
  • Ameba-associated Keratitis, France PDF Version [PDF - 202 KB - 3 pages]
    G. Cohen et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Cohen G, Hoffart L, La Scola B, Raoult D, Drancourt M. Ameba-associated Keratitis, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1306-1308. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100826
    AMA Cohen G, Hoffart L, La Scola B, et al. Ameba-associated Keratitis, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1306-1308. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100826.
    APA Cohen, G., Hoffart, L., La Scola, B., Raoult, D., & Drancourt, M. (2011). Ameba-associated Keratitis, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1306-1308. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100826.
  • Human Herpesvirus 1 in Wild Marmosets, Brazil, 2008 PDF Version [PDF - 263 KB - 3 pages]
    C. S. Longa et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Longa CS, Bruno SF, Pires AR, Romijn PC, Kimura LS, Costa CH, et al. Human Herpesvirus 1 in Wild Marmosets, Brazil, 2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1308-1310. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100333
    AMA Longa CS, Bruno SF, Pires AR, et al. Human Herpesvirus 1 in Wild Marmosets, Brazil, 2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1308-1310. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100333.
    APA Longa, C. S., Bruno, S. F., Pires, A. R., Romijn, P. C., Kimura, L. S., & Costa, C. H. (2011). Human Herpesvirus 1 in Wild Marmosets, Brazil, 2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1308-1310. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100333.
  • Melioidosis in Birds and Burkholderia pseudomallei Dispersal, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 208 KB - 3 pages]
    V. Hampton et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Hampton V, Kaestli M, Mayo M, Choy JL, Harrington G, Richardson L, et al. Melioidosis in Birds and Burkholderia pseudomallei Dispersal, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1310-1312. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100707
    AMA Hampton V, Kaestli M, Mayo M, et al. Melioidosis in Birds and Burkholderia pseudomallei Dispersal, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1310-1312. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100707.
    APA Hampton, V., Kaestli, M., Mayo, M., Choy, J. L., Harrington, G., Richardson, L....Currie, B. J. (2011). Melioidosis in Birds and Burkholderia pseudomallei Dispersal, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1310-1312. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100707.
  • Rare Case of Trichomonal Peritonitis PDF Version [PDF - 183 KB - 2 pages]
    C. A. Zalonis et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Zalonis CA, Pillay A, Secor W, Humburg B, Aber R. Rare Case of Trichomonal Peritonitis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1312-1313. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100892
    AMA Zalonis CA, Pillay A, Secor W, et al. Rare Case of Trichomonal Peritonitis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1312-1313. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100892.
    APA Zalonis, C. A., Pillay, A., Secor, W., Humburg, B., & Aber, R. (2011). Rare Case of Trichomonal Peritonitis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1312-1313. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100892.
  • Plasmodium knowlesi Reinfection in Human PDF Version [PDF - 197 KB - 2 pages]
    Y. Lau et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lau Y, Tan LH, Chin LC, Fong M, Noraishah MA, Rohela M, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi Reinfection in Human. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1314-1315. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101295
    AMA Lau Y, Tan LH, Chin LC, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi Reinfection in Human. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1314-1315. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101295.
    APA Lau, Y., Tan, L. H., Chin, L. C., Fong, M., Noraishah, M. A., & Rohela, M. (2011). Plasmodium knowlesi Reinfection in Human. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1314-1315. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101295.
  • Antibody to Arenaviruses in Rodents, Caribbean Colombia PDF Version [PDF - 176 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Mattar et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mattar S, Guzmán C, Arrazola J, Soto E, Barrios J, Pini N, et al. Antibody to Arenaviruses in Rodents, Caribbean Colombia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1315-1317. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101961
    AMA Mattar S, Guzmán C, Arrazola J, et al. Antibody to Arenaviruses in Rodents, Caribbean Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1315-1317. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101961.
    APA Mattar, S., Guzmán, C., Arrazola, J., Soto, E., Barrios, J., Pini, N....Mills, J. N. (2011). Antibody to Arenaviruses in Rodents, Caribbean Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1315-1317. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101961.
  • High Incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children, Bangladesh PDF Version [PDF - 146 KB - 2 pages]
    Z. Islam et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Islam Z, Jacobs BC, Islam MB, Mohammad QD, Diorditsa S, Endtz HP, et al. High Incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children, Bangladesh. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1317-1318. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101999
    AMA Islam Z, Jacobs BC, Islam MB, et al. High Incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children, Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1317-1318. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101999.
    APA Islam, Z., Jacobs, B. C., Islam, M. B., Mohammad, Q. D., Diorditsa, S., & Endtz, H. P. (2011). High Incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Children, Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1317-1318. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101999.
  • Rift Valley Fever in Ruminants, Republic of Comoros, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 150 KB - 2 pages]
