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Volume 22, Number 10—October 2016
Dispatch

Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico

Nohemi Cigarroa-Toledo, Bradley J. Blitvich, Rosa C. Cetina-Trejo, Lourdes G. Talavera-Aguilar, Carlos M. Baak-Baak, Oswaldo M. Torres-Chablé, Md-Nafiz Hamid, Iddo Friedberg, Pedro González-Martinez, Gabriela Alonzo-Salomon, Elsy P. Rosado-Paredes, Nubia Rivero-Cárdenas, Guadalupe C. Reyes-Solis, Jose A. Farfan-Ale, Julian E. Garcia-Rejon, and Carlos Machain-WilliamsComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Merida, Mexico (N. Cigarroa-Toledo, R.C. Cetina-Trejo, L.G. Talavera-Aguilar, C.M. Baak-Baak, O.M. Torres-Chablé, P. González-Martinez, G. Alonzo-Salomon, E.P. Rosado-Paredes, N. Rivero-Cárdenas, G.C. Reyes-Solis, J.A. Farfan-Ale, J.E. Garcia-Rejon, C. Machain-Williams); Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA (B.J. Blitvich, M. Hamid, I. Friedberg)

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Figure

Phylogenetic analysis of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) isolates from Yucatan, Mexico. Analysis was based on a 3,744-nt structural gene region (capsid-E3-E2-6K-E1) of 63 CHIKV isolates, including the 14 isolates from Yucatan. Sequences were aligned by using MUSCLE (11), and the tree was constructed by using the neighbor-joining algorithm as implemented in PHYLIP (12) and using ETE3 (Environment for Tree Exploration 3) (13). Isolates are identified by GenBank accession number, country, and year isolat

Figure. Phylogenetic analysis of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) isolates from Yucatan, Mexico. Analysis was based on a 3,744-nt structural gene region (capsid-E3-E2-6K-E1) of 63 CHIKV isolates, including the 14 isolates from Yucatan. Sequences were aligned by using MUSCLE (11), and the tree was constructed by using the neighbor-joining algorithm as implemented in PHYLIP (12) and using ETE3 (Environment for Tree Exploration 3) (13). Isolates are identified by GenBank accession number, country, and year isolated. CHIKV isolates from the Yucatan are shown in bold. Bootstrap values were generated by using 1,000 repetitions and normalized on a scale of 0–1. Bootstrap values for select branches are shown. 6K, membrane-associated peptide; E, envelope; ECSA, East/Central/South African lineage; IOL, Indian Ocean lineage.

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Page updated: September 19, 2016
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