Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 18, Number 2—February 2012

Research

Pathogenesis of Avian Bornavirus in Experimentally Infected Cockatiels

Anne K. PiepenbringComments to Author , Dirk Enderlein, Sibylle Herzog, Erhard F. Kaleta, Ursula Heffels-Redmann, Saskia Ressmeyer, Christiane Herden, and Michael Lierz
Author affiliations: Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany

Main Article

Figure 3

Avian bornavirus antibody in cockatiels inoculated intracerebrally (A) and intravenously (B) with avian bornavirus. In both groups, an exponential rise in antibody titers was detected within the first 12 weeks after inoculation and was followed by a plateau of high antibody titers (<20,480).

Figure 3. Avian bornavirus antibody in cockatiels inoculated intracerebrally (A) and intravenously (B) with avian bornavirus. In both groups, an exponential rise in antibody titers was detected within the first 12 weeks after inoculation and was followed by a plateau of high antibody titers (<20,480).

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

World Malaria Day - April 25, 2014 - Invest in the future, defeat malaria

20th Anniversary - National Infant Immunization Week - Immunization. Power to Protect.

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO