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Volume 22, Number 4—April 2016
Letter

Chronic Infection of Domestic Cats with Feline Morbillivirus, United States

Claire R. Sharp, Sham Nambulli, Andrew S. Acciardo, Linda J. Rennick, J. Felix Drexler, Bertus K. Rima, Tracey Williams, and W. Paul DuprexComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, USA (C.R. Sharp); Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (S. Nambulli, A.S. Acciardo, L.J. Rennick, W.P. Duprex); University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany (J.F. Drexler); German Center for Infection Research, Bonn-Cologne Germany (J.F. Drexler); The Queen’s University of Belfast School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Biomedical Sciences, Belfast, Northern Ireland (B.K. Rima); Zoetis LLC, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA (T. Williams)

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Figure

Phylogenetic analysis of feline morbillivirus (FeMV) whole genomes and hemagglutinin (H) genes collected from cats in the United States. A) Genomic sequence identity of FeMVUS1, compared with Asian strains, performed by using SSE V1.2 software (4) with a sliding window of 400 and a step size of 40 nt. B) Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the translated H gene of FeMVs, the genus Morbillivirus, sensu strictu, and unclassified morbilli-related viruses was determined by using MEGA5 software (5) and a

Figure. Phylogenetic analysis of feline morbillivirus (FeMV) whole genomes and hemagglutinin (H) genes collected from cats in the United States. A) Genomic sequence identity of FeMVUS1, compared with Asian strains, performed by using SSE V1.2 software (4) with a sliding window of 400 and a step size of 40 nt. B) Maximum-likelihood phylogeny of the translated H gene of FeMVs, the genus Morbillivirus, sensu strictu, and unclassified morbilli-related viruses was determined by using MEGA5 software (5) and applying the Whelan-and-Goldman substitution model and a complete deletion option. Numbers at nodes indicate support of grouping from 1,000 bootstrap replicates. Scale bar indicates substitutions per site.

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Page updated: March 16, 2016
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