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Volume 12, Number 12—December 2006
Synopsis

Review of Bats and SARS

Lin-Fa Wang*Comments to Author , Zhengli Shi†, Shuyi Zhang‡§, Hume E. Field¶, Peter Daszak#, and Bryan T. Eaton*
Author affiliations: *Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia; †Wuhan Institute of Virology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; ‡Institute of Zoology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; §East China Normal University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; ¶Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; #Consortium for Conservation Medicine, New York, New York USA

Main Article

Table 1

Animal species susceptible to infection by SARS coronavirus*

Animal
Mode of infection Clinical signs References
Common name Taxonomic name
Masked palm civet Paguma larvata Natural None observed (9)
Experimental Fever, lethargy, reduced appetite (11)
Racoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides Natural None observed (9)
Chinese ferret badger Melogale moschata Natural None observed (9)
Cynomolgus macaque Macaca facicularis Experimental Lethargy, skin rash, respiratory distress (12)
Rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta Experimental Fever, low appetite (13,14)
African green monkey Cercopithecus aethiops Experimental None observed (15)
Ferret Mustela furo Experimental Lethargy, mild pulmonary lesions (16)
Golden hamster Mesocricetus auratus Experimental None observed (17)
Guinea pig Cavia porcellus Experimental None observed (18)
Mouse Mus musculus Experimental Aged animal (12–14 mo): weight loss, hunched posture, ruffled fur, slight dehydration (19)
Young animal (4–6 weeks): none observed (20)
Rat Rattus rattus Experimental None observed B.T. Eaton et al., unpub. data
Domestic cat Felis domesticus Natural Not reported (16)
Experimental None observed (16)
Pig Sus scrofa Natural Not reported (21)
Experimental None observed (22)

*SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome.

*SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome.

*SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome.

Main Article

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Page created: October 04, 2011
Page updated: October 04, 2011
Page reviewed: October 04, 2011
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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