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Volume 18, Number 5—May 2012
Research

Epidemic of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, Western Canada, 2005–2009

Gregory J. TyrrellComments to Author , Marguerite Lovgren, Quazi Ibrahim, Sipi Garg, Linda Chui, Tyler J. Boone, Carol Mangan, David M. Patrick1, Linda Hoang, Greg B. Horsman, Paul Van Caeseele, and Thomas J. Marrie2
Author affiliations: Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (Microbiology) Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (G.J. Tyrrell, M. Lovgren, Q. Ibrahim, S. Garg, L Chui, T.J. Boone, C. Mangan, T.J. Marrie); University of Alberta, Edmonton (G.J. Tyrrell, M. Lovgren, Q. Ibrahim, S. Garg, L Chui, T.J. Boone, C. Mangan, T.J. Marrie); British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (D.M. Patrick, L. Hoang); Saskatchewan Disease Control Laboratory, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada (G.B. Horsman); Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (P. Van Caeseele)

Main Article

Figure 4

Restriction fragment-length polymorphism pattern of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 5 from epidemic in western Canada, 2000–2009 (epidemic clone), determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The Colombia5-19 strain is from the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (www.sph.emory.edu/PMEN) (17).

Figure 4. . . Restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 5 from epidemic in western Canada, 2000–2009 (epidemic clone), determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The Colombia5-19 strain is from the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (www.sph.emory.edu/PMEN) (17).

Main Article

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1Current affiliation: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

2Current affiliation: Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Page created: April 12, 2012
Page updated: April 12, 2012
Page reviewed: April 12, 2012
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