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Volume 20, Number 2—February 2014

Dispatch

Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates in 2 Pet Iguanas, California, USA

Ashley M. Zehnder1, Michelle G. Hawkins, Marilyn A. Koski, Barry Lifland, Barbara A. Byrne, Alexandra A. Swanson, Michael P. Rood, Jay E. GeeComments to Author , Mindy Glass Elrod, Cari A. Beesley, David D. Blaney, Jean Ventura, Alex R. Hoffmaster, and Emily S. Beeler
Author affiliations: School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA (A.M. Zehnder, M.G. Hawkins, M.A. Koski, B.A. Byrne); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA (B. Lifland); Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, California, USA (A.A. Swanson, M.P. Rood, E.S. Beeler); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (J.E. Gee, M.G. Elrod, C.A. Beesley, D.D. Blaney, A.R. Hoffmaster); Sacramento County Department of Public Health, Sacramento, California, USA (J. Ventura)

Main Article

Figure

Abscess on shoulder of iguana infected with Burkholderia pseudomallei, California, USA, 2013. A) Lateral view. B) Dorsal view. Photo was taken at the time of sampling surface of animal and its environment.

Figure. . Abscess on shoulder of iguana infected with Burkholderia pseudomallei, California, USA, 2013. A) Lateral view. B) Dorsal view. Photo was taken at the time of sampling surface of animal and its environment.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.

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