    M. Roger et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Roger M, Girard S, Faharoudine A, Halifa M, Bouloy M, Cetre-Sossah C, et al. Rift Valley Fever in Ruminants, Republic of Comoros, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1319-1320. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102031
    AMA Roger M, Girard S, Faharoudine A, et al. Rift Valley Fever in Ruminants, Republic of Comoros, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1319-1320. doi:10.3201/eid1707.102031.
    APA Roger, M., Girard, S., Faharoudine, A., Halifa, M., Bouloy, M., Cetre-Sossah, C....Cardinale, E. (2011). Rift Valley Fever in Ruminants, Republic of Comoros, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1319-1320. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102031.
  • Yersinia pestis in Small Rodents, Mongolia PDF Version [PDF - 228 KB - 3 pages]
    J. M. Riehm et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Riehm JM, Tserennorov D, Kiefer D, Stuermer IW, Tomaso H, Zöller L, et al. Yersinia pestis in Small Rodents, Mongolia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1320-1322. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100740
    AMA Riehm JM, Tserennorov D, Kiefer D, et al. Yersinia pestis in Small Rodents, Mongolia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1320-1322. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100740.
    APA Riehm, J. M., Tserennorov, D., Kiefer, D., Stuermer, I. W., Tomaso, H., Zöller, L....Scholz, H. C. (2011). Yersinia pestis in Small Rodents, Mongolia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1320-1322. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100740.
  • Typhoon-related Leptospirosis and Melioidosis, Taiwan, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 174 KB - 3 pages]
    H. Su et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Su H, Chan T, Chang C. Typhoon-related Leptospirosis and Melioidosis, Taiwan, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1322-1324. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101050
    AMA Su H, Chan T, Chang C. Typhoon-related Leptospirosis and Melioidosis, Taiwan, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1322-1324. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101050.
    APA Su, H., Chan, T., & Chang, C. (2011). Typhoon-related Leptospirosis and Melioidosis, Taiwan, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1322-1324. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101050.
  • Exposure to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus, New York, USA PDF Version [PDF - 149 KB - 2 pages]
    B. Knust et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Knust B, MacNeil A, Wong SJ, Backenson PB, Gibbons A, Rollin PE, et al. Exposure to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus, New York, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1324-1325. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101349
    AMA Knust B, MacNeil A, Wong SJ, et al. Exposure to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus, New York, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1324-1325. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101349.
    APA Knust, B., MacNeil, A., Wong, S. J., Backenson, P. B., Gibbons, A., Rollin, P. E....Nichol, S. T. (2011). Exposure to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus, New York, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1324-1325. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101349.
  • Tickborne Relapsing Fever Caused by Borrelia persica, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan PDF Version [PDF - 168 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Colin de Verdière et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Colin de Verdière N, Hamane S, Assous M, Sertour N, Ferquel E, Cornet M, et al. Tickborne Relapsing Fever Caused by Borrelia persica, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1325-1327. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101894
    AMA Colin de Verdière N, Hamane S, Assous M, et al. Tickborne Relapsing Fever Caused by Borrelia persica, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1325-1327. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101894.
    APA Colin de Verdière, N., Hamane, S., Assous, M., Sertour, N., Ferquel, E., & Cornet, M. (2011). Tickborne Relapsing Fever Caused by Borrelia persica, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1325-1327. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101894.
  • Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France PDF Version [PDF - 154 KB - 2 pages]
    C. Pomares et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Pomares C, Ajzenberg D, Bornard L, Bernardin G, Hasseine L, Dardé M, et al. Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1327-1328. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101642
    AMA Pomares C, Ajzenberg D, Bornard L, et al. Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1327-1328. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101642.
    APA Pomares, C., Ajzenberg, D., Bornard, L., Bernardin, G., Hasseine, L., Dardé, M....Marty, P. (2011). Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1327-1328. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101642.
  • Israeli Spotted Fever, Tunisia PDF Version [PDF - 165 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Znazen et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Znazen A, Hammami B, Lahiani D, Ben Jemaa M, Hammami A. Israeli Spotted Fever, Tunisia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1328-1330. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101648
    AMA Znazen A, Hammami B, Lahiani D, et al. Israeli Spotted Fever, Tunisia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1328-1330. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101648.
    APA Znazen, A., Hammami, B., Lahiani, D., Ben Jemaa, M., & Hammami, A. (2011). Israeli Spotted Fever, Tunisia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1328-1330. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101648.
  • Catabacter hongkongensis Bacteremia with Fatal Septic Shock PDF Version [PDF - 182 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Elsendoorn et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Elsendoorn A, Robert R, Culos A, Roblot F, Burucoa C. Catabacter hongkongensis Bacteremia with Fatal Septic Shock. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1330-1331. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101773
