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Volume 22, Number 4—April 2016
Dispatch

Definitive Hosts of Versteria Tapeworms (Cestoda: Taeniidae) Causing Fatal Infection in North America

Laura M. Lee, Roberta S. Wallace, Victoria L. Clyde, Annette Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Samuel D. Sibley, Margot Stuchin, Michael Lauck, David H. O’Connor, Minoru Nakao, Antti Lavikainen, Eric P. Hoberg, and Tony L. GoldbergComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA (L.M. Lee, A. Gendron-Fitzpatrick, S.D. Sibley, M. Lauck, D.H. O’Connor); Milwaukee County Zoo, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA (R.S. Wallace, V.L. Clyde, A. Gendron-Fitzpatrick); Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (M. Stuchin); Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison (M. Lauck, D.H. O’Connor, T.L. Goldberg); Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan (M. Nakao); University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland (A. Lavikainen); United States National Parasite Collection, Beltsville, Maryland, USA (E.P. Hoberg)

Main Article

Figure 1

Microscope image of a mature segment of an adult Versteria sp. tapeworm recovered from an ermine in Wisconsin, USA (original magnification ×10). Characteristic reproductive structures are visible, including genital pore (G), cirrus sac (C), vagina (V), ovary (O), testes (T), uterine stem (U), and vitelline gland (VG). Tapeworm specimens were preserved in 70% ethanol for concurrent morphologic and molecular analyses. A series of proglottids was subsampled from each worm as a basis for sequencing;

Figure 1. Microscope image of a mature segment of an adult Versteria sp. tapeworm recovered from an ermine in Wisconsin, USA (original magnification ×10). Characteristic reproductive structures are visible, including genital pore (G), cirrus sac (C), vagina (V), ovary (O), testes (T), uterine stem (U), and vitelline gland (VG). Tapeworm specimens were preserved in 70% ethanol for concurrent morphologic and molecular analyses. A series of proglottids was subsampled from each worm as a basis for sequencing; remaining strobila was stained, cleared and mounted in Canada balsam as permanent vouchers based on standard methods (5). Specimens are deposited in the Museum of Southwestern Biology, Parasitology Division, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA (accession no. MSB 23169), and in the collections of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado, USA (accession no. DZTM.3170). Scale bar indicates 500 µm.

Main Article

References
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Medline reports the last page should be "183" not "84" in reference 3 "Loos-Frank, 2000".

Medline indexes "Biol J Linn Soc Lond" but cannot find a listing for reference 7 "Smith, Patton, 1993". Please check the reference for accuracy.

Medline indexes "J Biogeogr" but cannot find a listing for reference 9 "Dawson, Hope, Talbot, Cook, 2014". Please check the reference for accuracy.

Page created: March 16, 2016
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