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Volume 18, Number 10—October 2012

Research

WU and KI Polyomaviruses in Respiratory Samples from Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

Jane Kuypers1Comments to Author , Angela P. Campbell1, Katherine A. Guthrie, Nancy L. Wright, Janet A. Englund, Lawrence Corey, and Michael Boeckh
Author affiliations: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA (J. Kuypers, A.P. Campbell, N.L. Wright, J.A. Englund, L. Corey, M. Boeckh); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle (J. Kuypers, A.P. Campbell, K.A. Guthrie, J.A. Englund, L. Corey, M. Boeckh); and Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle (A.P. Campbell, J.A. Englund)

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Figure 3

Detection of A) KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) DNA in 28 hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients with >2 KIPyV-positive specimens and B) WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) DNA in 6 HCT recipients with >2 WUPyV-positive specimens, with and without detection of a respiratory virus by day after transplantation. Each line represents 1 patient in order of age (KIPyV-positive patients 1–10 and WUPyV-positive patients 1 and 2 are <20 years of age). Circles indicate specimen collection. Gray indicate

Figure 3. . . . Detection of A) KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) DNA in 28 hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients with >2 KIPyV-positive specimens and B) WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) DNA in 6 HCT recipients with >2 WUPyV-positive specimens, with and without detection of a respiratory virus by day after transplantation. Each line represents 1 patient in order of age (KIPyV-positive patients 1–10 and WUPyV-positive patients 1 and 2 are <20 years of age). Circles indicate specimen collection. Gray indicates detection of only KIPyV or WUPyV, black indicates detection of KIPyV or WUPyV and a respiratory virus, and white indicates negative results for KIPyV or WUPyV.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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