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Volume 10, Number 4—April 2004
Dispatch

West Nile Virus and High Death Rate in American Crows

Sarah A. Yaremych*Comments to Author , Richard E. Warner*, Phil C. Mankin*, Jeff D. Brawn*, Arlo Raim†, and Robert Novak†
Author affiliations: *University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; †Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, Illinois, USA

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Figure

Survival curve (Kaplan-Meier curve; staggered-entry method) (10,11) for radio-tracked American Crows (N = 39) relative to the weekly minimum infection rates (MIR) of mosquitoes collected by week at radio-tracked crow roost sites in east-central Illinois in 2002.

Figure. Survival curve (Kaplan-Meier curve; staggered-entry method) (10,11) for radio-tracked American Crows (N = 39) relative to the weekly minimum infection rates (MIR) of mosquitoes collected by week at radio-tracked crow roost sites in east-central Illinois in 2002.

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