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Volume 23, Number 2—February 2017

Dispatch

Norovirus GII.17 Natural Infections in Rhesus Monkeys, China

Zhanlong He1, Bo Liu1, Yufen Tao, Chao Li, Ming Xia, Weiming Zhong, Xi Jiang, Hongqi LiuComments to Author , and Ming TanComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Institute of Medical Biology at the Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Kunming, Yunnan Province, China (Z. He, B. Liu, Y. Tao, C. Li, H. Liu); Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (M. Xia, W. Zhong, X. Jiang, M. Tan)

Main Article

Figure 1

Phylogenetic analysis based on the viral capsid protein 1 genes of the monkey GII.17 norovirus and other reference human GII.17 noroviruses. The analysis involved 20 full-length viral capsid protein 1–encoding genes (gene identification shown), including 17 previously reported GII.17 human norovirus representatives (black square indicates that reported in (9); black triangle indicates human GII.17 variants circulating in China [Figure 2]), the monkey GII.17 norovirus from this report (black circ

Figure 1. Phylogenetic analysis based on the viral capsid protein 1 genes of the monkey GII.17 norovirus and other reference human GII.17 noroviruses. The analysis involved 20 full-length viral capsid protein 1–encoding genes (gene identification shown), including 17 previously reported GII.17 human norovirus representatives. Black square indicates noroviruses reported in (9); black triangle indicates human GII.17 variants circulating in China as reported in (2); black circle indicates the monkey GII.17 norovirus from this study. Comparison viruses are 1 from GII.13 genotype and 1 from GII.21 genotype. The evolutionary history was inferred by using the neighbor-joining method. The optimal tree with the branch length sum of 0.91354301 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) are shown above the branches. The tree is drawn to scale; branch lengths are in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed by using the Tajima-Nei method and represent the number of base substitutions per site. The analysis involved 20 nt sequences. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated. The final dataset contained a total of 1,265 positions. Evolutionary analyses were conducted in MEGA6 (http://www.megasoftware.net).

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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