    AMA Elsendoorn A, Robert R, Culos A, et al. Catabacter hongkongensis Bacteremia with Fatal Septic Shock. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1330-1331. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101773.
    APA Elsendoorn, A., Robert, R., Culos, A., Roblot, F., & Burucoa, C. (2011). Catabacter hongkongensis Bacteremia with Fatal Septic Shock. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1330-1331. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101773.
  • Endemic Angiostrongyliasis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 209 KB - 3 pages]
    R. O. Simões et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Simões RO, Monteiro FA, Sánchez E, Thiengo SC, Garcia JS, Costa-Neto SF, et al. Endemic Angiostrongyliasis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1331-1333. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101822
    AMA Simões RO, Monteiro FA, Sánchez E, et al. Endemic Angiostrongyliasis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1331-1333. doi:10.3201/eid1707.101822.
    APA Simões, R. O., Monteiro, F. A., Sánchez, E., Thiengo, S. C., Garcia, J. S., Costa-Neto, S. F....Maldonado, A. (2011). Endemic Angiostrongyliasis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1331-1333. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.101822.
  • Aircraft and Risk of Importing a New Vector of Visceral Leishmaniasis PDF Version [PDF - 307 KB - 2 pages]
    C. H. Costa and I. K. de Miranda-Santos
            Cite This Article
    EID Costa CH, de Miranda-Santos IK. Aircraft and Risk of Importing a New Vector of Visceral Leishmaniasis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1333-1334. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102002
    AMA Costa CH, de Miranda-Santos IK. Aircraft and Risk of Importing a New Vector of Visceral Leishmaniasis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1333-1334. doi:10.3201/eid1707.102002.
    APA Costa, C. H., & de Miranda-Santos, I. K. (2011). Aircraft and Risk of Importing a New Vector of Visceral Leishmaniasis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1333-1334. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.102002.
  • Enzootic Angiostrongyliasis, Guangdong, China, 2008–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 180 KB - 2 pages]
    Z. Qu et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Qu Z, Yang X, Cheng M, Lin Y, Liu X, He A, et al. Enzootic Angiostrongyliasis, Guangdong, China, 2008–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1335-1336. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100714
    AMA Qu Z, Yang X, Cheng M, et al. Enzootic Angiostrongyliasis, Guangdong, China, 2008–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1335-1336. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100714.
    APA Qu, Z., Yang, X., Cheng, M., Lin, Y., Liu, X., He, A....Zhan, X. (2011). Enzootic Angiostrongyliasis, Guangdong, China, 2008–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1335-1336. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100714.
  • Malaria, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, 2001–2006 PDF Version [PDF - 156 KB - 2 pages]
    D. Olana et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Olana D, Chibsa S, Teshome D, Mekasha A, Graves PM, Reithinger R, et al. Malaria, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, 2001–2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1336-1337. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100942
    AMA Olana D, Chibsa S, Teshome D, et al. Malaria, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, 2001–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1336-1337. doi:10.3201/eid1707.100942.
    APA Olana, D., Chibsa, S., Teshome, D., Mekasha, A., Graves, P. M., & Reithinger, R. (2011). Malaria, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, 2001–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1336-1337. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.100942.
  • Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States PDF Version [PDF - 164 KB - 3 pages]
    C. W. Hedberg
            Cite This Article
    EID Hedberg CW. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1338-1340. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110019
    AMA Hedberg CW. Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1338-1340. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110019.
    APA Hedberg, C. W. (2011). Foodborne Illness Acquired in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1338-1340. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110019.
  • Comment on Zoonoses in the Bedroom PDF Version [PDF - 201 KB - 2 pages]
    S. P. Montgomery et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Montgomery SP, Xiao L, Cama V. Comment on Zoonoses in the Bedroom. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1340-1341. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110317
    AMA Montgomery SP, Xiao L, Cama V. Comment on Zoonoses in the Bedroom. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1340-1341. doi:10.3201/eid1707.110317.
    APA Montgomery, S. P., Xiao, L., & Cama, V. (2011). Comment on Zoonoses in the Bedroom. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1340-1341. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.110317.

About the Cover

  • The Tortoise and the Hut PDF Version [PDF - 187 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. The Tortoise and the Hut. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1342-1343. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.AC1707
    AMA Potter P. The Tortoise and the Hut. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1342-1343. doi:10.3201/eid1707.AC1707.
    APA Potter, P. (2011). The Tortoise and the Hut. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1342-1343. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.AC1707.

Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Melioidosis PDF Version [PDF - 181 KB - 1 page]
    N. Männikkö
            Cite This Article
    EID Männikkö N. Etymologia: Melioidosis . Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17(7):1341. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.ET1707
    AMA Männikkö N. Etymologia: Melioidosis . Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(7):1341. doi:10.3201/eid1707.ET1707.
    APA Männikkö, N. (2011). Etymologia: Melioidosis . Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(7), 1341. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1707.ET1707.

Conference Summaries

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