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Volume 14, Number 3—March 2008
Dispatch

Protective Effect of Maritime Quarantine in South Pacific Jurisdictions, 1918–19 Influenza Pandemic

Melissa A. McLeod*, Michael G. Baker*, Nick Wilson*Comments to Author , Heath Kelly†, Tom Kiedrzynski‡, and Jacob L. Kool§
Author affiliations: *University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand; †Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia; ‡Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Noumea, New Caledonia; §World Health Organization Office for the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji;

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Figure

Comparison of attributable mortality rate from pandemic influenza versus time of arrival of influenza into South Pacific Island jurisdictions for the pandemic beginning in 1918. Sources for mortality data with wave-specific crude mortality rates per 1,000 population (r) from pandemic influenza: American Samoa (r = 0) (7,8); Australia (Continental) (r = 2.4) (9); Fiji (r = 52) (2); Guam (r = 45) (8,10); Nauru (r = 160) (3); New Caledonia (r<10) (11); New Zealand (r = 7.4) (12); Samoa (r = 220) (2); Tahiti (r = 190) (13); Tasmania (r = 0.81) (6); and Tonga (r = 840) (2). Sources for date of pandemic influenza arrival data (where different from the source of the mortality data detailed above): Australia (Continental) (5). Blue square, strict maritime quarantine; red diamond, incomplete maritime quarantine; green circle, no border control.

Figure. Comparison of attributable mortality rate from pandemic influenza versus time of arrival of influenza into South Pacific Island jurisdictions for the pandemic beginning in 1918. Sources for mortality data with wave-specific crude mortality rates per 1,000 population (r) from pandemic influenza: American Samoa (r = 0) (7,8); Australia (Continental) (r = 2.4) (9); Fiji (r = 52) (2); Guam (r = 45) (8,10); Nauru (r = 160) (3); New Caledonia (r<10) (11); New Zealand (r = 7.4) (12); Samoa (r = 220) (2); Tahiti (r = 190) (13); Tasmania (r = 0.81) (6); and Tonga (r = 840) (2). Sources for date of pandemic influenza arrival data (where different from the source of the mortality data detailed above): Australia (Continental) (5). Blue square, strict maritime quarantine; red diamond, incomplete maritime quarantine; green circle, no border control.

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