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Volume 23, Number 2—February 2017

Dispatch

Seroprevalence and Transmission of Human Influenza A(H5N1) Virus before and after Virus Reassortment, Cambodia, 2006–2014

Sowath Ly, Paul F. Horwood, Malen Chan, Sareth Rith, Sopheak Sorn, Kunthea Oeung, Kunthy Nguon, Siam Chan, Phalla Y, Amy Parry, Reiko Tsuyuoka, Sovann Ly, Beat Richner, Denis Laurent, Sirenda Vong, Philippe Dussart, Philippe Buchy, and Arnaud TarantolaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Phnom Penh, Cambodia (S. Ly, P. Horwood, M. Chan, P. Y, S. Rith, S. Sorn, K. Oeung K. Nguon, S. Chan, S. Vong, P. Dussart,, P. Buchy, A. Tarantola); World Health Organization, Phnom Penh (A. Parry, R. Tsuyuoka); Ministry of Health, Phnom Penh (S. Ly); Kantha Bopha Children's Hospitals, Siem Reap and Phnom Penh, Cambodia (B. Richner, D. Laurent); GSK Vaccines R&D, Singapore (P. Buchy)

Main Article

Figure

Geographic distribution of identified human cases in influenza A(H5N1)–affected villages, Cambodia, 2006–2014,  Institut Pasteur du Cambodge,  2005–2014 (circles indicate areas investigated in 2014). Village distribution reflects population density. “Commune affected by A(H5N1)” refers to Cambodian communes in which A(H5N1) virus infection was laboratory-confirmed among humans or poultry.

Figure. Geographic distribution of identified human cases in influenza A(H5N1)–affected villages, Cambodia, 2006–2014, Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, 2005–2014 (circles indicate areas investigated in 2014). Village distribution reflects population density. “Commune affected by A(H5N1)” refers to Cambodian communes in which A(H5N1) virus infection was laboratory-confirmed among humans or poultry.

Main Article

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